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Hi everyone,

Our family is new to chickens, and I would really appreciate some advice about deworming. We've had our newest hen for a couple weeks, now. She is doing well, eating well, and laying an egg every other day. She is quarantined from all but one of our other chickens. We took her to the vet when we first got her, and the fecal check from the vet showed roundworms. The vet told us to treat the roundworms with Ivermectin, 0.7mL for 5 days. Then, repeat the course in two weeks.

I know that there are a lot of posts already on the forum about deworming, and I did try to read through them first before posting. But, in the end, I am finding the whole subject kind of confusing and maybe a little controversial. I want to make sure that my new hen will be good to go and safe to meet my other chickens in a couple weeks.

A fair number of people seem to be saying that Ivermectin is not an appropriate wormer for chickens, or just not effective. Is there another wormer that would be better for roundworms, or a broad spectrum one to recommend? I see one called Valbazen mentioned. It looks kind of expensive. Not sure what to do, but asking to see if I need to follow up with a different wormer and, if so, how soon after the Ivermectin should I treat my hen and with what dosage? She is about five pounds.

I don't want to start any controversy for sure, but I do need some help. The vet was helpful, but I'm not sure chickens are her specialty. I was glad to find someone who would see us, though!
 

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@dawg53 is really good on worming.

I'm surprised your vet told you to use Ivermectin. And I'm trying figure out if Ivermectin now comes in an oral formulation. Topical and injectable are the only two applications I know of.

According to my vet from a few years ago, Ivermectin does not work as a dewormer because it isn't formulated to withstand their GI systems.
 

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I use Valbazen. It requires only 2 dosings, whereas Safeguard liquid goat wormer requires 5 days dosing in order to eliminate the different types of roundworms in poultry. I dont recommend using Ivermectin. It has lost its effectiveness treating large roundworms. Besides, it has a long withdrawal period.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I need to ask you something @Fern. The way you worded your post it sounded like you were concerned someone would smack you down for not searching for the answer. We don't do that here. It's simple to answer a simple question.

And I'm going to go yell at @dawg53 again for not getting here in a timely manner. ;)
Oh, thank you! I guess I do come across as sounding a little worried. It's good to hear that everyone doesn't mind fielding my beginner's questions. I'm sure there will be more!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I use Valbazen. It requires only 2 dosings, whereas Safeguard liquid goat wormer requires 5 days dosing in order to eliminate the different types of roundworms in poultry. I dont recommend using Ivermectin. It has lost its effectiveness treating large roundworms. Besides, it has a long withdrawal period.
Okay. I will order the Valbazen. I need to make sure this girl is ready to go. Thanks alot.
 

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Okay. I will order the Valbazen. I need to make sure this girl is ready to go. Thanks alot.
It's best to worm all your birds with the Valbazen. Dosage is 1/2ml given orally to each bird using a syringe without a needle. Then repeat again in 10 days.
It's best to worm them early in the morning before sunrise when it's dark outside. They will be on the roost and easy to snatch each one up and worm them, then simply release them one at a time.
 

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I'm amazed your vet advised you to utilize Ivermectin. Furthermore, I'm giving figure a shot on the off chance that Ivermectin currently arrives in an oral definition. Effective and injectable are the main two applications I am aware of.
 

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I'm amazed your vet advised you to utilize Ivermectin. Furthermore, I'm giving figure a shot on the off chance that Ivermectin currently arrives in an oral definition. Effective and injectable are the main two applications I am aware of.
Welcome to the forum.
 

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It's best to worm all your birds with the Valbazen. Dosage is 1/2ml given orally to each bird using a syringe without a needle. Then repeat again in 10 days.
It's best to worm them early in the morning before sunrise when it's dark outside. They will be on the roost and easy to snatch each one up and worm them, then simply release them one at a time.
Have not wormed my birds yet even the babies is there a certain time of year that is best to worm them and how often. Babies may be too young They will be 12 weeks old the second of October.
 

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Have not wormed my birds yet even the babies is there a certain time of year that is best to worm them and how often. Babies may be too young They will be 12 weeks old the second of October.
You can worm chicks at 5 weeks old IF they are on soil. I do it; that's when large roundworms do the most damage.
I worm my birds monthly due to our warm moist or wet soil moist of the year.

How often you worm your birds depends on your soil conditions. If you live where your soil is warm wet or moist most of the time, you'll have to worm birds frequently. If your soil is cool/cold, rocky or mountainous or desert like, you may not have to worm your birds as often. If your birds are penned all the time like mine, it's best to worm monthly.

If your soil isnt warm or moist most of the year, it's best to worm birds at the beginning of spring. Spring time is worm time. Everything comes alive in the spring...birds and the bees etc...
 
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