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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all i bought and fell in love with the LF Dark Brahmas and found 2 other breeders and many looking . Im wanting genetic diversity so currious if anyone here has them
 

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Hey all i bought and fell in love with the LF Dark Brahmas and found 2 other breeders and many looking . Im wanting genetic diversity so currious if anyone here has them
TammyN, I know a few folks here in SW Ohio that raise bantam Dark Brahmas but they run in some of the same circles with the LF folks, too. Where are you located??? I'll ask around and see if I can find anything for you in my area. Are you looking for chicks, hatching eggs or adult fowl???
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Jeff i am in Oregon and have only found 2 LF breeders 1 in california and 1 in NY
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just joined it I am also Hyped Im getting some eggs from Over Seas for some new blood.
 

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I just joined it I am also Hyped Im getting some eggs from Over Seas for some new blood.
How does getting hatching eggs from overseas work exactly???

Federal law requires all incoming eggs or chicks to be quarantined for 30 days....obviously eggs would not be viable for hatching at that time. People import chicks and adult fowl all the time but it is expensive because you have to pay the cost of the quarantine (somebody to feed, water and care for the birds for the 30 day period).

Just be careful of scammers who want to take your money and not deliver the "goods"!!!;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
How does getting hatching eggs from overseas work exactly???

Federal law requires all incoming eggs or chicks to be quarantined for 30 days....obviously eggs would not be viable for hatching at that time. People import chicks and adult fowl all the time but it is expensive because you have to pay the cost of the quarantine (somebody to feed, water and care for the birds for the 30 day period).

Just be careful of scammers who want to take your money and not deliver the "goods"!!!;)
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Poultry Hatching Eggs

Procedures for Importing Poultry Hatching Eggs into the United States

ADVISORY: Until further notice, live avian commodities (including eggs for hatching) from the following countries or regions have been prohibited entry to the United States due to the presence of highly pathogenic avian influenza: Afghanistan, Albania, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cambodia, Djibouti, Egypt, Ghana, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Ivory Coast (Côte d'Ivoire), Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Laos, Macau, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestinian Autonomous Territories, People's Republic of China, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sudan, Taipei Chinese/Taiwan, Thailand, Togo, Turkey, Ukraine, and Vietnam..

The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines poultry as chickens, doves, ducks, geese, grouse, guinea fowl, partridges, pea fowl, pheasants, pigeons, quail, swans, and turkeys (including hatching eggs of these species).

General Requirements

All hatching eggs of poultry imported into the United States must be accompanied by a USDA import permit VS Form 17-129 (except through a land border port from Canada).
Current veterinary health certificate issued by a full-time salaried veterinarian of the agency responsible for animal health of the national government in the exporting country of origin.
Importers should submit the application and the processing fee for a permit by check, money order, charge card or by providing a USDA user fee account. If changes need to be made for a permit after it has been issued, there is an additional fee. Current fees can be found here.
Fees apply if arrival is during regular working hours (approximately 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM, Monday through Friday), and prior notification has been given. Overtime charges apply if the bird arrives before or after these hours. In addition, USDA port veterinarians are not stationed full-time at each port of entry, prior notification is critical to the import process.
Flock of origin veterinary health certification statements

The health certificate must be in English or a complete English translation must be provided. The veterinary health certificate must accompany the hatching eggs while in transit and must state that:

the flock or flocks of origin were found upon inspection to be free from evidence of communicable diseases of poultry;
no exotic Newcastle disease has occurred on the premises of origin or on adjoining premises during the 90 days immediately preceding the date of movement of the eggs from such region; and
as far as it has been possible to determine, such flock or flocks were not exposed to such disease during the preceding 90 days.
The flock of origin of hatching eggs imported from all countries except Canada are required to test serologically negative for egg drop syndrome (adenovirus 127), test negative on environmental culture for Salmonella enteritidis, and test serologically negative for viral turkey rhinotracheitis (avian pneumovirus) by a government approved laboratory. The flock of origin of hatching eggs from chicken-like poultry imported from Canada must be under a surveillance program similar to that of the USDA's National Poultry Improvement Plan.

The health certificates that accompany hatching egg shipments must indicate that:

Flocks of origin for the hatching eggs were not vaccinated against any H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza.
The shipment will not transit through any regions where APHIS considers highly pathogenic avian influenza to exist, as listed here on this web page.
The flocks of origin have been vaccinated against Newcastle disease (avian paramyxovirus) at least 21 days prior to export, using vaccines that do not contain any velogenic strains of Newcastle disease virus. OR:
The flocks of origin have not been vaccinated against Newcastle disease.
Some hatching eggs are required to be quarantined for a minimum of 30 days upon entry into the United States.
FDA Imported food requirement
Requirements for importing poultry hatching eggs differ for eggs being imported from countries designated and free of exotic Newcastle disease (END) than those not designated as free of END.

