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Discussion Starter #1
There's one baby that is failing to grow. It doesn't even have all its big bird feathers yet. The white one behind in the pic is also one that is smaller but is doing better in the growth department.

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Do you know the genetic lines on your Guineas? Not that it matters too much, thirty years ago, I used to enjoy it, I had two years of genetics in college and liked sorting out the traits. Hope your little ones thrive and continue to grow! They are cute!
 

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No clue other than a young man in the area that raised the lavenders. I guess I've never cared that much about bloodlines with my Guineas because they were purely for being bug munchers and for my entertainment.

The one thing I noticed about peep and I hope it's a good sign, I don't see the open beak breathing anymore.
 

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I'm thinking more heart issues. It would explain the slow development and the open beak breathing with exertion. It can also be a genetic issue that will never be explained.
 

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Thank you. I'm pulling for this little one to thrive. Although it eats and drinks and loves treats just like the others even without its full feather development and diminutive size, it's still a question on if it will live.
 

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Have you ever heard that Guineas may have been the very first animal domesticated by humans as a watch animal? And that while other birds have continually evolved to fit their environments, Guineas have remained essentially unchanged for millions of years.
 

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No, I hadn't heard that about them being used as the very first watch animals. I can tell you they're quite good at it.

In many ways they train the human as much as the human trains them when it comes to understanding each other.

It's true. They are very much the bird that came out of Africa. They want to roost as high as they can get, which are the trees. Hens are the hardest to convince to build nests in a coop or enclosed pen. Once they hatch keets they want them out right now which goes back to their ancient genetics of survival.

With my original flock it got to where my guineas and dogs worked together. There was a certain bark the dogs had that got the Guineas running to them to investigate the problem and there was a body language the dogs recognized in the Guineas that had them joining the Guineas to run off interlopers. It was fascinating to watch them work together.

I guess you can see why I'm so devoted to the Guinea fowl.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So, this morning I caught the littlest keet. The rest are out free ranging, I noticed baby was struggling to keep up. I had to hunt it down this morning after the flock moved from the front yard to the side yard. It finally made its presence known. I herded the keets into the coop to catch the little one.

At first it was very unhappy with being separated. I looked a little bit ago and found it exploring the Hamburg/Quail pen for stuff to eat.

Looks like I'm going to have to build another ramp so it can roost with the Hamburg.
 

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That is interesting about how your Guineas and dogs worked together. I believe I read somewhere about Guinea conformation that they have remained physically unchanged for over four million years because they are well adapted to their environmental niche. There is speculation that they worked in conjunction with early dogs as watch animals as recently as ten to twelve thousand years ago. Apparently saber toothed tigers were a serious predator for humans for a while during the last few ice ages as they were at the top of the food chain. So, Guineas apparently had a very functional and important role in human survival.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It was really pretty fascinating to watch them work together. In the beginning I had to work hard to get the Alpha dog to understand the birds were part of our pack and to leave them be.

Fast forward a couple of years and they became a thing to reckon with when they were together.

Obviously, you can tell I'm quite enamored with the species. The understanding didn't happen overnight, we had to work together to understand our rolls in each other's lives.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I need to amend some of the glowing things I've said about my birds. I've forgotten what it can be like when there is discord in the flock when it comes lock down.

Daddy is done raising keets. He wants his mate all to himself so he's constantly running the keets off. That goes for going up at night too. I had to corral him behind a fence to let babies in. Got them in then it was goat roping time getting the adults in and the babies not coming back out.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So, anyway, baby is back with its sibs. Momma knew one of her babies was in the adjoining chicken/quail pen and she kept pacing wanting her baby. And there was baby keeping pace with her. That isn't the rest I envisioned for baby so I put it in with its group for the night.

I did get to see it navigate its ramp for the first time.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
No one is more surprised than me that the tiny baby is still with us. It hasn't grown a lick. Still eats and drinks like any normal baby but tires quickly. It still doesn't have all of it's big bird feathers.

Did I mention it's smaller than my pharoah quail? Anyone knows quail knows how small that is.
 

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I would kill for a handful of button quail but I would welcome pharaoh as easily. I need to move out of the city limits dang it.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Quail are very quiet, quieter than chickens. So, I guess my question is why can't you have them where you live?

I saw baby flap its wings this morning like the rest of its sibs. Cutest thing ever. Still can't fly but it knows it has wings.
 

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I'm not entirely sure why they are on the list, I think they are referring to the Bobwhites maybe? If my husband would let me, again, I'd take a handful of buttons any day and I would keep them inside somewhere so they wouldn't be discovered (or eaten by the hawks as chicken nuggets) or even the pharaohs for that matter.

I noticed the hatcheries will not ship quail chicks, they are too fragile I guess. Since I don't have an incubator, I can't buy the eggs that they do sell lol. I suppose that I could make an incubator...my husband is a handyman...*ideas begin forming* hmmm....
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Bobwhites are mean as snakes according to some who raise them. Most of the time the Pharaohs get along well. According to the guy I got mine from two males with ten females can live harmoniously. Except that's not 100% since I have one of my males penned off.
 

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around here you won't find bobwhites in captivity, they are wild only, it is highly against the law to have bobwhites period, no matter where you live (in town or out).

I know buttons are the smallest of the quails so how much larger are pharaohs compared to buttons?
 
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