Tennessee Mille Fleur D’Uccle

Discussion in 'Chickens' started by Overmountain1, Sep 21, 2020.

  1. danathome

    danathome Active Member

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    I have never been to a show and it's unlikely I will go to one. The only bird shows I go to are in my backyard. Most of TN is unknown to me other than Henderson County and those that butt up against it. Any travel is done by my wife as I no longer drive due to health.
     
  2. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    If your wife ever gets a hankering to go to a show the Lawrenceburg one is worth it. Amazing birds and interesting people. It's a good place to connect with other breeders. Muscle Shoals isn't as big, if they're even still having a show. And would be a little further from you. Or little more out of the way to get to.
     

  3. Overmountain1

    Overmountain1 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks!

    I’ll be coming from the other direction, past Bristol Tn/Va; I live literally right off I-81, so I get to go south on 81, then west on 40! That’s about it! Hehe. There are a couple of alternative routes here and there that I will take- there’s a scenic route around Knoxville I took w my kids last time that was really pretty and an easy drive but I can’t recall where exactly.

    Also, I may well be stopping off down southwest of Knoxville to see a childhood friend of mine, and that could alter the routes a bit... she’s lived in and around Nashville for the past oh... 12 years or so now, so I know if there’s a faster way she will know it! She’s like a sister- or as I would imagine one to be anyway! I’m looking forward to seeing her, hopefully, so makes it a dual purpose trip at the least!
     
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  4. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Ugh, Nashville. I hated driving in Nashville even if all I was doing was driving through. It's one of the reasons we moved to where we are now. I didn't want one of us to have to need serious health care and have to drive to Nashville. Turns out, it was a good move for health care.

    81? I think that's the route we took when we moved from N. VA to N. GA. Well, at least part of it anyway. It's been a while so I don't remember just how we got there.
     
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  5. Poultry Judge

    Poultry Judge Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm glad to hear about Charlie! Dan, I am interested in the breeding you have done with your Seramas as it sounds most impressive, I would like to hear more about your process and how you started toward your current 14th generation. Overmountain1 has an interest in antique breeds and likes Banties, perhaps you can give her some advice on what types of antique strains might be an appropriate fit for her flock.
     
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  6. danathome

    danathome Active Member

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    As I posted earlier, I started with serama when my wife bought eggs off ebay. When the eggs arrived I told Kimmi I had doubts as the eggs were way too large to be serama; at least one set of eggs was. The eggs came from two different sources. The second batch were small serama eggs. The hatch was good. I know longer remember how many but at least 11 chicks from 22 eggs. As he chicks grew it was obvious that Kimmi had been cheated; most of the chicks were an obvious cross and worthless as far as breeding goes. I ended up with one really nice frizzle hen, a couple more hens that had a little potential and a single rooster worth crowing about. The frizzle was the only one of a decent size; 12 ounces and the others were well over a pound, the rooster almost two pounds. A sad looking bunch they were. The rest of the chicks-when adult, were given away. My present flock descends from the frizzle, the oversized rooster and two later additions(3 birds) from better eggs. From those five I used selective breeding practices to form the flock of today which is two roosters and eight hens; also a few of this years chicks and 2 new cockerels to keep the genetics healthy. My pride and joy for this year is a little splash silkied hen who has a frizzle head and shoulders; a sizzle serama (partially). And pardon my use of "sizzle" in reference to seramas. I've been told that sizzles are not serama, but a breed in progress-whatever. The average size of my serama is 10 ounces; ranging from 8 to 12 ounces. I breed to my own standards which is somewhat different from show birds. I'm out to please myself. Oddly, I now keep a waiting list of people who want to buy my chicks-I never seem to have enough to go around. The serama pay the feed bill for everyone else; turkeys, ducks, pigeons, peafowl, and other breed bantams.

    Time to check on my Lilli dog who has gone into labor-I think. New puppies-yeah!
     
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  7. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    You do realize pics of those new pups are mandatory, don't you?

    Good luck and pulling for her to have an easy day bringing those new babies into the world.
     
  8. danathome

    danathome Active Member

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    I will be sure to post pictures of Lilli and the new pups when they're born.

    This is Beep-beep-she matured at 9 ounces.
    1 beep-beep 1-7-20 6.5 oz.jpg
    One of the more important traits in serama, in my opinion, is size. Just about everything you read on serama mentions them as being the world's smallest chicken breed. This is untrue. Serama can produce the world's smallest chickens, but as a breed the majority of people raise serama that are not really small. With the tiny size comes fertility problems, sterility, low egg production, and high mortality during incubation. For those reasons many raise serama that are a pound in size or more.

    Size is the hardest trait to breed for. I want tiny so size has been a trait I strive for. In the beginning I thought that if I kept the tiniest from each generation I'd soon have a flock of tiny serama. Wrong-when I kept those tiniest of chicks almost 100% proved to be sterile. But by keeping birds that were just a little smaller than their parents with each generation, fertility has not been an issue. However, low egg production is. Most of my hens lay every other day or even every third day and that's fine with me. I let the hens brood their own eggs which amounts to 5-8 eggs in a clutch. My little frizzle hen just went broody on two eggs.
    What serama lack in production they make up for by frequency; they hatch and raise a new set of chicks every six weeks or sooner. So, where my starter birds were over a pound, my 14th generation are much smaller and getting smaller with each generation. As a trait, size is a work in progress.
     