Poultry hatching eggs imported from countries designated as free of END

The following countries are considered by the USDA to be free of exotic Newcastle disease: Australia, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Denmark, Fiji, Finland, France, Greece, Great Britain (England, Scotland, Wales, and the Isle of Man), Iceland, Republic of Ireland, Luxembourg, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland.
Hatching eggs imported from these countries are not required to be quarantined. However, the hatching eggs must be accompanied by a veterinary health certificate issued by a national government veterinarian of the exporting country as well as by a USDA import permit (see exception for Canada below).
Poultry hatching eggs imported from countries not designated as free of END

In addition to the required veterinary health certificate and USDA import permit, importation of hatching eggs from countries not designated by the USDA to be free of END are restricted as follows:

Eggs must be transported from the port of entry to the hatchery in a vehicle sealed by the USDA.
Eggs must be hatched and brooded under the supervision of the Area Veterinarian in Charge (AVIC) in the State of destination. The hatchery must meet certain biosecurity standards and be inspected and approved by the AVIC prior to issuance of the import permit.
The poultry from such eggs must remain in quarantine for not less than 30 days following hatch.
During quarantine, the hatching eggs and poultry from such eggs are subject to any inspections, disinfections, and diagnostic testing as may be required by the USDA to determine their freedom from communicable diseases of poultry.
Poultry hatching eggs imported from Canada

Poultry hatching eggs imported from Canada must be accompanied by a veterinary health certificate issued by a Canadian government veterinarian. However, no quarantine is required for hatching eggs of Canadian origin. Those hatching eggs imported through a U.S.-Canadian land border port do not require a USDA import permit, whereas eggs entering the United States from Canada via air do require a USDA import permit.

The import permit application (VS Form 17-129) can be downloaded from the Internet at: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/library/forms/index.shtml#vs or by contacting us at:
USDA, APHIS, VS
National Center for Import and Export
4700 River Road, Unit 39
Riverdale, MD 20737
(301) 851-3300 Telephone
(301) 734-6402 Fax

Fish and Wildlife Service Permit Information
In the United States, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regulates the importation of avian species (including their hatching eggs) protected by various national and international acts and treaties such as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), the Wild Bird Conservation Act of 1992, the Migratory Bird Act, and the Endangered Species Act. To determine if the hatching eggs you wish to import are regulated by the USFWS, you can visit their web site at: http://permits.fws.gov/ or contact them at USFWS, Office of Management Authority, 4401 North Fairfax Drive, Room 420, Arlington, VA 22203, (800) 358-2104 (within the United States), or (703) 358-2104.

Please visit the FWS web site at: http://permits.fws.gov/ to obtain more information and the permit application. If you have questions you can contact the FWS at (800) 358-2104. Overseas calls should be placed to (703) 358-2104.

How to Contact Us

If you need additional materials about importing hatching eggs of poultry or other birds into the United States, please contact us at:
USDA, APHIS, VS
National Center for Import and Export
4700 River Road, Unit 39
Riverdale, MD 20737
(301) 851-3300 Telephone
(301) 734-6402 Fax
 

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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Poultry Hatching Eggs

Procedures for Importing Poultry Hatching Eggs into the United States

ADVISORY: Until further notice, live avian commodities (including eggs for hatching) from the following countries or regions have been prohibited entry to the United States due to the presence of highly pathogenic avian influenza: Afghanistan, Albania, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cambodia, Djibouti, Egypt, Ghana, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Ivory Coast (Côte d'Ivoire), Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Laos, Macau, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestinian Autonomous Territories, People's Republic of China, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sudan, Taipei Chinese/Taiwan, Thailand, Togo, Turkey, Ukraine, and Vietnam..

The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines poultry as chickens, doves, ducks, geese, grouse, guinea fowl, partridges, pea fowl, pheasants, pigeons, quail, swans, and turkeys (including hatching eggs of these species).

