Egg Yolks Very Pale - Why?

Discussion in 'Egg Quality & Storage' started by Binkston, Jul 16, 2015.

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  1. Binkston

    Binkston Rhode Island Red Wrangler

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    Lately, my hens have been laying eggs with yolks that are very pale yellow. Like grocery store eggs or maybe a hair paler than that!

    Any idea why they are doing this? Should I be concerned?

    Thanks for your help.
     
  2. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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  3. Nm156

    Nm156 Well-Known Member

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    What are you feeding them?
     
  4. Binkston

    Binkston Rhode Island Red Wrangler

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    Feeding Countryside Organic Layer

    Feeding Countryside Organic Layer
     
  5. Nm156

    Nm156 Well-Known Member

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    MY guess too much field peas as #1 ingredient,no Tagetes .Their not getting enough carotenoids.
     
  6. Binkston

    Binkston Rhode Island Red Wrangler

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    Haven't changed feed in years, yolks used to be orange

    The yolks got pale only in the last few weeks or so. Before that they were orange-yellow. Same feed.
     
  7. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    The heat could have them cutting back on how much they're eating.
     
  8. jn4

    jn4 New Member

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    Pale yolks are a sign of dietary deficiency and related stress. If possible cut back on the commercial feeds and allow the birds more natural food....(bugs and such) if that is practical for you.
    If you keep a garden,..when the harvest is done let the birds have at it...they will clean up the bugs and grubs and leave you with good organic fertilizers.
     
  9. TheKeeper777

    TheKeeper777 Member

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    My eggs were pale but they tasted fine!
     
  10. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    In addition to what Jn4 stated, capillary worms can be also be a cause of pale yolks.
     
  11. seminole wind

    seminole wind Previously seminolewind

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    Wow. Learned something new!
     
  12. MikeA_15

    MikeA_15 New Member

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    Yolk color changes with the seasons due to carotenoids which cause pigmentation and is found in plants. If this is not supplied in feed, or chickens don't range where grasses are available, yolks will be lighter, not darker. It does not effect the nutritive quality of the egg.
     
  13. seminole wind

    seminole wind Previously seminolewind

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    I've always thought that corn makes the yolk yellow.
     
  14. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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  15. MikeA_15

    MikeA_15 New Member

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    It does contain carotenoids. That is partially why yellow corn is preferred instead of white corn in chicken diets, why marigold is in some feed formulations, etc. I always have deep yellow yolks through spring and early summer.
     
  16. MikeA_15

    MikeA_15 New Member

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    X2. I think a deworming is always good this time of year when there's lots of moisture and things are warming up.
     
  17. seminole wind

    seminole wind Previously seminolewind

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  18. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    Right. I cant emphasize enough...spring time is worm time. I'm worming mine today with wazine, followed by pyrantel pamoate the next 2 days, then hitting them with safeguard x 3 days this time next month.
     
  19. chickenqueen

    chickenqueen Well-Known Member

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    Ok Dawg,just purchased a bottle of Valbazen.Can't see the poultry dosage,only see cattle,sheep and goat dosage, poultry not listed.How much do I give.Also,why are you using other wormers?I didn't know chickens got worms until a couple of years ago and now feel guilty I haven't been doing this all along.I don't want my babies to have worms.
     
  20. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    There are quite a few wormers that can be used in chickens. I've used Valbazen for years. It is simply the best wormer on the market and kills every known type of worm that chickens can get including flukes. I also use different wormers on occasion to prevent worm resistance to one particular wormer.
    Use a syringe without a needle to administer the Valbazen orally undiluted to each chicken. Dosage is 1/2cc orally for standard size birds. Repeat dosing again 10 days later to kill worms hatched from eggs missed by the initial dosing. If you ever see tapeworm segments in feces, let me know. Tapeworms are difficult to get rid of and requires special treatment with Valbazen.