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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

Pigeons have always fascinated me and I've owned many breeds over the years. There's literally something for everyone. Pigeon breeds come in many sizes and shapes. Meat pigeons that are as big as large chicken and can't fly-pigeons that can puff up their chest like a balloon-birds that strut like turkeys and fan out their tails-ones that tumble and do somersaults as they walk-others that do flips and somersaults in the air-breeds with huge feathers on their feet or crests on the head-different patterns and colors that are truly remarkable-frill pigeons that have frizzle feathers-those that have such a strong homing instinct they will fly over huge bodies of water and many hundreds of miles to reach their home loft-pigeons bred for speed and racing- on and on; something for everyone that likes pigeons.

If you have any specific questions, just ask. PJ-pigeons lay just two eggs to a clutch-I am not positive, but I doubt they ship well in that pigeons immediately start brooding as soon as the first egg is laid. I have let pigeon eggs sit a couple days without incubation and when they were incubated, no development occurred. If your interested, check online for pigeon breeders in your state. Most likely you will find a directory showing different breeders in your state and the pigeon breeds they raise.
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Doves and pigeons are closely related species and are very similar in their habits and behaviors. A tiny diamond dove and a mourning dove show the same courtship behaviors as the larger pigeons.

Pigeons are fascinating to watch as they form pair bonds. You'll see the male tagging along after a likely female, wings and tail dragging the ground as he bows his head up and down cooing loudly the whole time. If the female is suitably impressed and available she will beg to be fed; which in this case is an invitation to mate. Pigeons and doves are monogamous, but males are not above cheating if the situation presents itself. Once mated the pair loses no time in picking a likely nest site. It's the male that usually choses the place and on this site he will make a moaning sound over and over, wings quivering as he tries to entice the hen to join him. In most cases that doesn't take long. Once the site is approved by both birds the male will fly off to find nest materials while the female sits at the nest site and waits for the male to return. The male brings straw, hay, long pine needles or other course grasses. Some dove species use twigs. The material is offered to the female a piece at a time and she will place it where she thinks it should be. Pigeons/doves do not make elaborate nests just enough to hold the eggs in place. I've seen many dove nest in trees that were so sparsely built the eggs could be seen through the nest bottom. Once the nest is finished it doesn't take long...
 

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Thanks Dan, I have already looked up some breeders in my area, it looks like there are a few not too far away, (south of Cleveland).
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Dan, I have already looked up some breeders in my area, it looks like there are a few not too far away, (south of Cleveland).
You're welcome. I need to look up for my state again and see if there's anyone close and what breeds are available. Pigmy Pouters would make an interesting pet-the kind that blow up their necks like a balloon and have overly long legs or Trumpeters with their crest and feathered feet. Like below from Google images.

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
... before eggs are laid. Most pigeons and doves lay a clutch of two eggs two days apart. There are some species that lay a single egg. Many people are surprised to learn that pigeons have such a small clutch of eggs as there is sooooo many pigeons flying around. It's not surprising, though, when a person learns about pigeon nesting habits. Pigeons will nest year around as long as there is plenty of liquid water and food. Frequently a pair will have two nests going at the same time; one with eggs and the other with nearly weaned squabs. Pigeons and doves are all about teamwork, both male and female work together to build the nest and both brood the eggs. The female broods at night and the male broods during the daylight hours. Pigeon eggs take 18 days to hatch; the first hatching two days before the other. When the eggs...

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Thanks Dan, I have looked up several of the folks who have pigeons near me. What breeds have you had over the years?
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Dan, I have looked up several of the folks who have pigeons near me. What breeds have you had over the years?
Homers, rollers, trumpeters, pigmy pouters, nuns, kings, American fantails, Indian fantails, oriental frills. These are only what I remember. Also Jacobins.
 

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Wonderful Friend
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Which were your favorites to keep? Can you pick just a couple?

There really are something! I had no idea so many birds belonged to the pigeon category. I am in love with the pink necked green pigeon- does anyone keep those? I haven’t even looked yet bc I have enough to handle for now! Lol but I’m curious.
 

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Oh my, so that's what they're called! Pygmy pouters are a bit terrifying 😂. English carriers are even more terrifying. I love pigeons all the same though!
English Carrier...Known,as the Letter Carrier Pigeon. Beautiful color, but  what happened to his beak??? | Pigeon breeds, Finches bird, Pigeon pictures
 

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Oh my, so that's what they're called! Pygmy pouters are a bit terrifying 😂. English carriers are even more terrifying. I love pigeons all the same though!
English Carrier...Known,as the Letter Carrier Pigeon. Beautiful color, but  what happened to his beak??? | Pigeon breeds, Finches bird, Pigeon pictures
That looks so wrong.

I'm with OM, I had no idea there were so many varieties of pigeons out there.
 

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When I was going to college in Dublin I remember mostly various homing/racing/Belgian/Dutch varieties. On some of those breeds the bill growth became heavier with age. They only raced them for a few years but some of the breeding stock could become really old, I want to say around twenty and they would make several nests a year.
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Which were your favorites to keep? Can you pick just a couple?

There really are something! I had no idea so many birds belonged to the pigeon category. I am in love with the pink necked green pigeon- does anyone keep those? I haven’t even looked yet bc I have enough to handle for now! Lol but I’m curious.
That's a tough one to answer because it changed over time. Indian Fantails capture the imagination as do pigmy pouters. But rollers and homers are such fun to watch fly. I could keep going...

Pink-necked-can't remember. Quick research! I doubt it is something commonly kept. I do know they are expensive. Probably more a zoo or botanical gardens resident.
 

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What is the average for pigeons? It sounds like a pair could be around forever.
3-5 years for wild, 12-15 for domestic and some breeding pairs 21-22 years. I know in Ireland they always kept winning racing birds, ( ones that won more than one 650 mile race), some of the breeding pairs keep two nests going simultaneously if they have good access to nutrition and a safe home.
 

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I remembered that about the homers.

I wonder what it's about that pigeons that they can be so long lived. As tiny as quail are they only live 3 to 5. If we get lucky we can have chickens that live longer than ten years.
 

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Wonderful Friend
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It has something to do with the heartbeat ratio. Sound odd?
Many smaller hearts have less ‘beats’ in them; there is a theory that is somewhat? proven? I can’t recall it’s exact status scientifically speaking. At any rate- same as how mice vs rats, gerbil vs guinea pig, etc: I will have to see if I can find that again.
It basically says that we start out with an average lifespan in our hearts, and environmental things do affect it but basically a set, or average number of beats in a lifetime. Genetics and all that are obvious factors but again- I’ll have to find more. It’s neat but kinda makes sense.
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Some parrot species can live 50 years. When I lived in WI, one pet shop had a amazon parrot that was over 100; or so they claimed.
 
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