General Requirements

All hatching eggs of poultry imported into the United States must be accompanied by a USDA import permit VS Form 17-129 (except through a land border port from Canada).
Current veterinary health certificate issued by a full-time salaried veterinarian of the agency responsible for animal health of the national government in the exporting country of origin.
Importers should submit the application and the processing fee for a permit by check, money order, charge card or by providing a USDA user fee account. If changes need to be made for a permit after it has been issued, there is an additional fee. Current fees can be found here.
Fees apply if arrival is during regular working hours (approximately 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM, Monday through Friday), and prior notification has been given. Overtime charges apply if the bird arrives before or after these hours. In addition, USDA port veterinarians are not stationed full-time at each port of entry, prior notification is critical to the import process.
Flock of origin veterinary health certification statements

The health certificate must be in English or a complete English translation must be provided. The veterinary health certificate must accompany the hatching eggs while in transit and must state that:

the flock or flocks of origin were found upon inspection to be free from evidence of communicable diseases of poultry;
no exotic Newcastle disease has occurred on the premises of origin or on adjoining premises during the 90 days immediately preceding the date of movement of the eggs from such region; and
as far as it has been possible to determine, such flock or flocks were not exposed to such disease during the preceding 90 days.
The flock of origin of hatching eggs imported from all countries except Canada are required to test serologically negative for egg drop syndrome (adenovirus 127), test negative on environmental culture for Salmonella enteritidis, and test serologically negative for viral turkey rhinotracheitis (avian pneumovirus) by a government approved laboratory. The flock of origin of hatching eggs from chicken-like poultry imported from Canada must be under a surveillance program similar to that of the USDA's National Poultry Improvement Plan.

The health certificates that accompany hatching egg shipments must indicate that:

Flocks of origin for the hatching eggs were not vaccinated against any H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza.
The shipment will not transit through any regions where APHIS considers highly pathogenic avian influenza to exist, as listed here on this web page.
The flocks of origin have been vaccinated against Newcastle disease (avian paramyxovirus) at least 21 days prior to export, using vaccines that do not contain any velogenic strains of Newcastle disease virus. OR:
The flocks of origin have not been vaccinated against Newcastle disease.
Some hatching eggs are required to be quarantined for a minimum of 30 days upon entry into the United States.
FDA Imported food requirement
Requirements for importing poultry hatching eggs differ for eggs being imported from countries designated and free of exotic Newcastle disease (END) than those not designated as free of END.

Poultry hatching eggs imported from countries designated as free of END

The following countries are considered by the USDA to be free of exotic Newcastle disease: Australia, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Denmark, Fiji, Finland, France, Greece, Great Britain (England, Scotland, Wales, and the Isle of Man), Iceland, Republic of Ireland, Luxembourg, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland.
Hatching eggs imported from these countries are not required to be quarantined. However, the hatching eggs must be accompanied by a veterinary health certificate issued by a national government veterinarian of the exporting country as well as by a USDA import permit (see exception for Canada below).
Poultry hatching eggs imported from countries not designated as free of END

In addition to the required veterinary health certificate and USDA import permit, importation of hatching eggs from countries not designated by the USDA to be free of END are restricted as follows:

Eggs must be transported from the port of entry to the hatchery in a vehicle sealed by the USDA.
Eggs must be hatched and brooded under the supervision of the Area Veterinarian in Charge (AVIC) in the State of destination. The hatchery must meet certain biosecurity standards and be inspected and approved by the AVIC prior to issuance of the import permit.
The poultry from such eggs must remain in quarantine for not less than 30 days following hatch.
During quarantine, the hatching eggs and poultry from such eggs are subject to any inspections, disinfections, and diagnostic testing as may be required by the USDA to determine their freedom from communicable diseases of poultry.
Poultry hatching eggs imported from Canada

Poultry hatching eggs imported from Canada must be accompanied by a veterinary health certificate issued by a Canadian government veterinarian. However, no quarantine is required for hatching eggs of Canadian origin. Those hatching eggs imported through a U.S.-Canadian land border port do not require a USDA import permit, whereas eggs entering the United States from Canada via air do require a USDA import permit.

The import permit application (VS Form 17-129) can be downloaded from the Internet at: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/library/forms/index.shtml#vs or by contacting us at:
USDA, APHIS, VS
National Center for Import and Export
4700 River Road, Unit 39
Riverdale, MD 20737
(301) 851-3300 Telephone
(301) 734-6402 Fax

Fish and Wildlife Service Permit Information
In the United States, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regulates the importation of avian species (including their hatching eggs) protected by various national and international acts and treaties such as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), the Wild Bird Conservation Act of 1992, the Migratory Bird Act, and the Endangered Species Act. To determine if the hatching eggs you wish to import are regulated by the USFWS, you can visit their web site at: http://permits.fws.gov/ or contact them at USFWS, Office of Management Authority, 4401 North Fairfax Drive, Room 420, Arlington, VA 22203, (800) 358-2104 (within the United States), or (703) 358-2104.

