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Usually my field will be filled with feathers.
Literally you can't even see the grass it's all just feathers. Do they molt every season? Like spring, summer, fall and winter? Or just once a year?
Cause usually I don't pay much attention to that stuff.
I think my chickens are molting because there are lots of feathers in my run and egg production has slowed down. I was getting 5 or 6 each day but now 3 or 4. I have 6 laying hens. The odd thing is too look at my chickens, you can't tell anything different. They don't look any different but there feathers are on the ground. How long does this last?
 

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Some breeds are continuous molters that lose a few feathers at a time all year long, but never get a patchy look. My serama are such a breed. My Phoenix do molt heavily, so when they molt it is obvious.
I didn't realize some breeds were continuous molters, thanks for pointing that out! I don't have any Seramas, but I hope I can get my hands on some silkied ones some day! 😍




She kinda looks like a mom who hasn’t had her stiff cup of coffee yet!
Bird Phasianidae Beak Comb Chicken
Awww, the dear! She does have quite the look, doesn't she? :ROFLMAO:

So, she's not a White Australorp as that breed has slate-colored legs regardless of the variety and she does not. It looks to me like she has yellow skin that has faded, which can occur naturally over a laying cycle, especially in white hens and hens who lay a lot of eggs, so that would most likely make her a White Plymouth Rock.





Wow, must be a white australorp then, she looks just like the one in the picture. Are orphingtons and australorps related? I'm reading something in the bottom of the picture saying that they are. Unless I'm reading it wrong..
Yes, Australorps and Orpingtons are related, in fact! :giggle: The Australorp started out as the Australian Orpington (note the underlined portions), bred for utility from Black Orpingtons that were imported from England to Australia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Awww, the dear! She does have quite the look, doesn't she? :ROFLMAO:

So, she's not a White Australorp as that breed has slate-colored legs regardless of the variety and she does not. It looks to me like she has yellow skin that has faded, which can occur naturally over a laying cycle, especially in white hens and hens who lay a lot of eggs, so that would most likely make her a White Plymouth Rock.
Yeah, poor thing doesn’t even have much of a tail right now, but the new feathers are coming in already, so it shouldn’t be too much longer, I hope!

I don’t know if she is an Astralorp or not, but all the pictures of White Plymouth Rocks have yellow legs, and she has never had any shade of yellow on her legs. At this point in time I think several of my chickens are just mixed anomalies, and I am just thankful they are so cool!

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Oh, interesting, I'd assumed that her legs and beak were yellow and had just faded. 🤔 If her legs and beak have never been yellow, though, then some sort of mix is possible. That or a White Orpington, but I'm not sure how common those are. Where did you get her?
 

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I didn't realize some breeds were continuous molters, thanks for pointing that out! I don't have any Seramas, but I hope I can get my hands on some silkied ones some day! 😍






Awww, the dear! She does have quite the look, doesn't she? :ROFLMAO:

So, she's not a White Australorp as that breed has slate-colored legs regardless of the variety and she does not. It looks to me like she has yellow skin that has faded, which can occur naturally over a laying cycle, especially in white hens and hens who lay a lot of eggs, so that would most likely make her a White Plymouth Rock.







Yes, Australorps and Orpingtons are related, in fact! :giggle: The Australorp started out as the Australian Orpington (note the underlined portions), bred for utility from Black Orpingtons that were imported from England to Australia.
Oh ok I see, wow!
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Oh, interesting, I'd assumed that her legs and beak were yellow and had just faded. 🤔 If her legs and beak have never been yellow, though, then some sort of mix is possible. That or a White Orpington, but I'm not sure how common those are. Where did you get her?
I bought her with my other hens from a lady that lives near me. She just had a brooder full of mixed chicks.
 

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Thanks! I can’t quit looking at her! White feathers show wear the most, so she had been looking so raggedy for a while.
I used to have a white rock who had beautiful white feathers but she just never stayed cleaned, she either had dirt or poop on her.
 
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