Hello everyone!

Discussion in 'Beginners Forum' started by tannert, May 19, 2020.

  1. tannert

    tannert New Member

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    Our Cinnamon Queen chicks our arriving tomorrow!
    We have the brooder set up in the bathroom with a hard heating pad. Any tips for using this type of heat source for the little gals?
     
  2. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Congratulations on the soon to arrive chicks and welcome to the forum.

    I'm unfamiliar with a "hard heating pad" what are they? Are they temp controlled?
     

  3. tannert

    tannert New Member

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    It looks like a flatscreen tv and has two settings. I’m unsure of the best place to set it up.
     
  4. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Is it on legs? Or does it lay flat on the floor?

    Can you do a pic or post the name of what it is you're looking at using? If it doesn't have a temp control it probably won't be the right thing to use.

    What are you using for a brooder?
     
  5. tannert

    tannert New Member

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    IMG_1589927380.542118.jpg

    It’s called a cozy coop heated panel. It’s supposedly great for baby chicks but our thermometer is barely reaching 90 F when it’s facing toward the coop.
     
  6. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    The biggest problem is that it isn't meant to be used in a brooder. It's a warming device for older birds in sub zero temps. Although in looking at it I don't think it works all that great for that either.

    The only thing I could suggest is laying it across the top of the brooder, you'd have a better chance of getting the temp up. But since it doesn't have a dial adjustable thermostat you'll have to figure out how to raise it to keep it from being too warm or to reduce temps as peeps get their feathers.

    How many peeps in that brooder? With just the feeder and waterer base in there it already looks tight.
     
  7. tannert

    tannert New Member

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    Putting it on top of the lid heats up the area much better !
    Will try to find a way to prop it up higher when they’re older. We have four coming in.
     
  8. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Good. Otherwise you'd have to go with a bell lamp with a red 65 watt bulb.

    The bin might be OK for one or two weeks. Are these days olds? If not then there is a lot less time for it to be big enough.

    BTW, pics are one of those things we always enjoy. Just a hint.
     
  9. Sylie

    Sylie Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I am a little concerned about the size of the bin also. Can you tell me what dimensions it is? (would say it on the sticker on the side) I have always brooded chicks in bins similar to that and it works out fine, but I really can't tell from the picture what the width and length is, depth looks okay for a month or so. As soon as they can hit the lid when jumping, it's time for a bigger brooder. Please be careful putting the heat source on the lid, I realize it's metal but metal can transfer heat in all directions and you don't want to melt the lip of the bin (ask me how I know!). I have never used one of those heat plates before but have looked at them as an alternative to heat bulbs. It's nice that they won't start a fire if tipped over.
    Also, keep in mind that you will have trouble regulating the heat inside the bin with the completely open lid. Heat rises and it will escape out the other end leaving the bin too cool, I would suggest putting something over the end that does not have the heat plate (a piece of sheet metal, tin, even tin foil would work).
     
  10. tannert

    tannert New Member

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    They are day olds.
    And the plastic box dimensions are 32x18x22 in
    Thanks for the help!
     
  11. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Yeah, they're going to outgrow that bin fast. Tape up the drain for the tub, put down a couple of bath mats and let them have the tub. Then when they're ready to move out you can scoop out the shavings, vacuum up those left and then give the tub a good bath.
     
  12. Sylie

    Sylie Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I've tried that before, it doesn't work, tubs are not deep enough to keep them in there, they get tall enough in about 2 weeks to jump up and hit their heads on whatever you are using for a "roof". Plus, once they start scratching at the shavings they get down to the bathmats and eat them o_O and obviously, the bathtub itself is too slippery for their little feetsies.