Natural Remedies 4 Worms, Coccidiosis and Necrotic Enteritis

Discussion in 'Emergencies, Illness, Meds & Cures' started by AnneKathrin, Sep 5, 2015.

  1. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    I know which one you're talking about. I can't believe how many people have fallen for it. My best friend was going to go spend money on it until I did the research and told her it was nothing more than diluted bleach. Sometimes I think she'd tell me she's going to do stuff before she did it because I could analyze the ingredients and let her know if it would work or not. Or if it was worth the price.
     
  2. seminolewind

    seminolewind Well-Known Member

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    Yea, I spent the $30 once for it, and opened the bottle and it had a faint bleach smell. So I read the ingredients, and the chemical is written in a way that the bleach chemical is broken down and does not look like bleach. But if you google the ingredient, it does come up bleach. In a twisted way.
     

  3. Barredrockmom

    Barredrockmom New Member

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    How is your little Rooster now? He sure is pretty.
     
  4. AnneKathrin

    AnneKathrin New Member

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    Thanks for asking! He is doing great, outside foraging with the flock again. I am glad he could get back out there before it got too cold. We got another scare when we had some hawks come after our pullets and keets. I was standing right there one of the first times it happened and they came back several times afterwards. Very daring. The chickens all set off an alarm and scurried for cover. I was worried that he wouldn't be fast enough to avoid and hide from it while we were rounding up the hens to put them in their run and since he was stuck in some brush. Everyone, including the pullets and keets, escaped unharmed though! He seems healthy enough to fend for himself now and I think he is fully recovered!

    Thank you! He is currently our only rooster of that type, a decorative Cubalaya, and we are hoping to get a female maybe next year so we can have more. He is adorable and his "big guy" toughness in such a small body makes him especially cute. He acts like he is three times his size ;-) Cubalayas have quickly become one of my favorite breeds, they are a wonderful addition to any flock.
     
  5. seminolewind

    seminolewind Well-Known Member

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    I've only had a hawk take one small pullet. But no other problem because I think the crows chase them away. I can't believe they are so bold right in front of people.
     
  6. AnneKathrin

    AnneKathrin New Member

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    I was surprised at their boldness too. Just a few days ago I thought they had moved on, but when I let the chickens out it wasn't but a day before they showed up again. This time the crows didn't get wind of them until after they were flying away. Fortuanately, again they were unsuccessful, but I think that the chickens will be staying in for a while. I feel sorry for them, but it is better than being hawk lunch.

    Any tips on scaring the hawks off, or deterring them?
     
  7. seminolewind

    seminolewind Well-Known Member

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    Not offhand. Just the crows and they are attracted to eggs. Maybe leave some out In the open to attract the crows. I'd rather have crows stealing eggs than hawks waiting for a meal. Another thing is that any type of young chirping will attract hawks. I keep big chickens but the silkie are penned and the Polish have a net over.

    Maybe someone will come along with advice.
     
  8. Alaskan

    Alaskan New Member

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    I haven't found any way to deter a determined raptor (hawk, eagle, falcon, owl, etc.), except for good stout wire.
     
  9. seminolewind

    seminolewind Well-Known Member

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    Some people let their chickens out late like an hour before dark when they say that the raptors have gone home from a day of hunting.

    I'll bet the other thing about this area is we are pigeonville USA. This 1 square mile area has some real pricey pigeons and big big coops. Maybe the raptors have better luck at other people's houses, LOL.

    It's raining here again. Blah.
     
  10. Alaskan

    Alaskan New Member

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    Later in the day the hawks go to bed... And the owls start coming out!

    That period where it is not yet getting dark is a prime owl hunting time. At least up here, probably because owls MUST hunt during daylight hours.
     
  11. MichaelA69

    MichaelA69 New Member

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    In drought during certain times of the year, predators are more desperate and persistent acquiring food. I have wild deer that find refuge all Summer here to give birth since housing development has ruined much of the area here. Does look pretty ragged and skinny so I supplement feed them. This will bring coyotes at times that need to be shot. Then in late Fall the deer begin to their trek to the hills again, and return next year. I cage trap fox/coons if I see them hanging around the property and quickly cull them.

    Hawks are always a problem. I am not advocating illegal activity, but safely picking them off with a shotgun/rifle or jaw trap on a post with a clump of feathers tied to the center of it with fishing line, flipping in the breeze has been known to eliminate them. I am fortunate to have many trees chickens can find refuge under when ranging. Mediterranean breeds tend to be more alert than dual purpose/large breeds when it comes to predators.

