Other Chicken Coops - Design, Construction and Maintenance

Discussion in 'Products / Feed / Coops' started by spark, May 2, 2014.

  1. spark

    spark New Member

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    Hello!

    I decided to create this thread to share as much as receive information on building chicken coops.
    I found this very interesting link that has a set of plans to build beautiful chicken.
    Share with you:

    http://chickencoops-guide.blogspot.com

    I would like to know opinions and experiences you have had!

    Greetings :)
     
  2. hellofromtexas

    hellofromtexas New Member

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    It has a couple fixable flaws.

    They all have one design flaw, They don't bury a 6in to 12 in of hardware cloth or other digging proof methods. They may all have modifications to make them predator proof for your area. I focus of digging predators (like dogs and possums) and hawks because that's what I have. However my coop could not withstand a polar bear (look at my username and you will see why I don't worry about polar bears). Predator proofing varies from area to area.

    The other flaw they have is budget. I have never heard of a small coop in my area built for $150 with reclaimed lumber let alone new materials. Their budget is flawed because it looks at building with out problems and in the most ideal location for materials. No bank would accept this budget plan for building anything. You may want to do your own pricing based on your area. Then, double the budget for human error. The goal would be to come under that budget but giving yourself a contingency for the multiple errors of building projects in general.

    The third flaw is their timeline. They do this to make it sound good. But the average person who has done this will tell you it didn't take a weekend unless it was a very small design or there was a lot of help. It's the nothing gets in the way timeline. Again, a bank would not accept this timeline from a business stand point. Consider weather, and natural daily life that would get in the way, there is no way to pause or control any of it. So depend on where you are building, you may want to allow a sick day, or two, and maybe plan for rainy days too. Again, the goal is to finish ahead of schedule.

    So in conclusion, the flaws are some minor design flaws you can fix, the budget may be off, and the build timeline.

    All this can be fixed with using the logic and a little extra planning. The flaws appear to be to sell their product.
     

  3. Fiere

    Fiere New Member

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    They aren't really off in their budget or build timeline. I built my 8x6 coop with a 16x8 run for about 175$ and it took me about... 20 hours? None of the lumber was reclaimed, all 1/2" plywood and spruce. The shingles we got on clearance, the door for the coop was off another shed and the 2x3 window I got out of a garbage heap. It looks very similar to coop plan #2 actually.
    They say their coops are customizable, so if you worry about digging predators, modify it. Worry about flying ones, modify it again.

    Time and budget entirely depends on how handy you are and how familiar you are with the local hardware stores, lumber mills, how much reclaimed wood you have, ect. Reclaiming wood will normally take longer as it's more prep work than just buying new lumber. Shopping around is also paramount. Home Depot might be cheaper for the studs but Lowes might be better for sheeting. You might look in the local classifieds and see someone selling a baby barn for a few hundred, and when you factor in your materials and time, you might just rather pick that up!

    I am a scavenger, first and foremost. The workload is as I stated, more involved as I have to prep all the wood then modify it, as I won't get exact lengths and what not, but it's cheaper. I had over estimated the size I was going to build a barn so the left over wood I build the aforementioned coop with and still have some left over.

    I like so e of the plans I see on the site. Love looking at new plans,never know when you'll get an idea or find something worth incorporating.
     
  4. spark

    spark New Member

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    Many thanks for the reply!

    Have you ever tried to build some using these plans?
    Do you have some friends who have already experienced?

    greetings :)
     
  5. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    I think most of us have built coops very similar to the designs on the website. What is important is to look at your needs as well as the birds. How easy is access for cleaning, food and water. Can you stand upright and have enough room to use a shovel?

    I had water and a laundry tub in my coop. It made my life so much easier when it came to cleaning 20 waterers. So, none of these plans would have worked for me since none are large enough for individual breeding pens.
     
  6. Fiere

    Fiere New Member

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    I've never used "plans" to build my coop. I know what I want and I build it. Plans enable me to get a few ideas to incorporate here and there sometimes, but I'm pretty fly by night when it comes to my builds. I have a lot of birds, and breed them, so everything has to be able to function the way I want it to. I work on a fixed budget and with a lot of reclaimed lumber, and I like simple. Its hard to find a plan that works for me, much easier to incorporate ideas. Most of my builds are plain square buildings, with plain square runs, and then when you walk inside there's little things that set them apart.

    And nope, I've never had any friends use that site. They're all pretty much like me in their builds. They do what works for them, most incorporate the structures they already have like horse barns or garages, etc. I don't have many friends who keep chickens and those that do aren't the little flock keepers who would most benefit from that site.