Roundworms. foamy eyes, weird sounds

Discussion in 'Emergencies, Illness, Meds & Cures' started by yag113, Dec 11, 2012.

  1. yag113

    yag113 New Member

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    Hi! New to this forum because I haven't needed any help... but suddenly I have chicken issues. I have about 17 chicken, 16 guineas and 4 peafowl who all cohabitate at night and free range in the day. Recently I had a rooster who was sounding rattly..upper respiratory problemish. I treated him w/ baytril, took him to the vet, he had roundworms. Treated all the chickens and 2 of 4 peafowl, not the guineas, with oral ivermectin about 10 days ago. Was planning to repeat today but just saw a chicken with some foamyness around one eye... WHAT is going on? I have Di-methox, Wazine, diluted Ivermectin, and VetRx.... what should I do?? Appreciate any input!
     
  2. artsy1

    artsy1 Artfulwings

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    this time of year you have alot of migrating birds, so sometimes they get infected- either way- respiratory i use either denagard(first choice, but needs to be ordered), tylan or tetrycline in the water for 5-7 days, its a good idea to have some antibiotics on hand - isolate the one with the foamy eye- here is an article a friend wrote on repiratory issues

    here is an article a friend of mine wrote on respiration issues,
     

  3. artsy1

    artsy1 Artfulwings

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    part 2 of the article

     
  4. toybarons

    toybarons I luv Polish & Houdans

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    The bubbles are most likely sinusitis which is a CRD. These bubbles can show up either around they eye or nasal cavitity. You should remove the infected bird and any others showing bubbles from you flock and isolate them in a warm, not hot, area.

    You said you have baytril. I would use that to treat. Sinusitis takes 14 days to go through a bird. If the bird doesn't die within the first 5 days, the bird may likely recover. However, you should know that once recovered, your bird is then a carrier of that CRD and in times of stress may shed that virus and pass it to other birds. If you have a closed flock, have no plans of ever selling that bird, then you have no problem in keeping it alive. I myself have treated my own birds for sinusitis, they have recovered and have never cause further problems to the rest of my flock.

    What is going on with your flock is likely this. Think of a CRD as a cold or flu. One bird catches it first, most likely from a wild bird who droppings your chicken came into contact with, a mouse or rat could have brought it into the coup, or you could have passed it on unknowingly by being in a friend's coop. Like a cold, one bird who has it can easily pass it on to others in the flock. All CRDs have an incubation period of 24 hours to 14 days before you will see symptoms. Some CRDs are like a cold in that once symptoms show, it can take up to 14 days before it runs its course in the chicken and the bird shows no more visible signs of infection. However there are some CRDs that act more like a flu and these can be highly infectious and dangerous to your flock. One bird gets it, your whole flock can be at high risk. Usually infected flocks with these kind of CRDs will have high die offs within a couple of days of your first birds showing symptoms.

    Always remove sick birds from your flock and isolate them for observation and treatment. While doing this, it is important to watch the rest of your flock to see if any other birds show symptoms. If it's just the one bird, then likely you have a mild CRD that you can choose to treat. Baytril is a good treatment. Tyaln powder mixed in with the drinking water is also good. Dengard mixed in water, also good. These will treat the majority of CRDs you will encounter in a flock.

    The one thing you always want to watch for is blood coming from the mouth or sinus. If you see blood, you have a higly infectious CRD in your flock and you should see a vet immediately. Your flock would then have to be tested as blood could indicate ILT which is highly infected and recovererd birds become carriers that can shed the virus to healthy stock. NOt a good thing.