Coop Building Progress

Discussion in 'Coops, Runs and Housing' started by TomC, Apr 14, 2020.

  1. TomC

    TomC Active Member

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    STSF8487.JPG IMG_0874.JPG IMG_0875.JPG IMG_0876.JPG IMG-0888.jpg I posted some pics and a brief description of my coop building in my introduction post. But decided that that wasn't really the proper place to do a continuing thread. So, I am re-posting those pics here and will be adding more as I go along. PLEASE, feel free to comment, recommend, and put your two cents in.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 14, 2020
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  2. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    You know we won't hesitate to toss in our two cents. :D

    What is that on the deck?

    And have you figured out what roof line you're going to have?
     
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  3. TomC

    TomC Active Member

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    That is linoleum on the floor. I read that it makes it much, much easier to clean than just plain plywood. There is a discount floor covering store about 5 miles away and I got a really good deal on a remnant.
     
  4. TomC

    TomC Active Member

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    IMG-0891.jpg IMG-0892.jpg IMG-0893.jpg Here is today's progress. It is going to have a slant roof. I chose a slant roof for a couple of reasons. First, a slant roof is much easier to build and buying pre-built trusses would be allot more expensive. Second, I believe that a slant roof allows for better ventilation. Heat tends to get trapped and build up in a gabled roof. The slant in one direction should allow the heat to rise along the roof and then exit along higher side, creating a natural airflow. At least that's my theory.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 14, 2020
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  5. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Everything I've heard from others that choice of flooring is ideal for cleaning and it wears quite well.

    Great choice on the shed roof, not only is it easier to build it makes it a heck of a lot easier to deal with water shedding.

    Where is the run going to be?
     
  6. TomC

    TomC Active Member

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    You are looking at the coop from the Southeast corner. The run is going to be to the north and west of the coop, sort of an "L" shape on the back side of the coop.
     
  7. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    You're place looks like mine having to take into consideration all of the trees present.

    They're great for shade in the hot humid SE but dang they make me nervous during big storms.
     
  8. TomC

    TomC Active Member

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    Here's a Google Earth view of my place with an approximate location of the coop and run. Trees... I've got trees to spare. That's why I'm hoping to build the runs sitting on the ground, rather than trying to dig holes for posts. The one's I dug for the coop were a serious pain. Also, another reason that the next coop will probably be built on runners. CHicken Coop Location.jpg
     
  9. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    I don't have a lot of open ground but I'm here to tell you I've got about double of what you have. Or maybe not. From an aerial view mine looks about like yours because of the tree tops.
     
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  10. TomC

    TomC Active Member

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    When we bought this place about 4 years ago, one of the first things we did, was cut down between 50 and 60 trees in the front yard in hopes that we could get some grass to grow (still working on that too) and to get them farther away from the house. There were several large oaks with 12 - 16 inch limbs overhanging the roof. This shot is only of about 2 acres or so and was taken after we cut the trees down. We have 18 total and the only clear area is about 1/2 acre on each of the far North corners.
     
  11. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    I've got the same concern here with the big limbs hanging over the house. I have to get some tree people out here to do something about them.

    I can tell where they took up a bunch of trees here, I'm starting to see sink holes where the trunks used to be. I stepped in one area that I sunk to mid shin. Scared me to no end.
     
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  12. TomC

    TomC Active Member

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    I got really lucky with the trees, my youngest brother is an arborist for a company that trims trees along power lines. His boss let him bring the bucket truck and chipper over one weekend. All it cost me was fuel and barbecue on the grill when we were done. I'd hate to think what it would've cost otherwise.
     
  13. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    That's the only thing that has stopped me from calling anyone yet. Some of the limbs are as big around as some decent sized trees. Well, they're Oaks so you know what I'm talking about.

    I watched them during hurricane Michael, I'll tell you they were rock steady in the high winds.
     
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  14. TomC

    TomC Active Member

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    IMG_0896.JPG IMG_0897.JPG Not allot of progress today, my help didn't show up and I was working by myself. But, I did get the last wall built and stood up. Hopefully, I can get the rafters and roof sheeting on tomorrow, but it's supposed to rain, so, we'll see. The pics today are from a different angle.
     
  15. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    It's got to be eating at you not to have it done with those babies doubling in size everyday. It's looking good. That roof is going to save you a ton of time.
     
  16. TomC

    TomC Active Member

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    IMG_0900.JPG IMG_0901.JPG IMG_0902.JPG WE HAVE A ROOF!!! Not been able to work on it for a couple of days because of work and some other things going on (refridgerator shot craps). But, got the roof on today, and plan on working on the nesting boxes tomorrow. If the weather and my help shows up, I'm hoping to be able to move in new residents by the end of the weekend. IMG_0900.JPG IMG_0900.JPG IMG_0902.JPG
     
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  17. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Hurray, this can't happen fast enough for the girls. They've got to be busting out of that brooder by now.

    Out of curiosity, did you do birds mouth on the rafters? And really, it is only curiosity because I maybe doing some work on my own shed since so much of the roof structure is rotted. Well, actually the whole thing was built wrong from the get go. The only thing worth saving are the 4X4 PT posts.

    Your roof has more pitch then mine but it's essentially the same idea. It's just one was done right, the other not so much.
     
  18. TomC

    TomC Active Member

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    Yes, I did bird mouth the rafters, but only enough to get a full flat surface on top of the wall, it's only about 1" deep. The roof is a 3/12 pitch, it may be just a bit shallow, a 4/12 pitch would probably be better, but I wanted to be able to walk all the way up to the back wall without having to bend over much, so it's 5 foot. I also didn't want to go over an 8 foot wall in the front. So, with a 12 foot width, I have a 3/12 pitch. I may have to keep an eye on it if we get a really heavy snow, but I'm also going to put a support beam down the center. I wasn't planning on doing that 'til I got my big butt up there nailing down plywood, it was a little more springy than I like.
     
  19. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Mine doesn't have much pitch at all. I wasn't even certain it had any until I saw rain run off the back. But I don't have to worry about snow loads either.

    The shed I want to redo is 20 by 20, sort of. There isn't much square about it which will make rehabbing it even more of a challenge.

    What I did not want to read is that you did the birdsmouth cuts. I watched hubs figuring the angle and depth for them when we built our house in GA. He was a carpenter, he knows that stuff yet it took him awhile to get the cut just the way he wanted it.

    Instead of the birdsmouth I can probably add new rafters the same way floor joists are installed. I'll have to study on that for a while.
     
  20. TomC

    TomC Active Member

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    I've seen guys take out a framing square and start laying out birds mouth and stairs and stuff like that, I admire them, but I can't do it, makes my head hurt. I think what I did was easier, I got my walls up then laid an uncut rafter along the side, like it's supposed to sit, then traced the wall outline on it, then used that one as the pattern to make the others.
     
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