Please visit the FWS web site at: http://permits.fws.gov/ to obtain more information and the permit application. If you have questions you can contact the FWS at (800) 358-2104. Overseas calls should be placed to (703) 358-2104.

How to Contact Us

If you need additional materials about importing hatching eggs of poultry or other birds into the United States, please contact us at:
USDA, APHIS, VS
National Center for Import and Export
4700 River Road, Unit 39
Riverdale, MD 20737
(301) 851-3300 Telephone
(301) 734-6402 Fax
I trust you read what I have highlighted in BOLD text.....if you are getting hatching eggs from Canada those are the easiest to get into the USA! As I mentioned previously it is very expensive and/or quarantine is required. Good luck! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I did read it Called the Aphis and found out i was gonna get scammed .... Due to ends and other issues also talked to a pretty cool australian who is telling me how they are wanting to work with this breed too. WOW almost i love hem pretty sad that the egg layers have taken over the chicken world while the pure lines are slowly going away
like the Brahmas and Dominics and others i have never heard of .
 

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I did read it Called the Aphis and found out i was gonna get scammed .... Due to ends and other issues also talked to a pretty cool australian who is telling me how they are wanting to work with this breed too. WOW almost i love hem pretty sad that the egg layers have taken over the chicken world while the pure lines are slowly going away
like the Brahmas and Dominics and others i have never heard of .
TammyN, are you having any luck finding Dark Brahmas out your way??? Went to a poultry show here in Ohio last weekend and there were a bunch of Dark Brahmas on hand and some for sale!!! I actually picked up a young trio but they didn't last long, the second night a raccoon killed 2 of the 3?!?!? Not a very smart bird in my opinion, instead of getting in the coop they decided to wedge themselves behind it and the ***** got to them!!! Anyway, there are a few out there and I'm trying to get a small flock started myself (I used to raise Light Brahmas years ago). In addition to my Buckeyes, I am working on Dominiques, Black Australorps and Dark Cornish this year so why not Dark Brahmas, too! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Still looking I would like a trio .
I always let my birds stay in the coop and pen for 3 days so they learn where the bed and rest spots are .
so do you have a phone number or anything i may be able to call ?
Id like good stock not hatchery chicks . Its my favorite breed , Tammy
 

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Still looking I would like a trio .
I always let my birds stay in the coop and pen for 3 days so they learn where the bed and rest spots are .
so do you have a phone number or anything i may be able to call ?
Id like good stock not hatchery chicks . Its my favorite breed , Tammy
I picked up a young breeding pair this past weekend Tammy and the hen is laying but don't know the quality of the offspring yet?!?!? With any luck I will hatch some chicks in late May from this pair and let you know how they turn out!!! The first trio I picked up in early March didn't last long....**** got into the pen the very first night. Hope your having some luck finding a trio out your way!

Here is a pic of the cockerel;

 

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Very very nice!
Thanks EV!!! I've got a few chicks in the brooder, too but not sure these birds will make the cut come fall....think I will be looking for some better breeding stock?!?!? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have 4 show Brahmas I picked up from NY and new chicks from them SO hyped
 

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My dark brahmas are about 3 weeks old and they peck me every chance they get!! They will let me hold them and sit fine with me. But if I'm reaching in to change food and water they bite me like crazy. One had me do good I picked it up off the floor! It's only these 4 and mostly the larger 2 that do it. They are in a dog crate with 2 silkies and 5 barred rocks. No one else is like that. Is it just part of the breeds temperament?

I have a question about color as well. They are all dark brahmas but one of them is so dark it's almost black. The other three have brown heads and the difference is crazy. Is this a gender indication or just a variation in color? I'm adding a pic, the dark one is at the bottom surrounded by barred rocks. There's two more brahmas on both the left and right of the pic. Sorry that's all I have for now, I'm trying to get them adjusted to the coop so I'm not going to be able to get another pic till at least tomorrow

image-3980850083.jpg
 

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I have 4 show Brahmas I picked up from NY and new chicks from them SO hyped
That is GREAT news TammyN, I'm stoked for you, too!!! Let's keep in touch and maybe we can swap some chicks or hatching eggs this fall or next spring?!?!?!?

UPDATE : I now have Dark Brahma's from 3 different sources (all here in Ohio) and there is significant variation in the lines. One of the things I have learned quickly is feathering on the middle toe is critical and will disqualify a bird from showing. These more than likely should be culled, but I'm working with a nice cock that is nearly perfect in other areas but lacks a lot of feet feathering to see if I can improve this by breeding him to hens with loads of feet feathering! Only time will tell but for now I am working with 9 birds (3 trios) and I hope to have a bunch of chicks grown out this fall to select from for my breeding program.;)
 
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