Pest dog

Discussion in 'Parasites, Pests, & Predators' started by rcorliss, Aug 8, 2013.

  1. Shoot it

    46.2%
  2. Call the cops

    38.5%
  3. Scare it away

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Talk to the neighbor again

    15.4%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. rcorliss

    rcorliss New Member

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    So I thought I had lost two of my Mallard ducks to A Bobcat.We spotted said Bobcat in our yard near our chicken coop.Our chickens and ducks free range.We lost one then three weeks later we lost another.Thats when we spotted the Bobcat.Last night we saw the real culprit.Our neighbor has two dogs . He has one of those underground electric fences for them.One of his dogs came up our driveway hair standing on end and barking at us like mad.My husband chased it off.My husband said he saw the ducks after that.The male and female that I had left after the first two went missing.I started getting worried thinking about them so I went out about ten minutes after we spotted the dog.There was my male duck in front of our coop calling for the female and she was no where to be found.I looked down the hill into my neighbors yard and saw the dogs eating our duck. He tried to tell my husband that his dogs never leave his yard because of the fence but I have seen them several times in the road, even way at the end of the road. :mad:
     
    Shelly W likes this.
  2. fuzziebutt

    fuzziebutt Flocker

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    Have a gun ready to defend your property, and when you shoot HIS dog on YOUR property, then maybe he'll believe you. :mad:
     
    whitehorse likes this.

  3. Apyl

    Apyl New Member

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    Legally you may not be able to shoot the dog if you have residents within 100 yards ( more or less, depends on your laws) of where you are shooting. If you do and the neighbor calls the cops then you'll be the one fined and possibly loose your guns. If you are rural and the dog is coming from a ways down then yes shoot it. I would if a dog came here and killed my flock after already talking to the owner. So really it depends on how close the neighbor is/are to your yard.
     
  4. jennifer

    jennifer New Member

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    I have had many many dogs here at my house. We have have a lot of land here..I have lost a few hens due to aggressive dogs. I warned the owners and my rule of thumb is once. The dog comes back and I catch it and call animal control or take it to the shelter. I always tell the owner that I have done. I have had some growl at my children. In that case I shoot. I always make the owner aware what my plan is and give them the option. I love animals and hate owners who neglect to make the right choices for their own.
     
    whitehorse and Maryellen like this.
  5. Bee

    Bee Active Member

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    I have a similar rule. If I can catch the dog, we will call the owner(if it has a collar and ID) and let them come get him. We give a pleasant suggestion that we wouldn't want to see him here again because we have chickens....the only chickens around in the middle of acres of woodland. In other words, the only reason a dog is here is for the chickens.

    If he comes back again, he is gone..disappeared. No coming back from that walk.

    If one comes that cannot be caught, runs like he's been shot when you open the door of the house..this is a habitual stray that has been shot at before. We know at that point that he is a problem and he will be dispatched when next he comes to the property...and he will sooner or later. And he disappears also.
     
  6. Grimm

    Grimm New Member

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    Take pictures next time the dog is on your property. Show the owner and tell them that next time the dog trespasses he will not be coming home. I'm not saying you kill the dog (laws may prohibit) but you can always take the dog to the pound or call animal control.

    Since the dog has already killed one of your ducks you have the right to protect your livestock. Call your local sheriff and ask what are your legal rights in protecting your flock. Also give the local animal control a call. They may be able to fine the owner or even take the dog since it has already killed livestock. In some places this is a very serious issue and dogs have been put down for wounding livestock.

    There was a dog that use to visit the farm I grew up working on. He would chase the chickens and ducks all day. One day he finally caught one of the hens and killed her while he was playing with her (broke her wing and both legs before shaking her to death). The owners of the dog blamed us for allowing the birds to free range on our own property. Animal control did not agree and put the dog down saying that now he had a taste for blood and would not stop killing the birds if allowed to live. The owners were fined for not keeping the dog on their property, ordered to pay restitution for the dead hen and any eggs/chicks she may have produced and ordered to refrain from owning anymore dogs for 3 years.
     
  7. galanie

    galanie New Member

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    I prefer Bee's approach. Do not tell the owner you will do anything. Because something else may happen to the dog and guess who is going to get the blame? Yep. You.
     
  8. havasu

    havasu Active Member

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    Why punish the dog?
     
  9. Bee

    Bee Active Member

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    It's not a punishment, it's a solution. The owner is not the one tearing through a chicken flock, the dog is. The dog is just doing what comes natural to a predator animal and predators are eliminated with a final solution. If a fox keeps preying on your livestock, you shoot it. No different for a dog.

    It's all about territory and food supply and it is the same in the wild. Apex predators usually have a territory they defend in order to protect their food supply and humans are no different. What happens to that dog is a natural result of one predator poaching in another predator's territory.

    Unfortunate for the dog is the fact that he has been taught to be familiar with humans without also learning the dangers of eating their food supply. Some lessons learned are the last lessons one gets in the natural world.

