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papua1
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In a recent tv show, Gordon Ramsey, the well know chef from master chef, said the chiken breed La Bresse Galoise was the chicken meat Rolls Royce,, because of is fantastic flavour, wath do you think?
 

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A Round American Woman
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It's a breed from France where it has been bred for a very long time for taste. The French are very well known for taking the taste of meat and veg very seriously, and when other countries are breeding plants for their ability to ship long distances, they are breeding for flavor alone. They have national laws governing the ingredients of bread so not to taint the quality of the food.

It's kind of like the Japanese Kobe beef. It's bred and raised for specific flavor, and you pay for that in the end.

..........aahhh, it's the Chef in me coming out. :)
 

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Look for "Blue Foot" chickens, it is illegal in France to export live de Bresse (or eggs, I assume)
 

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They've been breeding some knock offs of the breed here and there, but they don't realize it's not the bird that creates the taste but how it's fed...which is simple enough to duplicate with any chicken. Could be some of us old country folk have similar tasting birds and no one knows it but us...but the way they describe these birds and how they taste sounds just like the birds we've been eating for years...without the blue feet. :cool:

White Bresse...



When butchered, the chickens have a clear reddish-pink tone to the flesh and pronounced yellowish fat. Bones are surprisingly light for sturdy, free-range birds.

Sort of like this one? This is an overly fat Black Australorp...



Poulet de Bresse are reared to exacting standards by small farms in a small designated area around the city, protected under French and European law (Appellation d'origine contrôlée) since 1957 - the first livestock to be granted such protection. AOC status was granted based on the unique characteristics of flavour given by local soil and grain, as well as the dedication of the local farmer's association to protecting quality. For example, stocks are limited by the size of the farm - with a minimum allocation of ten square meters for each bird. Diet and slaughter times are also strictly controlled. Birds are required to spend their final days in an epinette, a building traditionally used for forced feeding with grain mash and milk.

Grain mash finish after free ranging all their lives...sounds pretty much like farmers around here have done all their lives. Even the milk. Though they skip the "force feeding"... :p
At the end of the day, no chicken is worth what they are charging for these birds and I'd put the flavor of my yard birds up against any blue footed bird from France, any day! :D They describe the "gamey" flavor of the bird...well, that's just about any old hen done laying.

Pink flesh and yellow fat, indeed! Pshhaw! That there is just a chicken raised like they are supposed to be raised...out on grass!

 

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Hey, I just saw an outfit from the vendor threads here, that is selling white American Bresse for just $10. If interested, you can find their thread under vendors, OR www.hhpoultry.com
 

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It always amazes me how people say but in European countries "they don't allow this or that" but when they stick them in a cage and force feed them it's called gourmet over there?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bresse_chicken
The birds are kept free range for at least four months. From about 35 days they are fed cereals and dairy products; the diet is intentionally kept low in protein so that the birds will forage for insects. They are then "finished" in an épinette, a cage in a darkened fattening shed, where they are intensively fed on maize and milk.
Poulets or pullets are fattened for two weeks, and slaughtered at a minimum age of four months and a minimum weight of 1.2 kg; poulardes or large hens are fattened for four weeks and slaughtered at five months, when they weigh at least 1.8 kg; chapons or capons are also fattened for four weeks, and are slaughtered at eight months or more, at a minimum weight of 3 kg.[2]
 

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Boy there's an awful lot of interesting stuff in those old posts. I think the French were born with a 6th sense about taste , kinda like a dog's sense of smell. Us? I doubt anyone could tell the difference between La Gourmet Bresse and Purdue Oven Stuffer Roaster.
 

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The longer I keep chickens,the less I like to eat them.I slaughtered some extra roosters one year.Never again!Every bite I took(there weren't many), I saw a different face,who's only crime was to be a rooster but I couldn't have 10 roosters and couldn't find them homes.I haven't done babies since then,thankfully my flock number has been steady.I can sell laying hens all day long(I don't anymore) but can't give a rooster away!
 

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I do wonder if there really is a difference between all these luxury French meat breeds or if it's just a sly bit of propaganda. And every day it seems there's a new one. Now it's Barbezieux! That being said I am very happy with my [English/Roman] Dorking roosters... They were dreadfully mean to my hens but wow, did they have a nice amount of meat for such seemingly small birds! I do think they taste better than a super market bird but not to the point I would expect someone who didn't know to pick up on it. It is what it is. We eat extra roosters so we're not overrun but I do put ads up first in case anyone's looking. Recently I had a whole hatch of legbar roosters and I have most of them sold! As well as a bunch of Serama roosters which aren't worth their meat, I wouldn't think. You just never know...

PS I didn't confine my Dorkings but I did try the milk and bread fattening for two weeks... it really does pack on the weight.
 

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Milk and bread=fattening? Good to know.

I think that those French gourmet eaters have more refined palates than most people.

I think it's sad, too, that roos are so not desirable.
 
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