Bubbles in eye

Discussion in 'Chit-Chat' started by Maryellen, Nov 14, 2017.

  1. Maryellen

    Maryellen Well-Known Member

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    A friend of mine just called me,her one hen has some bubbles in her eye and is sneezing. She lives in upstate ny on a mountain that is cold and damp. Every time I go visit her I bring a sweatshirt due to the weather. It's yucky there now, been damp and cold for a few days, then warm, then back to damp and cold.
    I told her to remove the hen who has the eye bubbles and sneezing and to give denagard if she had it, she said she only has tylan . That should be good right? Or does she need denagard? She said usually they are sneezing only but this hen has eye bubbles
     
  2. seminolewind

    seminolewind Scrooged Staff Member

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    Birds don't care don't catch colds from cold. Tylang-ylang is actually the best. Quarantine her.
    Do not go over there or let her come over.
     
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  3. Maryellen

    Maryellen Well-Known Member

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    I haven't been there in 2 weeks and don't plan on it. I told her what to give hopefully she does and quarantines it
     
  4. