Lights for the coop

Discussion in 'General Chicken Discussion' started by tennbowhunter, Jan 25, 2020.

  1. tennbowhunter

    tennbowhunter New Member

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    What are y’all using for light inside the coop at night?
    Thanks
    Steve
     
  2. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Nothing. Birds need to sleep just as we do and having lights on during the night would keep them from getting the sleep they need.
     
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  3. tennbowhunter

    tennbowhunter New Member

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    I thought I read in another post that a dim light made them feel safer when you put them up for the night in their coop.
    I’m new to raising chickens so I’m reading as much as I can. I have three right now. I think one is a rooster, one not sure what breed and a buff Orpington
     
  4. Sylie

    Sylie Super Moderator Staff Member

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    On the coldest nights (20 degrees or below) I put a red heat lamp on for them but I have a special set up, heat lamps can be dangerous and special precautions need to be taken. My husband built my coop with a heat lamp in mind, it is surrounded by metal sheeting and small gauge hardware cloth so that if something happens and it blows up it won't set the coop on fire and the shards won't get anywhere near the girls. They can't knock it down or bump into it or anything.
    Chickens don't see well in the dark, almost not at all so the red bulb helps keep things dim enough that they sleep. ( I have an article about chicken eyesight somewhere, it's very interesting, I can look for it if you like).

    Black light bulbs work well also if all that you are looking for is a little light in the coop but as for making them feel safe, not really. Being enclosed in their house where they cuddle together is all they need for that.
     
  5. tennbowhunter

    tennbowhunter New Member

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    Ok, So with the plexiglass window on the coop door that should be enough light.
    Just trying to do the best for my girls. They are about 4 months old
    We have a lot to learn. Luckily the next door neighbor has chickens.
     
  6. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    You've got a good resource then if your neighbor has good experience with them. Don't be afraid to ask here or the neighbor.

    Sounds like you want the best for them so if you have any concerns give someone a shout. The light really isn't necessary, especially if the one is a male. He'd be awake crowing all night long. Watch what happens during a full moon on a cloudless night.

    Oh, and pics are always nice. I'm notorious for getting the sex wrong on anything that isn't a Silkie.
     
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  7. Sylie

    Sylie Super Moderator Staff Member

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    With a window in the door they can tell when it's light enough to want to go outside in the morning. That's really only a problem if you don't get out there and let them out, they get a little stir crazy and may pick on each other. It may also encourage predators, as the chickens move around in there, a passing predator may be able to see in and go "WOOT! breakfast!" I have 2 windows and a glass (fortified on the inside with hardware cloth so they can't break it and if a predator like a dog jumps at the door from the outside, the shards won't get into the coop and neither will the dog hehe) and I find that they pick at each other's combs if I don't get them out at the first sign of daylight. There are creative options for the windows if you want to do something. Weather proof curtains on the outside for one. That film they put on car windows to darken them is another. If you really want to get fancy there are many many different window films with different designs and pictures out there. Most of them are "static cling" types so you can take them off when you want to. Here is a link to Amazon that has a bunch of nice ones:
    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=decorati...=c&hvqmt=e&tag=mh0b-20&ref=pd_sl_2xm0prpgim_e

    Most of them are one way view, the girls could see out through it but nothing outside can see in. Of course, if you are trying to keep the girls from seeing out, then anything outside would be able to see in, that's up to you and how many predators you expect to have (and don't forget the ones you don't expect!)
     
  8. tennbowhunter

    tennbowhunter New Member

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    The rooster is attacking the new hen we just got two days ago! He has made her bleed twice and my daughter isn’t liking it!
    I put her in a pet carrier hoping they would get used to her. The two hens are ok, it’s just the boy
     
  9. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Lock the boy up if she is getting along with the other girls. Sometimes a time out is enough to adjust a bad bird's attitude. You might have to remove him to where he can't see or hear the girls to make it work well.

    If that doesn't work then he probably needs to find a new home. That kind of aggression displayed to a female could mean he's going to start that kind of behavior to the humans.

    And for future reference, rarely can you just plunk a new bird down in an established flock. They consider that bird an interloper. It takes slow introduction for things to go well for the new bird. And it can get complicated on how to go about it.
     
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  10. Sylie

    Sylie Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Robin is exactly right on all counts there, I couldn't have said it better. If you want to take him out of the equation for a few days and introduce him as the new member of the flock, that may go over better especially considering all of the hens get along. If he still attacks the same hen after being reintroduced then there's a problem and you should rehome him. If he starts getting nasty with a different girl then he's just a jerk and you should rehome.
     
  11. tennbowhunter

    tennbowhunter New Member

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    We separated the boy from the girls. Will let him stay out a while and reintroduce him as a new flock member in a couple of days
     
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  12. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Good. Leave him separate for at least a week. Let the girls really establish their group.

    When you turn him back in with them I think you already you're going to have to watch him. If he goes back to attacking her it's time for him to find a new home.
     
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  13. Frank Alvarez

    Frank Alvarez New Member

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    I have read that to lay eggs thru the shorter days of the year , an artificial light at night to give them a total of 14 hours of light per day is needed. The comment about them needing to sleep seems to contradict this . Any comments?
     
  14. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Tennbowhunter is asking about 24/7.

    I never used artificial lights to extend their daylight hours. After years of discussing back and forth the benefits and negatives the one realization surfaced, the shorter days are a rest period for the girls. Using lights to keep them laying year round burned them out faster.

    Since most of us considered them pets we chose to let nature rule.
     
  15. Frank Alvarez

    Frank Alvarez New Member

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    OMG! I have over 40 pet chickens and guineas(LOL) but I do not use artificial lights anymore either since there are always 2-3 chickens laying even in the winter and that is more than enough just for my family.
     
  16. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    LOL Very few of us can say they're not pets. Especially the Guineas, they're my favorites.

    What the light time for those that want them to keep laying is increasing the daylight hours to 14 hours. Not keep them burning an additional 14 hours.
     
  17. Sylie

    Sylie Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I am a firm believer in letting them rest through the winter if they so choose. My chicklings (less than a year old but laying) lay every day regardless of light but my older girls slow down to almost no eggs in winter. I do use supplemental light but it's only a red heat lamp and only on the coldest of nights. I feel like to force them to lay by using artificial light is akin to commercial egg plants. It's not good for them.
    Just my 2 cents :)
     
  18. tennbowhunter

    tennbowhunter New Member

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    Well I guess he just doesn’t like the new hen! We left him separated for a week. As soon as we put him back with the other two he attacked the same hen!!!!
    He is going to have to go!!
     
  19. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Unfortunately. Maybe you can find someone to swap with.

    If you really don't want to rehome him and have a good place for him to hang for a month you can give that a try.
     
  20. Sylie

    Sylie Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah, a week may be a little short for a roo. Did you have him separated where he could not see or hear the girls?

    I'm sorry that it didn't work as quickly and easily.