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Ow long does it take to molt? I have only gotten maybe a dozen eggs from 10 hens in two months . I know they are molting but dang I am getting tired of buying feed and no results. 7 of the 10 girls are just over a year old. None of them are production breeds all are marens wyandotte barred rock Orpington or brahma. I was getting 8+ eggs a day now I am lucky to get 2 per week.
 

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Its also Winter. The shorter day time hours plays a big part in laying. This is the time of year that the girls' bodies get a break from the work of producing eggs. Then when the days get longer they will be strong enough to produce high quality eggs.
 

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Molting can take anywhere from 7 to 12 weeks. Also like the previous poster mentioned, length of light matter as well. Then when you mix the two, yes with a small flock it does mean buying eggs again while still having to feed the flock. Luckily thought as long as you provide ideal conditions with the needed light and nutrients your flock with up and running again. If you have not already supplied supplemental lighting please be aware it does take time for the hens to get back into laying . Adding the extra light is not an instant fix.
 

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Temps really are not the issue unless it is in extreme. Hours of lighting plays a much larger roll. But if your flock laid well without extra lighting that's awesome, one less thing you have to deal with. So as long as they have their feed and fresh water, just waiting on molting is a pretty good deal.
 

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Birds at a year or younger are more apt to lay during the shorter days of Winter. Then once they begin to mature egg laying during the shorter days drops a lot.

None of mine are laying right now. They are all over two years old.
 

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Jeremysbrinkman said:
Last year my girls laid right on through winter. Our tempetures have only reached the 70s at night.
Last year of course they laid through the winter-it was their first year of lay. They don't slow down for molting or winter (even if you don't supplement light) in the first year. From what I've read, a lot of people will always have chicks coming to the point of lay as their older hens go into molt, that way the older ones can take their break, yet you still have young ones that will lay right through. Easy way to make sure you have a continuous cycle of eggs, just make sure you always have POL hens starting as your older ones slow.
 
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