Oiling eggs

Discussion in 'Egg Quality & Storage' started by CCWriter, Jun 20, 2012.

  1. CCWriter

    CCWriter Insanity Has It's Perks

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    I admit it. I watched that prepper show, and decided to oil some of my ladies eggs. Now, I have a dozen oiled eggs I'm wondering HOW to use :p Have any of you tried oiling eggs and, if so, what can you use them for, other than deviled eggs? Did oiling change the taste/texture?
     
  2. Sundancers

    Sundancers New Member

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    Do tell ... (no tv here)

    What kind of oil did you use?
     

  3. vondonna

    vondonna New Member

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    I saw the same show, but I don't remember what kind of oil.... assume it was vegetable oil. I don't know that I'd want to eat a 2 year old egg that hadn't been refrigerated. And you can bet I'd be cracking that shell outside. LOL
     
  4. CCWriter

    CCWriter Insanity Has It's Perks

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    She used mineral oil, so I did too. They've been oiled like that for several months now. I figured, before I cracked any open, I'd scrub the oil off a few and do the water test. Just nervous about taste and texture.
     
  5. Sundancers

    Sundancers New Member

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    I've heard of the method and some ol time ways, "salted butter in salt" but never have used them myself.

    You must keep us up to date. :) Did they use any on the show or just a how to guide?
     
  6. CCWriter

    CCWriter Insanity Has It's Perks

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    She made deviled eggs with them, Sundancers. I read about the butter somewhere. I cheat, I can it :p
     
  7. Roslyn

    Roslyn A Round American Woman

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    I would wash the oil off with some dish soap and then take one outside and crack it. No other way to know. At least you would be outside if that smell hit you, better than in your kitchen!!! :eek:

    I purposefully rotten some eggs in my basement one year. I put them in a bucket and then waited until I could just smell the "woofy" scent. I read that the smell of rotten eggs helps keep deer out of your garden. I thought why not, I've got lots of eggs!!

    Well, first I was shocked at how long it took for them to rot. And then I used a spoon to fling them along the border of the garden. I think it kept the deer out, but it also kept ME out. GAG, that smell lingered. However, it attracted every raccoon, possum and skunk in the valley.

    :rolleyes:
     
  8. Sundancers

    Sundancers New Member

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    Thanks for the tip and the smile! :D
     
  9. ORChicknlady

    ORChicknlady New Member

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    This is a funny story but the rotten eggs, makes me think of my dad.

    My dad (passed away now) was a Navy Commisaryman in the Korean War. Towards the end of their tour, they had to go through the eggs and find out what was good. He said that they would sit with two bowls, if they cracked the eggs and it looked and smelled good, it went in bowl number one, eggs that were black (yes black) went into bowl number two and were thrown overboard.

    He said the smell was nauseating and would send the younger new guys out getting sick overboard. I could not understand why the eggs had gotten so bad so quick since he said it was a refridgerated unit they were in, he said some of these eggs had been sitting around some Navy storage since WWII and unless they had been cracked or blew up of their own accord, they were put into the coolers to use!!!! WWII eggs being used about 10 years later, ugh, thats just unbelievable.
     
  10. Roslyn

    Roslyn A Round American Woman

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    Oh my Gosh, that is too funny!!! That isn't a job, that's a punishment!! :eek:
     
  11. ORChicknlady

    ORChicknlady New Member

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    Believe it or not, he loved eggs even after that.....

    Does tell you eggs can last a long time if kept right (he said plenty of those WWII eggs were still like fresh).
     
  12. CCWriter

    CCWriter Insanity Has It's Perks

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    I told DH and Son about your post, as it floored me! Eating eggs, 10 YEARS LATER?!!! Wonder what their storage method was, that kept them so long?

    DH has decided it's time to try them out. Truth be told, he really wants deviled eggs, so that's what we're going to do with them. Wash them well, float them, maybe crack one open - outside - if the float test is bad and if it isn't, I'll cook them up and report back. ;) Please note: If I don't report back within a week, consider the experiment failed and I am either in the hospital with a severe case of food poisoning, or worse... :)
     
  13. Sundancers

    Sundancers New Member

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    Look forward to your report.
     
  14. ORChicknlady

    ORChicknlady New Member

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    Personally I would have avoided the 10 year old eggs....He said they were used mainly for cooking or baking, but not directly eaten. Something stored properly shorter time, I am not even sure about. I collect, clean and refrigerate mine, I have let them sit out a couple of days in the basket, but thats all (uncleaned, once cleaned in a sink of cool water with a few drops of soap, they go in fridge).
     
