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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so I do not have any chickens yet, I am currently spending time reading up all the info I can and I joined this forum. Anyways I saw a post that someone did with a large egg and people were talking about double yolks. I feel stupid for asking, but are double yolks safe to eat?
 

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Yes, double yolks are just fine to eat. It just means two yolks were released during the egg production.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am actually getting ready to move out in the sticks (if you wanna call it that) about 5 miles out of town, and the place already has a chicken coop and a barn and the owner is quiet thrilled that I want chickens.
 

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I am actually getting ready to move out in the sticks (if you wanna call it that) about 5 miles out of town, and the place already has a chicken coop and a barn and the owner is quiet thrilled that I want chickens.
Make sure you scrub the coop before adding a flock. I would also be leary of the soil. Not sure if there is a precaution you could take on that one. I would ask the other owners if they ever had health issues in their flock.
 

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I would take another tactic with the old coop and soils..I'd be very pleased to expose my chickens to whatever is existing there. Anything that still lingers in a long empty coop and in the soils is pretty much there to stay, so if your flock is to be exposed to it, expose them.

They can't avoid any and all germs in their environment, so the best defense is a good offense...flock management geared towards strong immune systems instead of trying to place them in a bubble of hygiene. It won't ever happen that you can avoid any and all germs specific to chickens, so building a good immune system is the most effective way to help them adapt to their new environment. Exposure to air and time has likely killed most germs except coccidia in the soils, which is in all farm soils to some degree. I've moved to and lived on several farms and old coops and never had an issue with my flocks. Never had any illness in my flocks for 37 yrs, so it must be working.
 
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