Coccidiosis

Discussion in 'Emergencies, Illness, Meds & Cures' started by sorrowsmiles, Dec 9, 2012.

  1. sorrowsmiles

    sorrowsmiles New Member

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    I'm pretty sure my four month olds are suffering from coccidiosis. They are currently housed in greenhouse type structure with concrete flooring. Anyone know how I can decontaminate the concrete so they don't keep getting afflicted?? Thanks!
     
  2. CharlieEcho

    CharlieEcho Junior Member

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    Bleach;

    Where we live it's hard to sanitize in this cold weather. We do it a couple times a year when we clean the hen house. Brush all the ledges and scrape and sweep out all the debris. Then we spray or splash the floor and lower walls with a mixture of household bleach and water. Then we leave the hen house opened to air and dry. We don't allow the birds inside until it's dry. During the winter months we just change the bedding when it gets built up. I like to keep the bedding and floors as dry as possible.

    We use a similar method in our barn stalls with dirt floors. It's much harder with the dirt floor as you might expect. Also if it is as you suspect, in only your four month old birds, shouldn't they be seperated from the other birds? If I recall birds can develop an immunity.
     

  3. sorrowsmiles

    sorrowsmiles New Member

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    Thanks for the info! They are seperated from our hens when they sleep-they all range in the backyard during the day, though. Something they aren't interested in doing when they're sick, so luckily the hens never got it.
    The bleach/water mixture won't discolor the concrete at all?
     
  4. CharlieEcho

    CharlieEcho Junior Member

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    Concrete;

    If the bleach mixture does change the color of our concrete it isn't readily
    noticeable. If a person had colored concrete as I've seen in a few up-town markets bleach may lighten it. Natural concrete I'm not concerned with. You could scrub with a soap mixture also. I'm concenred about disinfecting the area and bleach does that. It doesn't have to be a strong mixture but I like to be able to smell the bleach.

    There is a formula recomended for sanitizing water wells and storage containers we have used before. Only if we have had to open the wells for maintenance of some kind. I don't have it handy, ie; the formula, but bleach used safely is used for a number of sanitation projects.
     
  5. sorrowsmiles

    sorrowsmiles New Member

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    Awesome, thanks a bunch!!
     
  6. qcupoultry

    qcupoultry New Member

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    The effectiveness of bleach is reduced when it contacts organic material, so I use a product called Oxine. It's a bleach chemical, but organics don't stop it from doing its work. Oxine is very safe and has no odor. It can even be added to drinking water or put in a mist unit. I use Oxine to sanitize my incubators as well. Fantastic stuff.
     
  7. CharlieEcho

    CharlieEcho Junior Member

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    Never heard of this;

    I have never heard of this product. I will check on it. We have just always used bleach because it was recomended by the US Geological Water Group at our local university. Not as many as there used to be but there were a lot of water wells providing the water to farmsteads in our area. There is now "city" water provided in the last ten years.

    There is a formula used for the diameter of the well and depth of water at the time of treating. If you open the well to change the pumps or valves it's recomended to treat the water well. I beleive for a gallon of water only a couple of drops is required.

    I know there are also other disinfectents available at places like Lowes that also work. I don't mind the smell of bleach. My brother treats the water for a small community near here. The clorine they use will not only turn you jeans white, it will eat a hole in them. Very strong stuff and very heavily diluted into the drinking water.