  15. CCWriter

    CCWriter Insanity Has It's Perks

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    So, I made the deviled eggs. DH's Mom and Dad were here for dinner, so they got to try them too :D Quick note first: I am a taste/texture kind of person, if either one is off, I won't eat it. For DH it's taste/smell.
    I cleaned the eggs well, then put them in a pot of water to boil. I noticed a bit of oil on top of the water once they were done, however. Maybe it was oil trapped in the shell membrane? They were horrible to peel! Worse than really fresh eggs! I would recommend buying those 'eggie' things. Smell: DH said they smelled normal, whatever that means :p Taste: The taste was just fine, except they were slightly bland. I used everything I normally do, in the same proportions. We all agreed they tasted ok, but like I had forgot to add something, or not enough of something, but nobody could pinpoint what that something was. Texture: I expected rubbery. Nope, not rubbery - very mushy. The 'filling' was firm, but the white was mush. I couldn't eat more than one. DH had eight. The inlaws refused to eat more than one, once they found out 'what they were' :rolleyes: Our conclusion: We plan to try oiling again. This next time, we'll try using them IN a recipe. I agree with ORChicknlady, they should probably be used in baking or cooking. At least, that's what we found. By the way, the date on the carton was 2/16/12, and the shells seemed to have 'absorbed' a lot of the oil when I took them out. Since mineral oil is used as a laxative, I was concerned, but no ill effects :D
     
  16. Sundancers

    Sundancers New Member

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    Cool experiment and thanks for the smile (your inlaws :D) and sharing the info ...
     
  17. ORChicknlady

    ORChicknlady New Member

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    Mineral oil? Ooohh...I would have used veggie oil at least. Yeah maybe the oil does seep in and cause some taste and texture changes. As for their age, thats not old...my sister-in-law is not known as one of the best cooks, oh, heck, ok she's downright awful in the kitchen..anyways, early in their marriage, she called me with a question if she could use eggs that were from over one year prior in baking. sure they'd been refridgerated, but...I advised not to since at the time all our kids were small.

    I would assume the proteins in the egg would have broken down to a point of being only good enough to bake with in your eggs. You can tell by how runny the whites are. Like water? Then they are really old. My day fresh eggs from mine will stand tall in the pan. Could be with that protein breakdown it also could affect the taste but not safety of the eggs.

    Always trust your sense of smell and taste as well as how something feels in your mouth, it is all naturally there to protect us from things which are not good for us, or could make us sick. I know, sometimes it is just how were are on a personal level, but some of it is there to protect us too.
     
  18. CMCLB

    CMCLB New Member

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    I was just telling a friend about this! She had 18 dzn in her fridge.
     
  19. cindy

    cindy New Member

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    how did your great-grandparents store eggs? many folks regularly stored their eggs and used them throughout the winter months.
    Chickens normally respond to daylight by laying more eggs. Oppositely, when there is little daylight, there are fewer eggs layed. So in the winter when days are shorter, it's was good to be able to depend on an egg supply.
    We have been duped all these years about eggs needing to be refrigerated. First of all, they come out of the chicken "warm" don't they?
    A just-laid egg has a coating on it called the "bloom". This coating keeps oxygen and bacteria out of the egg. don't wash off the "bloom" If you are lucky enough to have fresh eggs they can be kept in a cool place for months without refrigeration.
    mineral oil is a petroleum product and you don't want to absorb it into your body.
    use lard or shortening to coat the eggs, first melt the grease and cool it till it begins to solidify again. Dip each egg in the melted grease individually and set them on a paper towel to dry. When the shortening or lard is dry on the eggs, rub the eggs with a clean towel, removing excess solid grease. Rub gently and buff each egg. Now repeat the process, before the shortening solidifies. Work fast, allowing the shortening to get almost solid before re-heating it.
    Line the bottom of a flat box with a clean soft towel. Place the eggs in the box in a single layer. Cover the box with either a lid or another towel. Place the box of eggs in a cool, dry environment. Eggs prepared this way will last up to 6 months, although I have heard people say that they have kept eggs this way for 1 year if they are kept cool.
    A product used to coat eggs in this way, but that is supposed to keep the eggs fresh longer is K-Peg. The eggs are coated with this product much the same way they would be coated with the shortening, and prepared for storage the same way.
    The other way to keep eggs works on the same principle, cover the pores and keep the eggs cool. However, the eggs must be kept immersed in a solution of Liquid Sodium Silicate. It is usually mixed with sterilie water.
    Liquid Sodium Silicate is a non-toxic substance that will cover the pores of the egg shell so well that you will probably be able to keep fresh eggs for up tp 2 years! You can buy it as Sodium Silicate Solution at any pharmacy, however they may not have it on hand and have to order it for you.
    Again, you will have to keep the temperatures very cool and the humidity low.
    Place clean fresh eggs in a ceramic crock, one layer deep. Pour liquid sodium silicate over the eggs until the eggs are covered and completely immersed in the solution.
    Place a towel over the crock and tie it into place. Place the crock of eggs in a cool, dry place and don't disturb them til you are ready to use them. To use them, just take out how many eggs you need, wash them off in clear water and use as you normally would.
    Write yourself a note to remember to flip the cartons (gently) about once a month to maintain the integrity of the yolks.
     
  20. thumper347

    thumper347 New Member

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    The only bad thing I could see about using a vegitable or other cooking oil is that is would go rancid after a short time (6-8 months). Where mineral oil wouldn't.