Dying Astrolorps with bloody vents

Discussion in 'Emergencies, Illness, Meds & Cures' started by alisonkitchen, Jan 12, 2013.

  1. alisonkitchen

    alisonkitchen New Member

    2
    0
    0
    I am on my third Astrolorp who is dying with a bloody vent. Appears to have laid an egg this morning which had blood spots on it. The other two also had bloody vents and just grew lethargic and died. It has been extremely cold here (-30 at night) for the last two to three weeks but I have them in a house with a heat lamp and they seem to tolerate it okay. My other breeds seem to be fine. She is my last one and I am hopeful that it is breed related but I am wondering if anyone has any insight into what the problem is? Thanks.
     
  2. 7chicks

    7chicks New Member

    3,192
    3
    0
    How awful. Wish I had a clue as to what is going on but I don't. Hopefully someone soon who does know what is the problem will bump on here. In the meantime, hugs. =(
     

  3. 7chicks

    7chicks New Member

    3,192
    3
    0
    Is her vent protruding? Prolapsed vent?
     
  4. 7chicks

    7chicks New Member

    3,192
    3
    0
    Okay, typed in chicken bloody vent dying into web search. This is what I found so I copied and am pasting the info directly here. Maybe this will give you some answers.

    It does happen occasionally. It's called "prolapsed vent", "prolapse" or "blowout". It happens when a hen lays an egg a bit bigger than normal and her vent (cloaca) turns partially inside out. Separate her from the others. They will be tempted to peck at the prolapse and kill her. Clean it as best you can with water and a clean paper towel. Then gently push back in anything that has come out and apply a bit of Preparation H to the inflamed area. It's kinda like a hemorrhoid.

    You might also give her soluble antibiotics in her drinking water for about 4-5 days to guard against infection.

    The following is from "The Chicken Health Handbook" by Gail Damerow ISBN: 0-88266-611-8. This book is highly recommended and available at a 30% discount from our Poultry Bookstore.

    "Prolapsed Oviduct, also called "blowout" or "pickout" is a condition in which the lower part of the hen's oviduct turns inside out and protrudes through the vent. Prolapse occurs most often when a hen starts laying at too young an age, is too fat, or lays unusually large eggs. Caught in time, the prolapse can sometimes be reversed by applying a hemorrhoidal cream (such as Preparation H) and isolating the hen until she approves. Otherwise, the other chickens will pick at her vent, eventually pulling out her oviduct and intestines and causing the hen to die from hemorrhage and shock. Not all vent picking is due to prolapse, but instead may result from faulty management - feeders, waterers and roosts may be positioned in such a way that birds below can pick on the vents of birds above."