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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I used to raise parrots and I know that with them it is a bad sign when there is excessive moisture in the mouth.

I'm wondering if it's the same with chickens.

My 8 week old Bantam Frizzle roo has formed, for want of a better description, a couple of spit bubbles at the side of his beak.

The only thing that has changed is that he's been "free ranging" the last couple of days, so eating bugs and pecking through the dirt; and that it's gotten pretty hot here. 90 degrees today. It's not as hot as it gets so I'm worried that if it's the heat that they won't handle the summer well.

If it is bad, what can I do about it?
 

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Flocker
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Hello Majorchicken! Have you smelled the bubbles coming from his mouth? He could have either a respiratory infection or a sour crop. If there is a bad smell, then it is a sour crop, or an impacted crop. Warm some mineral oil and give him just a little bit, and massage his crop every hour or so until it goes down and the bubbles stop. If not, then it may be a respiratory infection. Watch his breathing and see if it seems labored, or if he is wheezing or coughing, too. If he is, then he needs some antibotics in his water. I would guess the impacted crop. Is his crop hard?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
His crop isn't hard but after I felt at it to check, he had more bubbles come up. So maybe it is his crop? I know he's been eating bugs today and he had a sizable spider.

ETA my husband just checked again and there is a sour smell. So we should do the mineral oil treatment?
 

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Flocker
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Ok, it sounds like he has a sour crop. The oil is the treatment for an impacted, or hard crop. The sour crop is slightly different, Sour crop can be helped by holding the bird face-down, at about a 60 degree angle, and massaging the crop towards the throat....the stinky mess should come out like vomit, and reduce the swelling. Be sure to let the hen breathe between bouts of massaging, and keep her inside for a couple days after, feeding soft foods and adding a little bit (1tbsp/gallon) of baking soda to the drinking water to combat the acidity. Do NOT use cider vinegar to treat this, as it only adds to the acid burden.

This information was taken from this link for you:http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/04/answers-from-chicken-vet-on-impacted.html

Google is a great friend if you have a diagnosis, or symptom! Let us know!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I just want to say for other beginners who might have this problem that it worked like a charm! In 15 years of raising parrots I never had a case of sour crop but now I know what to do. Thanks again fuzziebutt!
 
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