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Blue eggs are simple, it's one dominant gene. Having either one or two copies of the gene makes blue shells, no copies makes white shells. Note, I mean the actual shell; if you peel the membrane out of the inside of a blue or green egg, it's blue on the inside. A brown egg is white on the inside because brown is a sort of overlay put on toward the end of building the egg. All eggs are either white or blue with varying amounts of brown 'painted' over them.

Brown is a lot more complicated. There are a ton of genes for that brown overlay that make a spectrum of different shades. Some of these genes are sexlinked, and some are not. Those sexlinked genes are why it is said that the rooster determines the egg color in his daughters; he can pass sexlinked genes to both his sons and his daughters, while a hen can only pass sexlinked genes to her sons, so her daughters will never inherit those genes from her.

There's also apparently a gene that some white egg layers like Leghorns have that whitens their white eggs to be extra bright white, which can effect other shell colors as well, making them paler. Legbars being part Leghorn may carry this gene, which is likely why their blue eggs are often paler than blue eggs from an Ameraucana, for example.

Anyway, not knowing 100% the background of these two roosters, it's really hard to predict what egg color their daughters will produce.
 
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