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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read a few articles on coop training, saying you should keep your birds locked in the coop without letting them out for about a week to reinforce the idea of home. I'm curious as to how important it is to not let them out. It's just too warm during midday to keep them in there the entire time. I have been letting them out for at least a few hours a day than wrangling them up and putting them back around 4:30-5:30.

I haven't let them out the last two days, as its been rainy and cool. Should I just give it a go on Friday when it's supposed to be nice out and hope that I'm not chasing down 17 birds in the dark? Or should I just keep them in until next week and try then? They have been out in the coop since April 29th.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Any insight? I have all the stuff I need to clean the coop during the nice weather tomorrow if I can let them all out. Super nervous about it though.
 

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In would let them out, you may have to wait till almost dark before they go in on their own. All of mine have been going in on their own the last two nights. Before that they would be in but as soon as they would hear me come they would run out then I would have to catch them all lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They do go in and out on their own during the day. I will have my husband and 5 year old to help but even then it can be all three of us trying to corner one super fast chicken! I think I'm not going to have a choice as its supposed to be 75 tomorrow and until the trees have leaves the coop is right in the sun. It will be way too hot for them. I'm going to be so nervous all day though! I don't want to lose anybody!
 

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I've read a few articles on coop training, saying you should keep your birds locked in the coop without letting them out for about a week to reinforce the idea of home. I'm curious as to how important it is to not let them out. It's just too warm during midday to keep them in there the entire time. I have been letting them out for at least a few hours a day than wrangling them up and putting them back around 4:30-5:30.

I haven't let them out the last two days, as its been rainy and cool. Should I just give it a go on Friday when it's supposed to be nice out and hope that I'm not chasing down 17 birds in the dark? Or should I just keep them in until next week and try then? They have been out in the coop since April 29th.
I never used that method. We just rounded them up and chased them into the coop. They eventually learned to go in on their own for bedtime. We used "treats" too (sometimes a real treat, other times just their regular food; whatever is handy at the moment) for calling them in so they really wanted in. Now for the most part, we just call them in if they didn't make their way in already.
 

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I've read a few articles on coop training, saying you should keep your birds locked in the coop without letting them out for about a week to reinforce the idea of home. I'm curious as to how important it is to not let them out. It's just too warm during midday to keep them in there the entire time. I have been letting them out for at least a few hours a day than wrangling them up and putting them back around 4:30-5:30.

I haven't let them out the last two days, as its been rainy and cool. Should I just give it a go on Friday when it's supposed to be nice out and hope that I'm not chasing down 17 birds in the dark? Or should I just keep them in until next week and try then? They have been out in the coop since April 29th.
I never used that method. We just rounded them up and chased them into the coop. They eventually learned to go in on their own for bedtime. We used "treats" too (sometimes a real treat, other times just their regular food; whatever is handy at the moment) for calling them in so they really wanted in. Now for the most part, we just call them in if they didn't make their way in already.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah raisins have been my biggest ally. They are obsessed with them and mob me when they realize I have a handful. I'm giving it a go, as soon as it starts to warm up and dry out I'm opening the door and hoping for the best. My husband says if we lose one we lose one but my hope is to count out 17 at bedtime!
 

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You should make out fine. Mine when they were little like yours, learned to associate the shake of a bucket as snack time and would come running from all directions. I'd call them at the same time so they'd learn to come when called too. Now I can shake a bucket and/or call them and they'll come running. Pavlov training I learned in psychology about 4 years ago. ;) Once you get them trained to come for food, take the food away and still call them, offer the food again the next day. Varying it keeps it in their minds that there "might" be a treat so you will still get the same response from them. Who'd have thought, psychology would come in so handy for dealing with chickens hey. :D
 

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When we get any new birds, after quarantine, everyone is "grounded" in the coop except the guineas (they get too crabby being confined) for 5 days to adjust to the coop and the other birds. We keep fans in the coop, so ventilation is not an issue, and neither is heat.

ETA:

You can't always just "throw and go" as my bf calls it, but I don't like catching chickens in the dark that get lost. Lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Barred rock rooster won't come in :mad: going to try grabbing him on my own in a little bit but its getting really dark out...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
He's out there screaming for the others but when i get near him he takes off like crazy. I'd rather not lose him but I'm not sure we will be able to get him in tonight. He's just calling attention to himself as it gets darker and darker. I even tried sitting on the ground with one of the calmer chicks that just settles on me and he still wouldn't come to us. Any advice?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Got him!! My neighbor was outside and she saw me trying to chase him down. With a broom and a screen we got him! Laughing the entire time. If he keeps pulling this I might let nature take its course. Everyone else knew it was bedtime!
 

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lol I can just picture it lol When our ladies first started roosting in our red pin tree last year my husband and I would do everything we could to knock them out of the tree to get them in the coop. He use to chase the once on the ground to get them to run into the coop but half the time they flew back into the tree lol After doing this all summer we finally gave up and just let them roost outside at night.
 

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A long handled fishing net can really be your best friend when it comes to herding up chickens, It gives you another 4 feet or so of reach, and it can also keep a pissy little rooster about 4 feet away from you when he wants to attack! And I have had to use the net to catch spooked chickens, too. I wouldn't take anything for it. :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well he's gone. Second night in a row that my barred rock roo wouldn't go to bed. After husband and I chased him around he took off into the woods. I've been out there 4 times calling to him, listening for him and pleading him to come home.

Now that it's completely dark out there is no chance I am looking for him anymore. After my skunk encounter I just can't bring myself to be in the backyard after dark. There is supposed to be a frost tonight so even if he is hiding somewhere safe from predators I doubt he will make it through the nights temps.

I feel terrible but I'm not sure there's anything I can do :-/
 
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