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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My set-up for my waterfowl (ducks and geese) is a bit different than most - They have a large coop where they are housed overnight. Though we have a large farm we also have many predators, so I don't just let them out to wander during the day. When I let them out of their coop in the morning they file into our fenced yard to spend the day. This means they have no access to their coop during the day. Not been a problem for my runner ducks, since they normally lay all their eggs before 9 AM, I just wait until then to let them out and have only found a few eggs in the yard.

Now my goose is laying - 8 eggs in 15 days and it's a big problem. I really want her to go broody and hatch out some goslings. I'm getting all sorts of conflicting advice about how to accomplish this; especially since she can't get to her nest during the day.

I was told to take her eggs, date them and store them. I tried that. She simply moved her nest to a different box every time I took an egg; even when I substituted fake eggs. I gave her back the stored eggs. She now uses the same box every time. She tends to the eggs every evening when they go to bed, sitting on them every night, but wants out with the rest of the waterfowl in the morning. She hasn't plucked down for the nest yet, but does keep it neat and does turn the eggs. I know with my chickens when a hen decides to go broody I couldn't get her off the nest with a crowbar. Won't my goose be the same way when she decides to get serious about brooding? Plus, now I have all these "half-baked" eggs I'm going to have to toss and that kills me.

Then I was told to lock her and my gander up in the coop. They want out. Wouldn't they be reluctant to come out in the morning with the ducks if they wanted to stay and tend the eggs? I hate the thought of cooping them up for 30 days against their will.

Next I was told to make a place for them in our fenced yard to confine them to until she's ready to sit full-time. This would be a possibility if I buy another pen to place within the yard. It would protect them from most, but not all the predators we have.

I really want some goslings from this pair, but am disheartened about how I going to accomplish this with our set-up.

Any insight or recommendations? Much appreciated.

Note: I cracked open her first egg. It was fertile.
 

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Premium Member
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3,157 Posts
Can you set up a temp run at the coop so she can be penned with access to the coop? Or maybe just leave her in the coop a couple days see if she goes broody then just leave her in the coop while she sits.
 

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I am no help to you, but I hope you can figure something out. That is to bad about throwing the eggs out. Maybe she will never sit on eggs. I heard they like to wait and sit on alot but what is alot?!
 

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Flocker
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I would suggest either getting an inexpensive incubator, or finding someone close that may incubate some eggs for you. That way, you will have your goslings, and if she eventually does go broody, then you will have more. It's like chicken math for geese. One plus one equals lots!!! Good luck!!
 

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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would suggest either getting an inexpensive incubator, or finding someone close that may incubate some eggs for you. That way, you will have your goslings, and if she eventually does go broody, then you will have more. It's like chicken math for geese. One plus one equals lots!!! Good luck!!
Fuzzie, I think you are what my friends and I call an enabler. ;)

I actually have two incubators. The brinsea eco wouldn't hold goose eggs. The still air would and it's an easy task to convert it to a forced air. Problem is, I don't like to incubate, having bad results every time I've tried.

At any rate, the problem has been solved for us. My goose laid another egg in the yard yesterday; her second time of laying two days in a row. I carried the egg to her nest in the coop. She followed behind me, got on the nest and hasn't left it. My gander stood guard just outside the coop until dark, then joined her. Today the geese will be locked in the coop while we will set about constructing a small pen attached to the coop where they can spend their days. The ducks can continue to spend their days in the fenced yard.

My only confusion at this point is why she hasn't plucked down for the nest. She has it nicely cleaned and constructed, just no down. Could it be that their coop is warm by waterfowl standards?

Thanks for the replies. :)
 

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My only confusion at this point is why she hasn't plucked down for the nest. She has it nicely cleaned and constructed, just no down. Could it be that their coop is warm by waterfowl standards?

Thanks for the replies. :)[/QUOTE]

I wouldnt worry, she'll fill it with feathers soon enough. Its probubly because she just started.
 

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How old is your goose? She simply hasn't decided that sitting is more important than being with the flock. Young domestic waterfowl typically display this behavior. If it were me, I would do one of two things. Collect for 7 days and incubate; or, segregate her from the others if/when she decides to turn on the "momma" switch. Only she can decide that though! If she does sit and hatches, I would keep her segregated from the flock until her goslings were at least feathered out. The other flock members may not mess with the goslings, but then again I've seen ganders kill goslings, especially if they did not father them (propagation of their genes vs. another gander's genes). Good Luck!
 
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