Limping Orpington

Discussion in 'Emergencies, Illness, Meds & Cures' started by vmjllc, Apr 20, 2017.

  1. vmjllc

    vmjllc New Member

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    I have a Buff Orpington that is limping & favoring her left foot. I've checked her feet and I'm not seeing anything wrong. Any ideas or suggestions ?
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    I'd check the bottom of her left foot for bumblefoot. It'll look like a dark in color circular scab, it can be any size. There might be redness around it also. If that's the case, minor surgery needs to be done, the sooner the better as the infection can spread up her leg. Once the infection gets past her leg and into her system, she will die. No amount of antibiotics can stop it.
    If there's no scab, it's very possible she may have jumped down from a high roost or other high location and sprained or pulled a ligament or tendon.
    If that's the case, put her in a cage or crate restricting her movement, this will keep her from moving around too much, preventing further injury to her leg. Provide her with water and feed. Clean the cage as needed.
    You can purchase vitamin B complex tablets at a pharmacy. Crush several tablets into powder and sprinkle the powder on the feed for her to eat. I dont recommend plain vitamin B. The vitamin B complex may help her heal more quickly. Dont let her out of the cage for 7 days. It takes TIME for these type injuries to heal. At day 7, take her out of the cage to see if she walks normal. If not, recage her for 10 days and continue the vitamin B complex treatment. After 10 days, take her out of the cage and see if she can walk normal. if not, stop the vitamin B complex treatment.
    If she hasnt healed or made improvement after the third week, she's not going to heal due to the severity of the injury. You're going to have to make a decision whether to let her go with the rest of the flock or cull her. The flock will pick on her because of her limping, this is normal. Healthy birds instinctively do not want a sick or injured bird in the flock, it will attract predators.
    I've dealt with these type of leg injuries. I've had good success with hens, not so good with roosters.
    I've dealt with bumblefoot also. If she has it, I can help you with that too. Good luck.
     

  3. chickenqueen

    chickenqueen Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah,what Dawg said.Keep her confined with food/water near.I just put one back in my flock that had a leg injury.Don't return her to the flock too quickly or it will be re-injured again.Give her an extra week or two after she quits limping.Give her a baby aspirin twice a day.It really helps!
     
  4. vmjllc

    vmjllc New Member

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    I had checked for bumblefoot and no sign of it. However, we figured out her problem this morning... finally ! Apparently one of the rings we had around her ankle for identification hadn't fallen off like I thought. It had made itself up high in her leg under the feather's & was tight ! We managed to get it off, but I'm not sure if there's permanent damage. Do I need to cage her up to let it heal? I'm not seeing the other hens picking on her, but maybe because she's my largest hen.
     
  5. seminolewind

    seminolewind SuperModerator Staff Member

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    I had one get inbedded/tight on one of my hens years ago. It healed right away.
     
  6. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    I dont recommend baby aspirin for birds with strains or sprains. You want birds to feel pain. If they try to stand, walk or flop around while caged after taking aspirin and feeling no pain, there's an excellent possibility of causing a more severe injury. They need peace and quiet, R&R while caged.
    With these types of injuries, it is "time" that heals.
     
  7. vmjllc

    vmjllc New Member

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    I guess I'll just keep any eye on her then and see if she's showing signs of healing. This explains why she spent much of her day on the top roost. It hurt her too much to get down after being up there all night. I've physically brought her down several times so she could eat/drink. I thought she was just neurotic...lol.
     
  8. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    Vmjllc. I recommend lowering roosts, not only for your BO, but for other heavy standard breeds you own.
    The normal recommended roost height is around 18". Personally, I lowered all my roosts down to 6"-7" and havnt had any foot/leg problems since dropping them.
     
  9. vmjllc

    vmjllc New Member

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    I have it starting at 16", 16" from that one to the next, 3 total. For some reason most of them like the upper roost.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. nannypattyrn

    nannypattyrn Well-Known Member

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    It's natural for them to get as high off the grd as they can. It's a protective thing that's programmed into their instincts.
     
  11. vmjllc

    vmjllc New Member

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    I measured and the highest one is 54" off the floor of the coop. Is that way to high for them ? I might be able to lower it if needed.
     
  12. nannypattyrn

    nannypattyrn Well-Known Member

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    Mine look similar to yours and I haven't had many problems, but you could take the top rung off a put it on the bottom if there's room. That way they don't have a choice. It's just natural for them to go to the highest rung.
     
  13. MikeA_15

    MikeA_15 New Member

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    For standard breeds, I've always preferred roosts no more than 2' off the floor. Deep pine shavings combined with that prevent injuries and bumble foot. I don't set roosts in a ladder formation either. Birds get injured by other birds landing on them. For that many birds, they are too confined in that roost area. Space out the roosts. 2x4 wood set on edge with corners filed down smooth work very well.
     
  14. seminolewind

    seminolewind SuperModerator Staff Member

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    I agree with MikeA. My chickens have been happy with their roost about the height of the top of my knee. I've had a lot of heavy breeds .
     
  15. vmjllc

    vmjllc New Member

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    Hmmm...alrighty then. I guess I'll be lowering my roost heights next Thursday when my husband is home. Thanks everyone for sharing thoughts !
     
  16. akatebris

    akatebris New Member

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    Hi all, I have just got 6 battery hens a couple of weeks ago. 2 weeks ago when I let them out one couldn't put any weight on her leg. She is unable to dig around for food and hasn't moved a lot for 2 weeks. She is drinking and eating. Is there anything I can do? Will be recover? We've checked her feet there isn't anything there. She can pull her leg up and grab with her foot but hasn't been weight baring for 2 weeks now. Any advice would be great. Thanks.
     
  17. seminolewind

    seminolewind SuperModerator Staff Member

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    It could be anything, genetic, injury, illness, a sore on the foot pad. It's hard to guess at what it is.
     
  18. chickenqueen

    chickenqueen Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Confine her,limiting her movement so she can rest the affected leg.Giving her a baby aspirin in the morning and at night will help with any pain and swelling.Leg injuries are very common.NEVER,NEVER grab your chickens by the legs,the most common cause of leg injuries.
     
  19. akatebris

    akatebris New Member

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    We've confined her to a dogs crate. She still not able to put weight on it. It's been just over 2 weeks but since confining her she is attempting to put more weight on. Let's hope she's okay! Can't believe people would grab them by their legs.
     
  20. seminolewind

    seminolewind SuperModerator Staff Member

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    Yeah, and that's not the only way they collect chickens. Some have this giant chicken vacuum that sucks them up. How awful!