Chicken Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Last fall I built a Hoop coop using an old trampoline to make the frame. I used heavy duty tarp for the roof and it goes more than halfway to the ground on the sides coming just about 3 feet from the ground. I need to add ventilation so that heat that rises up can escape better. I have thermometers inside and in the heat of the day it is pushing 90 where they roost and we are just beginning our spring. So I need to vent a couple places in the top of the tarp, but I just don't know exactly what type vent would work best. I don't want water getting in and making a muddy mess since we have some feathered feet breeds.
Can anyone point me to a vent that might work for this type setup?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,247 Posts
Can you do a pic? A lot will depend on the roof structure and how a vent can be attached.

If the upper ends are open a fan blowing out mounted high up will pull excess hot air out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Can you do a pic? A lot will depend on the roof structure and how a vent can be attached.

If the upper ends are open a fan blowing out mounted high up will pull excess hot air out.
This is the tarp support. This was prior to adding the tarp or finishing it out, but that's the basic structure that supports the tarp.
2nd pic is with the tarp on. It drapes down the back side of the coop but I added a fenced area out back so I'm in the process of turning the tarp around so that it reaches the ground on both sides to keep more rain out and so that I dont have to move it to let the chickens out the pop door I'm adding on the back wall. Doing that means I then need to sheet the back wall in because they roost on the back side.
40398

40399
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,492 Posts
Perhaps adding a couple of box fans inside the hoop coop will help with temps and air flow. I use fans inside my coops and pens extensively and it helps a lot with our heat and humidity. I even have a box fan in my carport pen and a standup fan inside the coop. The 1st pic shows the box fan in the pen. The 2nd pic is the standup fan inside the coop. You want air blowing out the vent and not directly on your chickens. Indirect airflow will come in through the other vents making it cooler for your chickens. I run the box fan during the day and shut it off for the night. I run the standup fan inside the coop at night and shut it off the next morning. Then run IMG_0704.JPG IMG_0688.JPG the box fan around 11am.
40401

40400
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,247 Posts
I'm not so sure a vent will do a lot to dump air out. It appears the front is higher than the back? If that's the case the hot air is leaving out the top front.

Dawg's solution is the most workable for moving hot air out of a space like that. I use a fan on mine to keep the air moving.

Is this the hoop coop that was built from found items on your property?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Perhaps adding a couple of box fans inside the hoop coop will help with temps and air flow. I use fans inside my coops and pens extensively and it helps a lot with our heat and humidity. I even have a box fan in my carport pen and a standup fan inside the coop. The 1st pic shows the box fan in the pen. The 2nd pic is the standup fan inside the coop. You want air blowing out the vent and not directly on your chickens. Indirect airflow will come in through the other vents making it cooler for your chickens. I run the box fan during the day and shut it off for the night. I run the standup fan inside the coop at night and shut it off the next morning. Then run View attachment 40400 View attachment 40401 the box fan around 11am.
View attachment 40401
View attachment 40400
No power at the coop. I'd have to run an extension cord more than a hundred feet, so that doesnt seem safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I'm not so sure a vent will do a lot to dump air out. It appears the front is higher than the back? If that's the case the hot air is leaving out the top front.

Dawg's solution is the most workable for moving hot air out of a space like that. I use a fan on mine to keep the air moving.

Is this the hoop coop that was built from found items on your property?
Yeah, the one I built last summer/fall. I'm actually turning that tarp and running it opposite from what it is now. I added a fenced area behind the coop and putting a pop door on the back wall so the tarp hanging back there is in the way. Then I'll cut an older tarp to close in the back wall around the pop door an to keep rain off the roost area.
I'm always on the lookout for building materials to be able to switch from tarp to something sturdier for the roof but prices are still high right now and I haven't found anything in online yardsales yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Yeah, the one I built last summer/fall. I'm actually turning that tarp and running it opposite from what it is now. I added a fenced area behind the coop and putting a pop door on the back wall so the tarp hanging back there is in the way. Then I'll cut an older tarp to close in the back wall around the pop door an to keep rain off the roost area.
I'm always on the lookout for building materials to be able to switch from tarp to something sturdier for the roof but prices are still high right now and I haven't found anything in online yardsales yet.
I'm not so sure a vent will do a lot to dump air out. It appears the front is higher than the back? If that's the case the hot air is leaving out the top front.

Dawg's solution is the most workable for moving hot air out of a space like that. I use a fan on mine to keep the air moving.

Is this the hoop coop that was built from found items on your property?
Also, back and front are pretty close to the same height. Photo angle gives the illusion they are not. There might be a slight difference, as in a couple inches if that, but not much at all.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,247 Posts
If you cut that back side it should provide quite a bit more air flow. Even if it's just cutting a decent size hole in it.

I've had cords setup that far and further. I just had to remember to get off my mower and move the cord so I didn't chop it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
If you cut that back side it should provide quite a bit more air flow. Even if it's just cutting a decent size hole in it.

I've had cords setup that far and further. I just had to remember to get off my mower and move the cord so I didn't chop it.
Right now I'm trying to think through my pop door and how to make it sturdy since the walls are hardware cloth. I have a temporary door in place, super hard to slide in and out so it will keep predators out but makes it hard to send a kid out to lock it up😁 I'm thinking of adding a frame around the hole from the mid support that is 4 ft from the ground to the ground support. Then just doing a drop down door that will work on a pulley from the inside of the coop. It's easy enough to go inside the coop and latch it shut. Just thinking out the logistics to see if I already have enough supplies on hand or if a trip to lowes is in order😁
I have an old fan that the base broke so we used it when camping and used bungee cords to suspend like a ceiling fan under our pop up canopy. I might pull that out and see what I can do. But you may be right in that just leaving a section open across the top back wall may be sufficient. I think I have enough roof overhang that rain wouldnt get in either. I may try that before running cords that far.
I know I need to lower a roost. I think that's why I had a frost bite issue in some combs. Didn't have frostbite at the beginning of our cold weather, just towards the last few weeks so growth is the only thing that changed. Went in to check this past week and sure enough combs were touching the tarp.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,247 Posts
OK, I was just looking at the far end. You might have to reinforce all that is already there. The door is going to be heavy so you need to know that the top support is strong and straight enough to hold an awning type door up all day. Although if you box in that entire area you want the door on you could use a swing door at that point.

The one thing for sure if you have chickens. There is always something. It never ends and it will keep your brain nimble because it's in constant use figuring out workarounds.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top