    Crows have been known to carry nasty avian viruses, and of course numerous quail and wild birds reside where I am. The best thing to do is cover a yard with 1" chicken wire and only feed in those protected areas.

    Wild bird feeders can be a real problem with all the droppings which can accumulate under the feeder. Chickens picking around that area are likely to pick up diseases there too.

    I keep bait boxes around the barn with bar bait which cannot be removed from the box. Rats/mice must go there to feed, and since I'm out there every day, I will see a dead one if it exists and dispose of it.

    There are lots of preventative methods that work, but sometimes you just have to kill those things which prey upon your animals. I don't like it, but know it is my responsibility.
     
  12. seminolewind

    seminolewind Well-Known Member

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    Due to the crows, I have no hawk problem or small bird problem. I may see a hawk at those times that crows are sitting on eggs. It's a kind of good/bad relationship. Usually they come down, steal and egg and leave . Maybe a few times, too.

    I have bait stations. If all the feed is locked tight at night, they eat more bait. Most run off and die. I believe I've seen 4 dead rats in 4 years, and the chickens didn't notice them.
     
  13. perchiegirl

    perchiegirl Coop Fortifier

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    they found three dead mountain lions up in Northern Claifornia two were about six months old and they died of starvation.... ONe was a full on adult that died of rat poision.

    deb
     
  14. MichaelA69

    MichaelA69 New Member

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    That's unfortunate. Irresponsible people should not be the determinant for the responsible though. Nothing worse than nanny state mentality which ultimately becomes a burden to taxpayers and demonizes responsible people through unfair legislation. Residuals in poisoned rats have not been the cause of numerous mortality in non-target species. Especially when secondary poisoning is less likely with blocks like Contrac which has an antidote to the poison (vitamin K). Seminole, like myself, use bar bait in stations which are not accessible to other animals.

    There was a recent news report about some dirt bag leaving rat poison in meat along trails where people walk their dogs. I wouldn't ban the bait, but certainly believe an individual doing such things should be put before a firing squad. It is kind of like the lunatic who buys a rifle and kills a bunch of people. The guns shouldn't be banned, but the individual committing such a crime should be put to death. Perhaps if more accountability were put on people committing crimes, the realization of the consequences would be a better deterrent.

    Where I am the animal rights crazies complained about glue traps stating they were cruel. I happen to think it is much crueler to allow a rat population to increase where disease is spread to humans and other animals, and thousands of dollars in damage has been done.
     
  15. Alaskan

    Alaskan New Member

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    I love glue traps.....
     
  16. perchiegirl

    perchiegirl Coop Fortifier

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    I have no doubt that it was an intentional poisoning... people are stupid. Mountain lions are not endangered... report it to the authorities if you have an issue. They can and will carry off game as large as a human...

    We have a community up in the mountains here that they have documented nightly forage sessions within town limits... looking for dogs and cats. People are warned through out the city and even San Diego proper... DONT leave out food for your pets. The way San Diego is layed out provides natural growth canyons as a highway for wild life. Clear to the ocean.

    Recent law changes allowing chickens within city limits are going to increase preadator interections for sure. Its worth it though.

    I am one who will kill a predator Only as a last resort. I would rather condition the resident predators that my fences bite. No matter how tempting the food is on the otherside. What this does is keep the predator and keep his territory intact... keeping others at bey.

    deb
     
  17. seminolewind

    seminolewind Well-Known Member

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    I think we need stronger punishments for animal abusers. It's a good thing that chickens got popular which is changing how food production animals are kept . What happened after California refused Missouri eggs because their cages were too small?
     
  18. perchiegirl

    perchiegirl Coop Fortifier

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    I tried them. Till I had to remove a sparrow from one. Actually the rat poison in the doses to kill a rat is pretty benign. I had a house that was infested by Norwegian Rats... the size of a bedroom slipper. What the rats do is pack their cheeks and take it home to the nest.

    But I would prefer to do it another way if I could. The best way is to make sure your house is impenetrable... inspecting openings in the eves and where utilities come in... Hardware cloth is the only deterrent. Steel wool is only good for mice... Rats will pull it out with their teeth. And the other way is to not have food out.

    deb
     
  19. perchiegirl

    perchiegirl Coop Fortifier

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    I didn't hear of this. A carton of eggs these days is four bucks, here.

    deb
     
  20. Alaskan

    Alaskan New Member

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    Deb, Isn't that super expensive for that area? Up here they are just a few pennies under $5, but being in Alaska I expect everything to be more expensive.