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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The past few days I have noticed that one of our girls is getting beat up by our rooster. He comes out of nowhere and attacks her for apparently no reason. Now it seems as though 2 of the other girls are picking up on his behavior and are doing the same then he jumps in too. Any ideas why?
 

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Have you checked her out? Does she have any injuries? Chickens will attack an injuried chicken. If the rooster is the instigator either pen him seprately or make him dinner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Injuries as in like a broken leg, injured, or like scabs on the back of her head from getting pecked, injured? Cause if that's the case, she has a few scabs and I spotted some dried blood on her comb yesterday. I sprayed that purple antibacterial/antifungal stuff on her and everyone seemed to back off a bit. I will be sure to do it a few more times throughout the day. I feel sad for her and mad at the others for doing this. Any idea what would cause the sudden turn on her?:cool:
 

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Injuries as in like a broken leg, injured, or like scabs on the back of her head from getting pecked, injured? Cause if that's the case, she has a few scabs and I spotted some dried blood on her comb yesterday. I sprayed that purple antibacterial/antifungal stuff on her and everyone seemed to back off a bit. I will be sure to do it a few more times throughout the day. I feel sad for her and mad at the others for doing this. Any idea what would cause the sudden turn on her?:cool:
Sometimes there's just something about the one being picked on that the other chickens can discern - a disability, a weakness or illness - but we humans can't. Sometimes it's because they are very low in the pecking order.
Unless I have no other choice, I don't remove the injured bird. This only makes things worse on her when she's re-introduced. I prefer instead to isolate the bird, but within the coop. Wire crates are great for this, as is a partition where the other birds can still see the injured member, but not get to her to cause further injury. If you can identify the most aggressive bird attacking this hen, that's the one I would remove - the pecker, not the peckee. A few days removed from the flock can knock the pecker down a few notches on the pecking order.
It's easy to get mad at the ones doing the most harm, but it really does not good. They have their own set of rules in the chicken world. The best we can do is help protect the low-ranking flock members from harm.
By the way, if the blu-kote stuff doesn't aid healing I would suggest you switch to good old fashioned pine tar. Stinky, messy and difficult to apply, but I've yet to find a bird that wanted more than one taste of the foul-tasting stuff. Stops pecking in a hurry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bird_slave said:
Sometimes there's just something about the one being picked on that the other chickens can discern - a disability, a weakness or illness - but we humans can't. Sometimes it's because they are very low in the pecking order.
Unless I have no other choice, I don't remove the injured bird. This only makes things worse on her when she's re-introduced. I prefer instead to isolate the bird, but within the coop. Wire crates are great for this, as is a partition where the other birds can still see the injured member, but not get to her to cause further injury. If you can identify the most aggressive bird attacking this hen, that's the one I would remove - the pecker, not the peckee. A few days removed from the flock can knock the pecker down a few notches on the pecking order.
It's easy to get mad at the ones doing the most harm, but it really does not good. They have their own set of rules in the chicken world. The best we can do is help protect the low-ranking flock members from harm.
By the way, if the blu-kote stuff doesn't aid healing I would suggest you switch to good old fashioned pine tar. Stinky, messy and difficult to apply, but I've yet to find a bird that wanted more than one taste of the foul-tasting stuff. Stops pecking in a hurry.
Thank you for that information. I did remove her a few days ago because I was afraid they would wind up killing her. Once one started messing with her, others chimed in, so I felt she was in danger. I do let them all out to free range all together and they have minor tiffs but I think I am going to keep her separate until the hole in her head heals a bit. I am pretty sure she was pretty high on the pecking order. I don't know what she did to make the others mad. Lol. I have been putting neosporin on her. It's helping but ill try the pine tar. I'm wondering if I should give her a bath and clean her up a bit. She looks beat up.
 

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Thank you for that information. I did remove her a few days ago because I was afraid they would wind up killing her. Once one started messing with her, others chimed in, so I felt she was in danger. I do let them all out to free range all together and they have minor tiffs but I think I am going to keep her separate until the hole in her head heals a bit. I am pretty sure she was pretty high on the pecking order. I don't know what she did to make the others mad. Lol. I have been putting neosporin on her. It's helping but ill try the pine tar. I'm wondering if I should give her a bath and clean her up a bit. She looks beat up.
If she were mine, I wouldn't stress her out more with a bath right now. Maybe some spot cleaning with a damp washcloth?
I would not recommend the pine tar for a head wound. Everywhere else is great, it has anti-microbial properties to speed healing, but not on the head where it might get in her eyes.
A product that is a bit pricey, but worth keeping a bottle on hand is called Vetericyn. The 8 oz. bottle I have cost somewhere around $18, but a little goes a long way and I've had this bottle for well over a year. I use it on the dogs, cats, and my fowl. Heals wounds so fast you won't believe your eyes. It's also effective against staph (MRSA), e.coli and fungus.
Good luck with your hen.
 
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