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Anyone had anything like this? Called my vet out and she was shocked as the swelling in her head and now neck is air! All under her chin and down her neck too. Vet said maybe she was punctured by something but we can't find any hole. She didn't give antibiotics as no infection. Just air?? Said there was nothing more she could do
 

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Maybe she was bit by something. Maybe it's a reaction to something? Does she eat and drink and act normal?
 

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Yes that is what vet suspects, she was punctured and now filling up with air. Its called subcutaneous emphysema from everything I have googled. But cant find any answers as to whether it will just go away on it's own or whether I need to deflate it. For now she is acting completely normal, eating, drinking and mating like nothing is wrong.
 

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Yes, leave it alone it will naturally escape through the skin. There is no way you can remove the air safely since it has leached in to the skin in tiny air bubbles.
 

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I have had chickens get stung in the head area by yellow jackets. Rather than using a Benadryl tab like the past, I took advice on using children's Benadryl liquid. I used .5 ml for a 6 lb hen given orally and it remedied the swelling and breathing difficulty.

Certain bacteria and viral infections can cause swelling in Turkeys. Bad drinking water hygiene gives these microorganisms a breeding ground. If you see ocular or nasal discharge, you may need antibiotics such as Lincomycin-Spectinomycin soluble powder (L-S 50) or Denagard in drinking water, or an injectable such as Enrofloxacin (Baytril). Tetracyclines are not very effective.
 

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Thanks Mike. The vet went to give antibiotics before she realised it was air. So she said because there is no infection as such There is nothing to treat at this time. No nasal discharge or goopy eyes etc. It does appear to be going down, some days worse than others but she seems perfectly happy and still eating and drinking?
 

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Excellent before and after pics.

I was going to suggest a test you could do for yourself to assure the vet was correct but it's too late now. If it happens again there is a chance you can check it to confirm. The biggest challenge would be getting the bird to agree to you touching its head. What you would be listening for is a crackle when you push lightly on the skin. It's almost like popping bubble wrap but on a much smaller scale.
 

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The vet is wrong, there is a way to get the air to be released, sometimes it's nothing major but sometimes it can be a sign of a serious underlining issue. I recommend going to another vet from now on, I am not the brightest lightbulb in the hallway but saying that nothing can be done for that issue in particular is a tad bit ridiculous. Thankfully it is going down, sometimes it can go down on it's own, but again it's good to get a second opinion to make sure nothing serious is going on.
 

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As a former RT I can attest to the fact there is nothing to be done to remove the air that has already escaped in to the skin. The bird either had a puncture that sucked air in or an air sac that leaked air in to the body cavity. Once the source of the air leak stopped air did not continue to build up under the skin.

As someone who has seen it in horses and humans, my husband being one of them, I for a fact know there is nothing that can be done to remove the air once it's reached a certain point under the skin. If it remains in a body cavity, such as around the lungs that can be bled off but not after it's reached a point like this bird's.
 

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I understand, but may I add I have researched health related things and upon such research I have concluded that trapped air can indeed be released, but in some circumstances it's best to let it escape on it's own.
 

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Until you've had hands on experience with subq emphysema it would be best that you not make such declaratory statements. Your information is not totally factual and serves to cause confusion on whether the vet was right or not. Seeing those pics I can say the vet was 100% correct.

You are also incorrect that in "most" circumstances it can be removed. The goal on any medico's part is to stop the leak. If it can be stopped. If the air is putting pressure on the lungs or heart then a chest tube is inserted to allow the air to escape that is still leaking in to the body cavity. But not all can be removed that way and must be allowed to move out of the body on it's own.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Robin. Yes the vet made me feel her entire throat and chest and it was crinkling like bubble wrap. Just like you described. Good news is she is fully recovered and beating her Tom up like before :p

 
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