General questions

Discussion in 'Egg Quality & Storage' started by Bauernhof, Oct 21, 2020.

  1. Bauernhof

    Bauernhof New Member

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    I’ve recently read an article on storing eggs. It said you can store unwashed eggs in water mixed with Lime ( calcium hydroxide)
    Has anyone heard of this and would it be safe?
     
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  2. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    I sure haven't. But it seems that quite a few have used the technique.

    The only thing I found about them at the end of storage was having a stale taste and the white coloring being darker.

    Another challenge would be storing them at the temps recommended, one I saw said 45 for the low point.
     
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  3. Poultry Judge

    Poultry Judge Moderator Staff Member

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    Storing in lime is old timey stuff. However, archaeologists have tasted Egyptian chicken eggs stored in oil that were 3000 years old, and still were good.
     
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  4. Overmountain1

    Overmountain1 Well-Known Member

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    Wow that is really really impressive and cool- wonder what type of oil, and how to keep the oil itself from turning rancid? See, haven’t you figured out I need the WHOLE story?!?
     
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  5. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    I'll bet mineral oil would work. It doesn't go bad.
     
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  6. Poultry Judge

    Poultry Judge Moderator Staff Member

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    Mineral oil would work. They used olive oil mostly. I will give you the short version, we studied a little bit of this in Taphonomy in med. school. Today, we still do lots of modern canning in oil, think hot peppers. There are two ways for things like food to rot, aerobically, wherein microscopic critters use oxygen and eat the food and anaerobically where a different set of microscopic critters eat the food, respirate, poop and spoil the food. Eggs preserved in oil in a clay jug filled to the top and sealed with a stopper and wax, already defeats most of the aerobic destruction. The only issue was some of the oil migrated/evaporated through the porous walls of the clay amphora. But 3000 years later, if the eggs are still covered, they are good. The oil got very very stale but didn't go rancid because there wasn't enough oxygen. If I recall correctly, I think there is a small amount of salt involved too, and that pretty much defeats the anaerobic critters because it's not a friendly environment for them to eat the eggs.
     
  7. Poultry Judge

    Poultry Judge Moderator Staff Member

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    There is also the tradition of 100 year old eggs in China which utilize black tea and brine I believe, as the ingredients to prevent spoilage of the eggs. Salt in the brine and tannins in the cured tea leaves.
     
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  8. Poultry Judge

    Poultry Judge Moderator Staff Member

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    There are lots of recipes on the interweb if you want to try making some eggs. I make gallon jars of traditional pickled eggs and this week I am canning hot peppers, (with Ghost Peppers), in oil. I am making small jars to give away at the Holidays. I can't eat them anymore.
     
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  9. Poultry Judge

    Poultry Judge Moderator Staff Member

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    Well...I do eat them and then very much wish I had not!
     
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  10. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    LOL But taste testing is important if they're going to be gifts.
     
  11. Poultry Judge

    Poultry Judge Moderator Staff Member

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    The 100 year old eggs are fun too, if you choose to make them pick one of the simpler recipes and watch the amount of salt. They get salty fast.
     
  12. Overmountain1

    Overmountain1 Well-Known Member

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    That’s awesome! I hadn’t considered the bit of salt with it, it surely would make a difference even anaerobically. I’m not as educated as you, to be sure, but I was fortunate to take enough- Microbio (2x lol) and A&P I & II, and Chem, so I do -mostly- understand, that’s just really very very cool.
    Yep, definitely becoming a future project of mine! I usually can my grandmas lime pickles and some sketty sauce in the fall but too busy this year. I have one jar of my sauce and one of pickles left. I’m saving them for a rainy day!! Best pickles in the world, I swear. Point is, the eggs will become a new thing to add to the menu! Yay! I will def let you know when I start in on it, I’m sure I’ll try at least a couple diff ways.
     
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  13. Poultry Judge

    Poultry Judge Moderator Staff Member

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    I also remembered on my father's farm they had a root cellar and they used to layer things with ash, charcoal, and sand. They also used to have an ice house and insulated the ice blocks with sawdust.
     
  14. Biring

    Biring Well-Known Member

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    Slightly off-topic, but you all reminded me of my archaeological conservation classes at uni. I was given a genuine ancient Egyptian mummified cat to work on, but after the first class I stored it incorrectly. By the second class it was mouldy and had fleas!
     
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  15. Biring

    Biring Well-Known Member

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    I did a bit of research and discovered that a ship filled with ancient Egyptian antiquities landed in the port of Liverpool in the late 1800s and the contents were auctioned locally, with the auctioneer using a mummified cat as a gavel. I wouldn’t be surprised if the cat I was given for this class was that gavel! It certainly looked like it could have been.
     
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  16. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    LOL That is so awful.
     
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  17. Poultry Judge

    Poultry Judge Moderator Staff Member

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    I read that at one of the cemeteries on the west bank of the Nile at Saqqara, there are seven million cats buried in several hectares.
     
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