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I have an extra wood layer I bolt on the enclosed portion during winter and then remove during the brutal summers.
 

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Haha, after 15 years living in Alaska, the husband and I are thinking strongly about doing just that.
I'm located in SW Ohio....it's sunny and in the upper 30's here today but if I could talk my wife into moving to Texas I'd be gone tomorrow!!!:D
 

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Lots of straw, extra treats/scratch to keep them moving around and warm. Always making sure they have water that hasn't froze solid. I had some plastic on a few sides to keep the blowing snow out but the last wind storm blew it off. I probably had 100 staples in it too.
 

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We've done a few around here. wind blocks, straw on the ground to keep moisture down. Food at all times to help them keep warm... Other ideas???
Bales of straw or hay can be a good idea to help "insulate" your coops if you get a lot of wind or extreme cold! Just make sure your coops are still properly ventilated....improper ventilation can cause excess moisture/humidity and the damp conditions will kill chickens FAST!
 

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Some breeds require more than others. The ones that require the least are the American games. They are a hearty bunch.
I would think (based upon my limited experience with them) the ones that require the most, are any of the Bantams, or smaller breeds.
For most of the 4-7 pounders a nice dry place out of the wind, and off the ground will work just fine. For the smaller ones, <4 pounds, they'll need a tighter enclosure, and mabe even a source of heat.
Here in the balmy south a bantam will freeze to death, if the temp drops much below about 35.
Our games roost in the trees at temps in the low 20's with no troubles. But sometimes the straight comb ones will get a little frostbite, but they get dubbed anyway as per APA rules.
We've been known to bring our Bantams in the house, and let 'em roost on the dresser, When it gets bitter cold.
 

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Here in the balmy south a bantam will freeze to death, if the temp drops much below about 35.
I guess My banties missed that memo ...

Each year we have temps that drop to the singles or below and I have never had a problem with them in cold temps ... but that is just me.
 

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Our layers are spoiled. They are in an insulated and heated hen house. Just a heat lamp on a timer but it keeps them comfy and warm. Our bantys are in small chicken tractors that move into the barn for the winter and we don't raise meat birds in the winter so that pen airs out for a few months.
 

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Our girls are also spoiled. We've only had our 6 chickens since May. We made a coop inside our shop. Just before Christmas I bought a heat lamp that is on most of the time (2 settings). I also convinced my hunny they need light during the day. Since we added these two things, the egg production went from maybe one egg per day, to 6 per day. There had been a risk that they would be losing their heads!
We are in central Ontario Canada and they surely would have frozen to death by now - today the temp is -16c which is...about +1F.
 

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I guess My banties missed that memo ...

Each year we have temps that drop to the singles or below and I have never had a problem with them in cold temps ... but that is just me.
It's so cold here today...I'm really counting on your advise! Thanks so much! Jen:)
 

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Do they live outside?
The have a coop ... no heat or light, just a place to get out of the weather.

Edit to add: Tonight we are to get down to teens with a wind chill well below that. The banties belong to my son, he bought/traded them over the last 10 years or so ... and we have never had a problem with the cold and banties. (sorry)
 

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It's so cold here today...I'm really counting on your advise! Thanks so much! Jen:)
I can tell you what worked for me over the past 20 odd years and we have had more than a few different breeds over that time frame. They need a place to get out of the weather. (as I have said they are a rather hardy critter.)

I once had a guy on a forum to slam me rather hard on the way I winter chickens ...( he lost more than a few birds). Then after he posted pictures of his coop, well ... duh....3 shipping pallets nailed together does not make a coop. (IMHO)

Best of luck in the cold snap.
 

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Just wanted you to know *Sundancer* my girls all made it! Oh! It was sooooooooooo cold. 0* and with the wind chill...alot colder! I'd like to learn alot more about your Homesteading way of life...when you have time. I bet alot of us on here would! Thanks again! Jen:)
 

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we have snow here and my girls dont like it all. thwey tend to spend alot more time in the coop, plenty of wood shavings to keep them warm and making sure they have water and plenty of food.
will need to sort my coop out though as it seems to be leaking......not good.
 

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I have a silver wyandotte rooster with frostbite :( I don't understand because they all go in their coop at night and the doir shut ...:(
 

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TheGarryFarm said:
We've done a few around here. wind blocks, straw on the ground to keep moisture down. Food at all times to help them keep warm... Other ideas???
reading this thread eagerly. caught by surprise with a gift of baby chicks, I made the garage a temporary hen house, but come spring I will have to get something set up that will take care of my girls from now on. the south facing side of the garage seems like a promising location. Shady in summer. sunny in winter. not too far from the house for watering and cleaning and egg collection. Now, trying to come up with fox proof, weatherproof design...
 
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