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  9. Poultry Judge

    Poultry Judge Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks Dan for sharing your hard work! Do you belong to any Serama clubs? In Japan, it is mostly the retired folks, like myself and perhaps you, who have the time to dedicate to highly specialized breeding. The genetics are a huge issue, my Earl of Derby OEGs usually run about a twenty percent hatch rate due to the genetics of a bird standardized in 1611. I only had four hatch in 2020. I am trying to recover a white beak and feet gene that was purposefully bred out 150 years ago here in the States. Seramas are indeed a specialized art form. I'm sure the folks on the forum would love to see more pictures!
     
  10. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Well, PJ, the same could be said about your Earl of Derby birds. I don't think we've seen any pics from them.

    Seramas sound a great deal like Silkies in the laying realm. Although mine laid everyday and went broody every few weeks when they were young.
     
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  11. Overmountain1

    Overmountain1 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, most likely you would’ve taken 81 from NOVA. It’s the primary N/S route thru Va, and even traveling E-W, you’d likely end up on at least a stretch of it to transition! It’s sooo busy and soooooooo much truck traffic. I’m honestly amazed I haven’t been killed by a tractor trailer over the years here... They neeeeeed to make 81 3 lanes all the way. That is all.

    Wow guys! I am loving hearing more about your babies- now for pictures! Come on!!!! Load em up! Seramas, OEGs, AND puppies!!! Please and thank you. I love what I’ve seen so far!! I love that name, btw- adorable! Beep-beep is such a cutie!

    Charlie should be a good starting place for you with the Mille Fleur I think... altho I don’t know too much about breeding them yet. He’s got really good spangles so far, and definitely a good posture and carriage, and he seems like he will grow to a good size. And he’s a sweet boy, which doesn’t hurt. He’s the tallest of the 3 roos- one of whom is TinyRoo, and a porcelain, the other is partridge Cochin.


    Oh btw y’all, I figured out the Cochins sex! One of each. And opposite from what I would have predicted. The male is the sweetest, friendliest, and calmest roo I’ve ever seen. He just plops right down on your hand or lap and soaks up the love! For as long as you’ll let him. The pullet is a bit more shy, and not quite as affectionate, but still a big sweetheart! I’ll take a second round of pics for you to compare with the earlier ones.

    Hope you’re all having a good day! It’s a rainy rainy day here....

    Having some hawk issues, we had to shoot (at) one yesterday... no, it is not a protected breed, and yes, we really really hate to do anything like that. Hate it- but love our chickens just a little more than that hate!
    But we have tried and tried to get it to move on but it seems their nesting spot is just down the valley here, and bc we have only one small crab apple tree we have very little cover. Almost none.
    Yesterday he was stalking Chip and Jackie in their pen. He kept circling and perching right around them, waiting for us to let them out in the morning as we usually do... but thankfully the rain meant we didn’t let them out anyway.
    Additionally, we are unsure if we even hit, or hurt, the hawk. I plan to hang some old CDs around here as a few have suggested, but with no trees that makes it a bit of a challenge to keep a fully covered zone, I just don’t have spots to use for hanging.
    **And anyone who reads this, please know we do not condone our own actions, but nor do we need anyone getting angry w me. I hate killing trees, much less a beautiful creature. Truly. Don’t want to have to, which is why I’m asking. Thanks.
     
  12. Poultry Judge

    Poultry Judge Moderator Staff Member

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    The CDs may help, hopefully. I have almost total tree cover which really helps here. The hawks do hunt quite a bit in the horse pastures.
     
  13. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Sometimes I look back at how I'd just hit the road, no map type hitting the road and end up at my destination.

    It sounds like you need a murder of crows hanging out around your place. They are very effective on keeping hawks away. As long as I had crows hanging at our place in TN I had few problems with hawks. As to shooting, to protect your won, do it. Almost all states have laws that allow for dispatching of predators that are threatening our livestock.

    Yes, our chickens are livestock even though we don't think of them that way.
     
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  14. Poultry Judge

    Poultry Judge Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, they are indeed livestock under the law. The Trumbull County Ag Commissioner used to remind me that if my Emus ever got a disease, the State would be obligated to destroy them. Which was always why I was so picky about their health.
     
  15. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    That's pretty much true of several poultry diseases. ILT is one that some states give you no choice. Others are more of we suggest it.
     
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  16. Poultry Judge

    Poultry Judge Moderator Staff Member

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    With the Emus, the concern was being able to handle them without getting injured. They wouldn't have been able to move them easily. We used to move them with a horse trailer when we had to and it was always an adventure and never any fun.
     
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  17. danathome

    danathome Active Member

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    This is my main serama rooster who normally stands tall.

    pppablo.jpg

    Personality is also a trait I think is very important. With my first serama chicks, some were downright mean. One in particular would fly straight at my face, talons out, the minute the cage door was opened. He went down the road in a hurry. Personality is definitely a trait I look for in a potential breeder-docile, friendly, and outgoing. Pablo is much like a tame parrot in that he will hop on my shoulder or lap the lower his head to get it scratched and rubbed. It took about two generations to get rid of meaness in my birds. Some of my chicks are skittish but most are almost naturally tame requiring very little handling to bring out their friendly, outgoing personality.
     
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  18. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    I didn't think about their size being an issue. It certainly could be a challenge if one had to be treated everyday. I guess Emu squeeze shoots would be helpful.
     
  19. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Those were always the ones that dug deep into my heart. Show no fear, come right up and start chatting about their day. Wait, I can't see you well enough, I'm coming up into your lap.

    Very pretty boy. If I ever forgot why I got out of them Seramas would be a good fit for me.
     
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  20. danathome

    danathome Active Member

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    lilli.jpg
    2 boys and 5 girls. Mom is a Maltese and dad is a Dachsie.