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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
I've read that goose eggs can be a challenge even if not shipped.

CQ, I'm assuming that the geese will go broody, what are you going to do about that? Let them set and sell off the young?
 

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NO GOSLINGS!!!I plan on collecting the eggs.That way they lay more.Not really sure after that but I do know-NO GOSLINGS!!!I always said I'd try anything once,twice if I like it.I tried geese and I love them dearly but I won't do it again.If I let them raise the goslings,I'd worry constantly about them getting eaten/drowned by turtles.I'm not going to do it.It's a good thing they can live 40 yrs or more and I have enough geese.
 

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I think it takes a few hours for a goose to lay an egg. They actually take naps while sitting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
One of the keets is sick. And being Guineas with no definitive indicator on what is wrong all I can do is watch.
 

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Can you tell if it's the one you had problems with in the beginning?What's it doing?Is it time for them to start laying/molt?That effects all birds,even my exotics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
No, it's one of the others.

That's the problem, it isn't doing anything that points in any direction. No ruffled feathers indicating an infection. It stands quietly by itself. I've had to go in the woods to bring it home a couple of times. It's thin but was eating and drinking this morning. Laying at this time of year for Guineas at this age is a probably not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
I doubt it. I would expect to see something from the others and considering their age it would be hard to have that much overload to cause physical symptoms.

My suspicion is that it's genetic. I saw the penguin stance two weeks ago, haven't seen it since.
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Well, scratch everything I said. Doesn't mean I won't find it dead under the roost tomorrow but the bird is doing better. Strong appetite, not hunkered down while the others are up being rocket birds.

A thought flitted through my mind when I first noticed the bird was off that something might have gotten hold of it or that it flew into something and got the snot knocked out of it. I have noticed it does seem to have a long distance vision problem. I don't think that's always been the case or I would have noticed it before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
I don't throw treatments at any of my birds unless I have a reasonable idea what might be going on. There is absolutely no indication the bird has cocci. My early thought that something physical happened to the bird is becoming stronger and stronger as the bird is getting harder and harder to tell from the others.

Appetite is huge. It even leaves the flock to go into the pen to eat. Did that several times today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
An update on the keets for those contemplating and training Guineas for themselves.

99% of the time in the afternoon I can go out and call "birds, come on" and if they're where they can hear me in a few minutes they arrive home. The times they don't come home are those late days due to hub's med treatment. If I can't be here by 3:30 or 4 I have no chance of getting them out of the trees.
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
Guineas are tough birds. They don't even need treatment for mites due to their diligent dust bathing. And the grooming the practice on each other.

I treat when I can identify something to treat for. The same as I do with my chickens. I am dead set against throwing drugs at anything unless I can identify what the problem is. If it means taking a fecal sample to the vet, then I do that. If it means taking a bird to the vet, then I do that too.

Years ago I did treat a Guinea hen for an eye infection. She is the only Guinea that ever needed medical intervention by me or a vet.
 

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I normally throw everything in the kitchen sink if they're on their way out.

Whats interesting is the necropsy lab vet told me people with backyard flocks should treat for coccidiosis on a regular basis (most likely every 4 months). He said the limited space makes for chickens carrying higher loads of coccidiosis that may not affect them at the time but stress or ailments can cause their release.

I spoke with him an hour and a half when my silkie died. I didn't quite focus on what he said, however, looking back at 5 necrosis he's done for me, an increased level of coccidiosis was something they all had in common. Aside from his statement and my necropsies, I don't know anymore than that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #78 ·
When a bird is immuno compromised there is a very high probability that the cocci that exists in the gut can multiply rapidly. That's why a bird that's been down can end up with an overload of cocci, not because of the environment.

Think about it, I have birds that are approaching ancient with one heading towards 13, none of them have ever been treated for cocci. How much more proof does anyone need? If they are fed well, have fresh air, and relatively clean environments they can live healthy lives.
 
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