    If you find that cruel, please realize that if the food ever grows scarce on the store shelves you will see a "civilized" society suddenly revert to these same rules of survival. "Cruel" is only one famine away from our doorstep. If you believe differently, you might have been asleep in class when they taught history in school.

    Fact of life...keep your dog at home and no "punishment" occurs.
     
  10. havasu

    havasu Active Member

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    Sorry, but as a police K-9 trainer for 1/5th of my lifetime, I have a huge heart for dogs. The owner is who you need to go after.

    By the way, I didn't sleep in school, and ready to take action IF and WHEN the time comes, but not before.
     
  11. Bee

    Bee Active Member

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    Going after the owner seems like a good solution, doesn't it? Maybe where you live it works that way and I'm so glad for you!

    Out where I live it doesn't work that way. Nothing happens at all. Nada. Zip. Zero. Are you sitting there, possibly, thinking that we are all just a bunch of trigger happy fools with hard hearts for dogs? I have a dog. I love dogs! I HATE killing dogs...makes my stomach sick. But so does a lot of the harder things in life that produce a food supply at home.

    This does not negate the fact that~in my area~the law could care less about your livestock, your property or anything else that is destroyed by a dog. They don't care even if the dog has threatened a human or even bit a human. There is no animal control here...maybe there is in the city or burb where you live but there is no such thing here.

    Your solutions may work in your area and that is wonderful that you have that resource. In other areas it doesn't work and the farmer is forced to enact their own animal control. The police actually expect you to do so...I know, I've spoken with them and had them on my property to visualize the damages. I was advised to take the dog out and shoot it..by the police.

    That's what passes for animal control here and I have learned to act preventatively with stray dogs...and learned that lesson the hard way. You may have a heart for dogs and that is wonderful..so do I. For dogs that are where they are supposed to be and controlled by their owners. Others are assumed to be predators and will be treated as such.
     
    whitehorse likes this.
  12. Grimm

    Grimm New Member

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    Whatever you decide to do about this killer dog stay within the limits of the law for your own protection. If you shoot the dog you better have proof it was a threat to you and yours.
     
  13. nj2wv

    nj2wv New Member

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    if a dog comes after my chickens i would shoot it .. i live in a rural area and there is nothing the county could do if i complained about dead chickens
     
  14. kjohnstone

    kjohnstone New Member

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    I've never heard of an underground electric fence. Generally, contact with the ground dampens out the electric charge and it's like nothing. If it is somehow protected from the ground, how can it possibly work on anything???? hmmmmm. Check the legality first, and if OK, shoot the dog. But make sure the dog is on your property, so your neighbor can't claim the dog was under control. Somehow my bull**** alarm is going off on that alleged electric fence. Now I have to research this for my own peace of mind!
     
  15. havasu

    havasu Active Member

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    With an underground "electric" fence, you dig the wire around the perimeter of the property. The dog then wears a collar which when it passes this underground wire, sends an electric current into the dog's neck. it is pretty good, but does need time to teach the dog where not to go.
     
  16. Grimm

    Grimm New Member

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    Second.

    There are cases where the fence doesn't deter the dog. Same with the shock bark collars. It just doesn't work for all dogs. Our dog doesn't seem affected by the shocks from these fences or the bark collars. We were able to train her not to bark with the spray collar. She sees it and she stops barking. As for staying on our property- the only thing that will make her leave the property is a deer passing through. She goes into flush mode and will chase them up the mountain til I recall her.

    I have worked with some dogs that the shock would knock them off their feet and they'd be wimpering for hours. Not little dogs but working/hunting dogs.
     
  17. Bee

    Bee Active Member

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    I never liked the in ground electric system...too many problems with them and the dog gets shocked when he tries to come back in the perimeter.

    I have had a wireless electric containment system for the past 9 yrs or so and love it. The weather doesn't affect it, it can be adjusted immediately and you can take it wherever you go. The signal seems stronger also. If a dog should happen to go across the boundary it doesn't shock him when he comes back in, so this is a plus.

    To set it up? Plug it in, adjust the boundary level and put a collar on your dog. Done.
     
  18. 7chicks

    7chicks New Member

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    I would say something to the neighbor about what's happening. I would also KEEP my ducks & chickens penned up in a safe place where the dogs can't get to them and locked into their coop at night. We also have a neighbor who's dog has come here and almost got one of my hens. Luckily Sophie let me know what was happening since she was the one the dog had in sight. We got to the dog in time and Sophie was safe. Ours are allowed outside when we are home with them and our big dog is out with them. Leaving them to free range leaves them open to many other predators besides the neighbor's dog.
     
  19. kjohnstone

    kjohnstone New Member

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    It would seem that the shocking device on the collar must need a battery to work, and batteries don't last, so unless the neighbor keeps up the batteries in the collar, then nothing? I think the traditional electric fence would be much more effective.
     
  20. havasu

    havasu Active Member

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    On another forum I frequent, I read today that the member's horse (just an old, retired, and barely walking horse) broke through the fence and it appears his neighbor shot and killed it. Is this the latest trend happening these days?