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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well as the subject said it I'm new to BYC and just got 4 chics would love it if sumbody could tell me what I have. Please an thank you. O annnnd I'm super down for any tips or advice.

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It's hard to tell just by looking at them in this photo. Did you get them from the local feed store? Are they all about the same size, or is that dark one much smaller than the others (as it looks like it might be in the picture)?

I will take a stab at it, could be totally wrong:

If the legs on the one with the stripes are green or greenish-slate, then it's an Easter Egger, which is a mutt Ameraucana. It will likely lay greenish eggs (if it's a female.)

The one at the top of the photo is likely a Production Rhode Island Red or perhaps a Golden Comet or Cherry Egger, a commercial layer of brown eggs.

The one at the right looks like it might be a Cornish Cross or perhaps a White Leghorn (would need a closer pic to be sure.)

The dark one, if it is the same size as the others, is probably a Black Star, also a production brown egg layer. If it is much smaller than the others it might be a bantam of some sort, hard to tell what.

Take some more pictures, closer up, head shots, show us feet, better lighting, include pics of combs, we'll try to tell you more.

Have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Awesome thanks. I did get them from a local feed store here in alliance ne. I will take close up pictures off all of them and post shortly thanks again. Kinda nervous about getting started. Haha have never been around or little loan raised any before. City boy that just moved to the country. Would love tips on chickens/raising. I have read a lot of things on here just want to kno as much as I can before they go outside.
 

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The best thing you can do is spend time reading the threads in this forum, you'll find a ton of good info here!

But remember, raising chickens is easy. You can go crazy trying to think about everything, but it's pretty simple. I wrote an article you can find on my website here, but I'll post it here for you too: http://www.pathfindersfarm.com/Chickcare.html

Chicks have several very basic needs: good food, clean water, and a warm, safe,
and draft-free place to sleep and live.

First things first: When you put your new chicks into their brooder, be sure to dip
their beaks into the water gently several times to make sure they know where the
water is. It's a good idea to repeat this on the second day, just to ensure they figure
it out. Line the brooder area with rough paper towel (newspaper is too slick); after
about a week you can remove them and leave them right on the shavings.

Food: Chicks need Chick Starter (not scratch or layer feed) which has a minimum
of 18 - 20% protein. Feed this to them free-choice (as much as they want, leaving it
out at all times) until they are about 12 weeks old, then gradually switch them to
layer feed. They do not need grit while on chick starter crumbles (it comes built
right in.) Medicated feed is usually preferred; it won't hurt them and will prevent
Coccidiosis from making them ill while they build up an immunity to it.

Water: The first water you give your chicks should have about three teaspoons of
sugar per quart of water. This gives them a bit of a kick-start on their first day.
After that, you don't need to add sugar. Clean water available at all times is
necessary. Water should be changed at least once a day, and the container washed
with soap and/or bleach water at least once a week. You can add in vitamins if you
like, but they are not required; you can use the vitamin/electrolytes available for
larger livestock, but only use a scant ¼ of a teaspoon per gallon of water.

Warmth: Chicks need to be kept under a heat lamp for the first six or so weeks.
Start out with the heat at 95 degrees, and reduce it by 5 degrees each week. Don't
use a heating pad; you need to give them a chance to move away from the heat if
they are too warm. Keeping them free from drafts is very important, a rabbit cage
is a bad place to raise chicks, even a cardboard box is better.

Safety: Chickens are very vulnerable to predators, once they are big enough to go
outside you must make sure the pen you keep them in is safe. Chicken wire is only
good at keeping chickens in, not predators out. Neighbor dogs, raccoons, skunks,
hawks, all are efficient chicken predators. Hardware cloth is good for pens; none of
those can chew or tear through it.

Health: The first week of a chick's life is when they are the most vulnerable. You
will need to check them every day to ensure they aren't "pasting up", which is
where feces will clog their vent and prevent them from eliminating. If they do get
pasted up, gently pull the dried feces away. Sometimes a bit of fluff will come with
it, this should not be a problem and will grow back quickly so don't worry about it.

Remember, chickens can be done fancy or simple, it's up to you. Have fun with
your new birds!
 

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If you have a Kindle, this is a cool little book written by all my buddies at Backyard Poultry Magazine (for which I write regularly): http://www.amazon.com/Rule-Your-Roo...71&sr=8-1&keywords=raising+chickens+christine

And this book was written by my friend Christine, it is well worth checking out: http://www.amazon.com/How-Raise-Chi...13&sr=8-4&keywords=raising+chickens+christine

One or both will be very helpful on your quest from city slicker to county boy. You'll be an old hand at this before you know it! And in the meantime, the good folks here in the Chicken Forum will be happy to help.
 

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Hmm. I am revising my guesses now. From top to bottom:

Bantam. Maybe an Old English?
Large fowl. Not sure. Is that a pea comb? Maybe Wyandotte?
Bantam. No idea of breed.
Bantam. No idea of breed.

I am not the best guesser of chick breeds. I am sure someone who is better at that will jump in here soon.

The other thing you can do is go to this website and click on the various breeds. Most will have pictures of chicks, and you can compare them and see which look the most like yours: http://www.mcmurrayhatchery.com/day_old_baby_chickens.html
 

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Do you have a basement? Chicks give off a lot of dust as they grow, you won't want it in the main part of your house, trust me. And they're smelly. A basement will be better.
 

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Plus, check with your local furniture stores for large boxes, like ones that washers and dryers and fridges come in. Those, when the top is cut off, make excellent brooder boxes.
 

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We keep our babies in giant totes and have the lights rigged up so they can't fall. We have them on our dining room table and I can not wait to get them into the coop! They are dusty and stinky now that they are three weeks +.

Look into chicken nipple watering system! They are amazing and I introduced it while they were a couple days old.
 
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