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Welcome to the forum, kudos to you for rescuing those battery hens. Here in the states, most commercial fowl, don't even get the chance to be rescued.
 

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That lockdown is crazy thinking. If a wild bird that has the flu visits your property there is a higher probability of infecting your birds. It's one of those feel good things that doesn't really do much.

Doggone it, I wish I could remember her username. We have another member who has a bunch of battery hens. She's done quite well with them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That lockdown is crazy thinking. If a wild bird that has the flu visits your property there is a higher probability of infecting your birds. It's one of those feel good things that doesn't really do much.

Doggone it, I wish I could remember her username. We have another member who has a bunch of battery hens. She's done quite well with them.
Love your language with the ‘doggone it’. Might try and include that phrase with the locals here? Bird flu update, infections are east coast. I live south west England and we had a few dead gannets on the local beach last November, so okish here. I am letting my girls out in a overhang netting area in garden, they are really affectionate and jump on my lap for cuddles each day. Restrictions may lift in March and I shall go rescue some more.
 

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I've often wondered the same, but there is no mechanism for it. The commercial farm near here usually has five thousand birds at a time, they are only set up for destroying birds and grinding them up for fertilizer, (all under compliance with the state ag regulations), of course.
 

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The lay-per-day ratio in the US is ~80 eggs per 100 hens. The moment the egg laying slows down the chickens are 'spent' and slaughtered. Roosters don't get past their first day. Kipster is opening a farm in the US this month, they keep the roosters alive. I don't know what they do with the hens after the lay, maybe you can rescue them.
 
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