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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We get FAR more eggs from 6 hens than we can use, of give to our kids. But, in winter they taper off and after a couple years the laying slows down. Then, we replace the hens, but have a period with no eggs at all. :( So, we are learning to dehydrate our excess eggs, for long term storage.

We bought this dehydrator:
http://www.houzz.com/photos/971190/...ydrator-contemporary-small-kitchen-appliances-

Our process has developed as follows.
-Crack 7 or 8 eggs into the blender, and whip for a full minute.
-Using the fruit leather trays (15" diameter in this unit), carefully pour and spread the whipped eggs until the tray is full, half in each of 2 trays = almost running over. (Get the thing LEVEL to start with!) A batch of 7-8 will fill 2 trays.
-Repeat 4 times to fill all 8 trays, and turn the thing on, set at 135*F.
-18 to 24 hours later, they are pretty dry. The eggs crack off the plastic trays easily into a baking pan.
-We grind/chop the egg flakes into powder using a small food chopper like this one: http://www.overstock.com/Home-Garde...13:s&track=pspla&cid=202290&kid=9553000357392

-To be SURE they are dry as possible, we put the powder back into the dehydrator for another 4 hours or so, again, scattered evenly in all 8 trays.
-We seal the resulting powder, measured to = 10 or 12 eggs into Foodsaver bags. We use a paper towel folded over the egg powder to keep dust from being sucked out and ruining the heat seal.

I'll have to ask my wife about measuring for reconstituting, but the 10 eggs make a package about as thick as my thumb by 2" wide x 9" long. Big space saver!

I'll get back later today about using the egg powder. It keeps for MONTHS in the freezer, and we don't yet know how long outside the freezer. Removing the air keeps the cholesterol (fat) from going rancid, I am told.

Editted to add:
1/4 cup of the dried egg powder + 1/3 cup of water = 2 eggs.
We add the water and stir, then let it sit for a few minutes, up to an hour, and then stir again. Wife makes scrambled eggs and omelets with this, and also uses the powder for baking needs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They taste just like fresh eggs. The first omelet came out a bit tough, but we think we can fix that by whipping it more, and maybe add a little milk. :) Can't tell any difference in bread or other baked goods.

I read somewhere that powdered eggs were used in Army rations in WWII. The soldiers didn't like them much, IIRC, but we are getting along fine with them.
 

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Yep, it works great for saving an over abundance of eggs. Just so far this year I have dried about 15 dozen and vacuum sealed them in 3- quart Mason jars. I too, double dry them.
 

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machinist said:
They taste just like fresh eggs. The first omelet came out a bit tough, but we think we can fix that by whipping it more, and maybe add a little milk. :) Can't tell any difference in bread or other baked goods.

I read somewhere that powdered eggs were used in Army rations in WWII. The soldiers didn't like them much, IIRC, but we are getting along fine with them.
Back when i first became a baker in the early 70s we used dehydrated eggs for a short time in the cookie formulas...we called them "rooster eggs" . The cookies Sucked!
So back to fresh eggs we went.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would not say that everyone will like dehydrated eggs, and there are many who do not. We are getting along with them, though.
 

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they are great for a backcountry breakfast. I made a batch using my oven on low. they are not the greatest, but they are still tasty. especially at 14000 feet
 
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