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The only way to know for certain is to have your vet do a fecal float. They don't have to have the bird. Just collect some from several places as clean as possible. Put in a container and carry it in.
 

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Oh okay thats smart to do, should i wait a few says to do so?
I can save you money. Just follow the instructions in post #6 in this thread and you wont have to worry about worm eggs or worms for awhile. THEN, as Robin stated, gather fresh fecal samples from a few of your birds and place them in a ziplock bag. Then take them to a vet to be examined under a microscope by a vet or an assistant. It shouldnt cost too much.
It would be best to do this 5-6 weeks after the last dosing with Valbazen. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
I did find a vet with vca by me that sees chickens and will test the poop. They would want to do a check up though on chicken before taking any stool sample. Urgent care appointment is quickest since the vet is booked up until the 28th. Its just 185.40 take her in tomorrow for urgent care app to see her quickest. Imma just do that i feel better having her checked i think as soon as i can
 

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You don't have to explain your reasons. They're your choices to make, not ours or anyone else's. I used to take mine to the vet when they had me scratching my head on what the issue was.

Have that pic on your phone? Show that to the vet. I swear I've never seen an overload that large before.
 

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What a bummer! I was really hoping to go the non-chemical route. Is it possible to remove harmful parasitic worms in your soil (dung beetles, DE, or something?) before you get chickens and throughout their lifetimes?????
 

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Chickens that are penned are more susceptible getting worms because they are on the same soil all the time. However, keeping everything as dry as possible deters worm infections.
My birds are penned and I have sand in the pens and inside the coops. Sand doesnt wash away like dirt or mud, sand soaks up water so there arnt any nasty mudpuddles that birds love to drink from. Sand dries quicker than dirt or mud, and it's easier to scoop poop. Think beach.

Nematodes are everywhere in the soil, you cant eliminate them. How often you worm a bird depends on your environment, especially soil conditions. If you live in an area where the soil is warm, moist or wet most of the time, you will have to worm birds frequently. If your soil is desert like, rocky/mountainous, or cool/cold and dry most of the time, you might only have to worm your birds a couple times a year, just depends.

If you let your birds free range, rotate areas where they forage, much like cattle and goats. If they are kept in the same area, the worm burden becomes a higher risk as time passes with greater chances of infection. Once birds are rotated to another area, the sun's UV rays will kill worm eggs on the surface, but not in the soil.

All animals get worms, birds are no exception.
Worms slowly starve chickens. They weaken the immune system, opening the door for all kinds of diseases.
 

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Absolutely everything Dawg said.
 
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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
today is first day henry is acting like her normal self. Fingers crossed it stays n continues!! Vet gave her a dewormer and i purchased more to do the other hen at home. Had to cut some of butt feathers off from icky poop. No vent gleet tho.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
You mentioned in a post to rotate the birds to other areas to forage, i deffinatly didnt consider that. My backyard i feel is rather small. Would they be okay if i divided my back yard up to rotate them?
 

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If you put them on a worming program you really don't have to worry about rotation.

I highly doubt you'll ever see an infestation like Henry had ever again. Rescues can come with some incredible nasties but once they're in an environment ideal for them the nasties happen much less often.
 

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today is first day henry is acting like her normal self. Fingers crossed it stays n continues!! Vet gave her a dewormer and i purchased more to do the other hen at home. Had to cut some of butt feathers off from icky poop. No vent gleet tho.
What is the name of the wormer that the vet gave you? Panacur (fenbendazole) or Pyrantel Pamoate?
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Im glad i took her in because the worm stuff i got from store, were homeopathic drops didnt quite pay attention what guy was giving me. So they got an actual dose of real dewormer. I will deffinatly mark calender and begin doing a routine. Truly appreciate all the advice and information from everyone.
 

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Most of the time it's best not to trust the people where you buy your feed to know the right things to get. If you don't know, research first. Ask here. Chances are there is someone here that can help you.

dawg did tell which wormers to get so that's your bad for listening to the person at the feed store. Most don't know the first thing about chicken healthcare.

Just because the wormer is in the horse, goat, cattle aisle does not mean it can't be used on chickens. It's off label use but our birds are not for the table so it doesn't matter that we use it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
True he did tell me what stuff. i kept seeing ghoats n cattle when researching and then grabbed what other guy offered at feed store. Once seeing no change i just chose to go to the vet. Alot of ignorant errors on my part. I feel i learned my lesson so their wont ever be a next time. Should of just listened to dawg first time. He truly knows valuable information and advice bless u for being awsome person. Again i truly thank you all the advice and help.
 

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Every single one of us started somewhere. There's a learning curve for the backyard flocks when we want them to be with us as long as possible. Even today, after years and years, I'm still learning.

I had to learn somewhere that a feed store clerk had no clue what they were talking about. Luckily I was already informed enough to know they had no clue when I needed something.

There actually are things we use off label. They've finally decided to see if what we use ends up in the eggs. The last study I saw involved Ivermectin. They found minute amounts in the eggs so more than likely the others also end up in them. But like dawg said, we're still around after eating the eggs.
 

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I stopped using Ivermectin years ago. It's primary purpose is a wormer. However, chicken owners were mostly using it to treat external parasites rather than internal parasites. Because of that, Ivermectin has lost its effectiveness treating worms in chickens. Now it's losing its effectiveness in treating external parasites in some parts of the country all due to parasite resistance.
For lice/mites, Permethrin dust or liquid concentrate are the way to go treating external parasites and there isnt a withdrawal period unlike Ivermectin.
 
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