Ghost Chili for Chicken?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering' started by Tiff, May 18, 2020.

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  1. Tiff

    Tiff New Member

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    I doubt it’d be much of a good idea to give her any ghost chili peppers, cause I spent all day severely burning from it soaking me. Someone in my previous Botany class mentioned giving her birds peppers because birds don’t taste capsicum. Only mammals do because we have teeth to chew seeds the plants want to live on, birds can eat and defecate them out, so they aren’t targeted.
    But man is that pepper hot. I’d imagine bell peppers are fine, but is it ok for me to give her any?
     
  2. Sarah1up

    Sarah1up Member

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    Dude, I’d have to have a little more scientific evidence than that to feel comfortable. Have you googled anything about it? It wouldn’t surprise me but, like I said, I would be hesitant.
     
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  3. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    I've heard of others using ground red pepper as a wormer. Does it work? No clue. But I haven't wormed my birds in years after reading a study done on horses. I just wanted to see how it worked out with chickens.

    I'm also cautious like Sarah when it comes to giving my birds something I can't be sure of. They can't tell us not to do it again. And the outcome could be a negative one.
     
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  4. Sylie

    Sylie Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I would not give them ghost peppers, the seeds do have the most capsicum and heat but the flesh itself does too and in a ghost pepper, you are looking at possibly blistering their tongues, soft tissues of their throats etc. Even if they don't taste it, the chemicals are still there and will do the damage.
    Please don't do it.
     
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  5. TomC

    TomC Active Member

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    I don't see any benefit in giving them the peppers. As far as I know, there is nothing in the peppers, vitamins, minerals, etc., that they can't get elsewhere. The risk for unknown harm is to great, especially, if they can't taste it and have the opportunity to spit it back out. Even if they could taste it, there are many things that animals will eat that are harmful to them.

    As keepers of the chickens, it is our responsibility to protect them from possible harm. It just seems like a cruel joke to play on an unwitting, defenseless animal.
     
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  6. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Tom, chickens supposedly don't have heat receptors for things like capsaicin. So, it's not like they'd look for gallons of water to drink to kill the fire.
     
  7. Tiff

    Tiff New Member

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    How come you don’t worm your birds?
    : -0
     
  8. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Many years ago I read a published paper about horses and worming programs. They looked at what happens if horses weren't wormed every month. I don't remember how long this study was but in the end they determined that a horse with a strong immune system was capable of keeping internal parasite loads at a minimum without worming.

    I was curious, what would happen with chickens?
     
  9. Sarah1up

    Sarah1up Member

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    For goats, horses and other grazing animals, rotational grazing can be enough to ward off a lot of intestinal parasites. I would think that having two chicken runs you could rotate between would accomplish something similar. I should totally have two runs and try it out.
     
  10. Tiff

    Tiff New Member

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    Have you noticed that boosting your chicken’s immune system keeps parasites at bay?
     
  11. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    I didn't do anything special for them outside of clean water, fresh food, clean digs and fresh air.