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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Congrats on the new babies, Dan. Will she let you get some pics of her little ones?
As soon as they're more active I will post a picture. I put the mom and the poults on the floor this morning. Surprisingly, the turkey hen did not make any fuss so taking pictures will be easy.
 

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Maybe being a mother mellowed her out a bit. Or she's more tame than you realized.

I just thought of something, are turkeys as ferociously protective of their babies as Guinea hens are? Do they get really agitated when you move her babies?
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Maybe being a mother mellowed her out a bit. Or she's more tame than you realized.

I just thought of something, are turkeys as ferociously protective of their babies as Guinea hens are? Do they get really agitated when you move her babies?
Apparently she IS more trusting than I thought. Yes and not so much. My turkeys are very protective when it involves something other than me; I am tolerated so I can move them as needed without the mother getting very upset.
 

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That's actually pretty nice. If I have to move a Guinea hen and her keets it can be quite stressful for me because I know if I get too close she's going to come after me just like a flogging rooster will.
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
That's actually pretty nice. If I have to move a Guinea hen and her keets it can be quite stressful for me because I know if I get too close she's going to come after me just like a flogging rooster will.
YIKES! At worst I get a peck that gradually gets harder until I stop bothering the hen.
 

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It's hard when I realize that folks raise gamebirds, ie turkeys, and have them be so calm when messing with their young.

It's usually about a month before I can go in with a Guinea hen and her keets and not keep a close watch on her. And if Dad is with her, it gets a bit more complicated.
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
It's hard when I realize that folks raise gamebirds, ie turkeys, and have them be so calm when messing with their young.

It's usually about a month before I can go in with a Guinea hen and her keets and not keep a close watch on her. And if Dad is with her, it gets a bit more complicated.
I don't remember much of the guineas I had of the past. I do remember the ones I had were rotten parents. I used bantams to hatch guinea eggs.
 

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I don't remember much of the guineas I had of the past. I do remember the ones I had were rotten parents. I used bantams to hatch guinea eggs.
Actually, they're very good parents. This is where their wild genetics complicate things. In the wild they have to get their babies moving fast. The problem is the morning dew on the grass can cause them to get cold. Mom is just doing what instinct tells her to do. That's where we have to adjust things so keets will survive.

My last group was hatched outside of the coop. I heard her calling and knew what was happening. Sure enough she had a bunch of keets hatched. I spent about 15 months very carefully herding her and her new hatchlings to the coop. Once in that's where they stayed for about a month.
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
She's still really serious about keeping her babies covered.

It might be the pic but if you hadn't said they were turkeys I'd think they were chicks.
For the first week or so my turkeys are just living brooders for their poults. Most of the day she will be brooding like in the picture. The picture, like usual, sucks. If you saw a poult and chick side by side you'd have no problem telling the difference.

Not all birds/guineas are created equal; mine were hopeless in every parental way. Yes, some of it had to due with dew, but WI shorter season played a big part as often the guineas didn't start brooding until August. The ones I had were not vey protective; it just did not work to rely on the guineas to raise their chicks.
 

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Huh. As long as I could get Mom and keets into a protective environment they would survive. But you're right, that late into the season causes problems. They're not like chicks, they won't go to a warming station like chicks do.

Having that waterer and feeder so close is a good idea if she's going to hold that posture for another week. That's dedication at protecting her young.
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
She will lead them around and not stay in that spot, but they do brood their babies a lot. After a week or two the poults are very hardy and then they're off and running. Poults get into all kinds of problems and end up dead because they stray from mom. At about a month of age they wise up a bit and are less likely to fall in a puddle and drown, are less likely to get their head caught somewhere and choke, are less of a target to small predators, can fly, know enough to come in out of the rain. Poults seem to look for ways to commit suicide.

I keep the moms and poults locked in an area that is baby safe for at least a month. While I enjoy having poults, I breathe a sigh of relief when they're sold as they are the stupidest baby there is.
 

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I'm sick. I laughed at the suicide comment.

Quail might be up there with them. There was one place, just one, in a 10 ft by 10 ft pen to get their head stuck. I'll be flipped, I go back out there the next day and either the same one or one other of the little darlings has its head stuck.

I fixed that spot right after getting the dummy out.
 

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She will lead them around and not stay in that spot, but they do brood their babies a lot. After a week or two the poults are very hardy and then they're off and running. Poults get into all kinds of problems and end up dead because they stray from mom. At about a month of age they wise up a bit and are less likely to fall in a puddle and drown, are less likely to get their head caught somewhere and choke, are less of a target to small predators, can fly, know enough to come in out of the rain. Poults seem to look for ways to commit suicide.

I keep the moms and poults locked in an area that is baby safe for at least a month. While I enjoy having poults, I breathe a sigh of relief when they're sold as they are the stupidest baby there is.
Well said!
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I'm sick. I laughed at the suicide comment.

Quail might be up there with them. There was one place, just one, in a 10 ft by 10 ft pen to get their head stuck. I'll be flipped, I go back out there the next day and either the same one or one other of the little darlings has its head stuck.

I fixed that spot right after getting the dummy out.
Newly hatched poults and quail are about equal in intelligence, but poults can and do learn; if they survive long enough.
 

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Newly hatched poults and quail are about equal in intelligence, but poults can and do learn; if they survive long enough.
Exactly Dan! My theory is that it is an evolutionary intelligence that simply doesn't match up with humans imposing physical structure on the environment. Guineas too!
 

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On a slightly different note, I had to slow down for two gobblers in the road on my way home this morning. Spring is officially started.
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
We see wild birds starting nests. Yes, spring is here. 11 cochins are going today too. Hopefully, hens will go broody soon. Right now I've just one serama hen brooding and nothing else; pretty odd for this place!
 
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