Chicken Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My three quail eggs are 5 days old and I can see their hearts beating but they seem stuck to their shells when I turn them. I just wanna know its normal or ok. There hearts are beating normally.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,580 Posts
They're fine. It's far too early for them to be stuck.

I guess what I need from you is to describe why you think they're stuck. They really are not free floating in there so if you move the egg the embryo doesn't move with it. It's in a fixed position to protect it from bumps and bangs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
They're fine. It's far too early for them to be stuck.

I guess what I need from you is to describe why you think they're stuck. They really are not free floating in there so if you move the egg the embryo doesn't move with it. It's in a fixed position to protect it from bumps and bangs.
when I move them around the yolk and baby don't move around its like they are attached to the shell but your right I looked up videos of handling and it seems normal
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,580 Posts
I know I am, I've hatched a ton of peeps in incubators over the years.

If you see an embryo moving around that means the air cell is blown and peep more than likely won't hatch. Some do but it's not common.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I know I am, I've hatched a ton of peeps in incubators over the years.

If you see an embryo moving around that means the air cell is blown and peep more than likely won't hatch. Some do but it's not common.
well for the first 4 days the embryo was floating around in the shell when I would turn it the baby would always end up pointed up but now its attached itself inside it shell. Is that normal? like the baby isn't exactly attacked it just seems the yolk is attached the baby flops about but still stays in the same spot
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,580 Posts
You've got to quit messing with them. All that jostling and examining isn't good for them. Put them back. In a few days candle to see if they are still viable. They should all have the same level of development.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
ok i put them in the makeshift incubator box and yesterday when I candled them one was significantly larger than the other two
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,580 Posts
That could be a problem. Usually if they are still alive and you see that much development in one and not the others it's because they are not being kept equally warm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
thats what i was thinking i think my body temps too cool definantly will not be doing it this way next time
I have been using these past three days bags of hot rice and old shirts to monitor temp and prob next time I may do duck eggs
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,580 Posts
Duck eggs hatch a lot later than quail eggs. That's dedicating a long time incubating the way you are now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
i think i learned my lesson i will buy a incubator next time cause this is killing me but I'm happy to have this experience aswell. the ricebags work really well it takes them 3 hours to go from 101 to 96 degrees so I'm just gonna keep doing that
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,580 Posts
Yeah, you're choice was certainly challenging. Like you said in the early going, it gave you something different to do during this virus mess.
 

·
Serama King
Joined
·
965 Posts
There are many incubators available. A seven egg incubator can sometime be bought for less than twenty dollars. However, if you can afford to get a good brand. Those twenty dollar jobs work, but they do not last long.

What kind of quail eggs do you have? Those that have dark, speckled shells can be difficult to get a good image when candling.

I agree with Robin on the duck eggs. I'd recommend that you try Bobwhite quail or bantam eggs-eggs that are white. These eggs are easier to candle and learn with. An egg that is developing will develop distinct veins that are easy to see. This veining can be seen as early as the fifth day of incubation. Should a developing egg die, this veining breaks down quickly and the veins can no longer be seen. So, visible veins means the egg is alive and growing. No visible veins means the egg is infertile or has died and should be discarded. Once an embryo in an egg dies gasses form inside the egg shell. In time it can explode-and what a mess and stink.

Good luck with your eggs.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top