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Hi! I have a question to ask the group. I live in colorado and looking to move to upstate New York, to be near family and such, but I really want to bring my chickens. I'd be hesitate to move if I couldn't bring my children. We will be moving them ourselves in our pickup, making a house to fit in the truck for them. I've looked up over the Internet if there is anything against moving them a crossed that many state lines, but I didn't find too much. So I wanted to ask anyone if they have had any problems they had with moving chickens. Or if anyone lives in Ny do you have problems with outside city limits chicken living?thanks for any info that anyone has! :D
 

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Have you thought of checking with the NY County you will be moving to? Or checking with that Counties local Bar Association? County and City Zoning is certainly something you will want to check into. Urban Chickens have actually become more acceptable almost everywhere. However, there are many locals that ban or discourage Roosters. Many also limit the number in your flock, how far the coop most be from homes surrounding you and wether the "kids" can run loose. Check with the County if you are outside city limits, and the City if you are within. Good Luck!
 

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First, I would suggest against making a house for the back of your truck. This will be a scary experience for them and the last thing you want if them being hauled inside a coop/house. They will learn to hate the coop. They need to be in small cages, like dog crates. They need to be small so the chickens wont be flying around hurting themselves. You also need to cover them in a way where they can get air but not the breeze the interstate will produce. Personally I would haul them inside of a vehicle in the cages. For that kind of distance in the back of a truck seems like the stress would kill them. Unless you had a camper top for the truck, even then the inside would get super hot!

And like the previous posted said, check out the ordnance ahead of time where you would be living. If your moving in with family make sure they are 100% ok with it, and get them to set up a temp coop/run so when you get there the flock can be released immediately. It will need a cover since they will have no idea where they are and first instinct is flight to save their lives.

I guess you really need to think long and hard if you really want to make this move. If you are willing to not move if you cant take your flock, then it doesn't sound like you are really set on moving.

I wish you luck !
 

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Everything written so far is wise and agreeable. You didn't say how many birds you would want to transport. I've thought of a couple of other things to add, so I thought I would do it list style, incorporating all the points..
1) (the big one!) Regulations of county/township you might be living in, regardless of town or city. Then, if it looks like you might be within a town or city limits, find out their regs. (population limits? roos allowed) Animal Control departments of the gov't there would probably be a good starting point.
2) (another big one!) Check with every state you will be crossing/entering and find out:
a) Do they allow poultry transport across - and if yes (probably) what regulations?
b) Do they require vaccinations to cross the border? If so, especially vaccinations, you will need all paperwork to come from a vet, don't do vaccinations yourself.
c) Do they need testing and certs (ie, do they want your birds tested for West Nile?)
d) Maybe you will need vet certs of health? for each bird? That also means blood testing! (getting pricey)
3) The logistics of the trip (Everything Apyl said).

I've seen dark green sun/shade fabric rols in garden depts, maybe that would make good crate/cage covering, reducing sun AND wind (while still allowing air)and providing the calming affect of being darker.

Make sure that they are not riding in an area of the vehicle where the exhaust may get circled around and gas the birds. I recommend that they are not in whatever truck/trailor/moving van that is hauling your furniture. If you can get some kind of van like a passenger van but without all of the seats (do you know what I mean?) (again, depends on how many birds...) Make sure every crate/cage is securely tied in place. In case of a traveling mishap (or near mishap), you don't want to risk them being tossed around in their cages.

(I once traveled across several states with a number of siamese cats, years back, my experience)

Please, anyone else with experience, add anything you know of that I missed.

You can probably find the answers to all of the state, county/township and/or city ordinances online. Which you appear to have been doing. I did build a "house" on my small truck for the cats for my trip, but chickens are a whole different mentality and attitude.
 

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I made a long distance move twice with my flock. I agree to not use a big house where they could get spooked and fly around and hurt themselves. I had some in the van and some pulled behind the van in an open trailer. I used cages, dog crates and carriers. The ones in the trailer I covered up and let near the bottom open for air. Make sure the cages are strapped down good. I packed the chickens tight but not too tight. They all could lay down if they wanted but they seemed to feel more secure that way.
Take some vitamin water just in case and also cut up things like watermelon, cantelope, etc, to feed along the way to help keep them hydrated. All of mine made it safe and sound and I even had Momma's with chicks.
Be prepared for everyone wanting to come see your chickens at every rest area and gas station. ;) It will also take longer to reach your destination because I was always checking to make sure things were secure and feeding them fruits and veggies at almost every stop.
I didn't have to worry too much about regulations where I was moving so I can't help with that part.
 
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