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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
CB is correct. Pullet.
Thank you. It is odd. We've given her the same opportunities for affection as the others. And she will NOT have it. She's also inconsiderate of other chickens. That's an odd way of phrasing I know. But to say she is aggressive is not accurate.
 

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Thank you. It is odd. We've given her the same opportunities for affection as the others. And she will NOT have it. She's also inconsiderate of other chickens. That's an odd way of phrasing I know. But to say she is aggressive is not accurate.
Well, chickens each have their own personalities. What do you mean inconsiderate? She's probably just top of the pecking order.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well, chickens each have their own personalities. What do you mean inconsiderate? She's probably just top of the pecking order.
She will jump on them to get them out of her way if they are crowding the way. I've never seen her be violent. But she will cause them to squawk or squeal sometimes by her abrupt actions. She startles them with her pushiness. She will flap her wings and push them out of the way when I hand feed treats (twice a day). And I make sure everyone gets some; therefore, there should be no fear of being left out. She is very impatient. The others will wait eagerly for their treats until I kneel down. The Wyan flies up to my hand and pecks real hard before landing again. And when she eats out of my hand she's very aggressive. Fast and furious. Harsh even. If I had a small child I would not allow them to feed her. She pulls skin in the process of trying to get food.
 

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With laced Wyandottes, the males feather in with a distinctly different pattern from the females, so beyond a doubt this is a girl just from that. Males of this age should have a solid patch of color in the hackles, almost like a ring around the back of their neck, that's the color of the outside of the lacing (in this case black), and solid patches of color in the shoulder area and across the back, the color of the inside of the lacing (in this case 'silver' or white). Your bird is evenly laced overall, and is therefore a female. Here is an example picture of a cockerel around the same age to show what I mean about the feather coloration (not my bird, I just grabbed it off google) :

Bird Phasianidae Comb Chicken Beak


Personality doesn't really mean much for most large fowl breeds at this age, at least in my experience. You just have a very food-motivated Wyandotte pullet on your hands. Chickens aren't programed to think, "They give an equal amount to everyone, so I should wait my turn." They are programed to think, "I am hungry so I need to get to that food and eat before the others take it all." This is probably also why she pecks so aggressively, because she's rushing to eat it all before the others. Chicken behavior can look pretty harsh from a human standpoint, but it's just how chickens are. You'll likely find that they all calm down after their 'teenage hormone' rush over the next month or two, though she may remain a greedy girl even after that. Some chickens are just like that.

My Wyandottes were never overly affectionate, either, and all three were hens. The last one will be 12 years old in the spring, and despite having never been given a reason to, she still hates people. :ROFLMAO: Some people do have friendly Wyandottes, but that wasn't my experience at all, so it likely depends on where you get them, and individual personalities.
 

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Looking like a 100% pullet! She is beautiful, love her coloring!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
With laced Wyandottes, the males feather in with a distinctly different pattern from the females, so beyond a doubt this is a girl just from that. Males of this age should have a solid patch of color in the hackles, almost like a ring around the back of their neck, that's the color of the outside of the lacing (in this case black), and solid patches of color in the shoulder area and across the back, the color of the inside of the lacing (in this case 'silver' or white). Your bird is evenly laced overall, and is therefore a female. Here is an example picture of a cockerel around the same age to show what I mean about the feather coloration (not my bird, I just grabbed it off google) :

View attachment 43015

Personality doesn't really mean much for most large fowl breeds at this age, at least in my experience. You just have a very food-motivated Wyandotte pullet on your hands. Chickens aren't programed to think, "They give an equal amount to everyone, so I should wait my turn." They are programed to think, "I am hungry so I need to get to that food and eat before the others take it all." This is probably also why she pecks so aggressively, because she's rushing to eat it all before the others. Chicken behavior can look pretty harsh from a human standpoint, but it's just how chickens are. You'll likely find that they all calm down after their 'teenage hormone' rush over the next month or two, though she may remain a greedy girl even after that. Some chickens are just like that.

My Wyandottes were never overly affectionate, either, and all three were hens. The last one will be 12 years old in the spring, and despite having never been given a reason to, she still hates people. :ROFLMAO: Some people do have friendly Wyandottes, but that wasn't my experience at all, so it likely depends on where you get them, and individual personalities.
Wow! I learned so much. Thank you! I sincerely appreciate your time and knowledge. You rock!
 

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She will jump on them to get them out of her way if they are crowding the way. I've never seen her be violent. But she will cause them to squawk or squeal sometimes by her abrupt actions. She startles them with her pushiness. She will flap her wings and push them out of the way when I hand feed treats (twice a day). And I make sure everyone gets some; therefore, there should be no fear of being left out. She is very impatient. The others will wait eagerly for their treats until I kneel down. The Wyan flies up to my hand and pecks real hard before landing again. And when she eats out of my hand she's very aggressive. Fast and furious. Harsh even. If I had a small child I would not allow them to feed her. She pulls skin in the process of trying to get food.
Ah, yeah chickens will be chickens. They don't think about equal amounts, and waiting turns. I wouldn't look at her as being inconsiderate, just very food motivated.
 
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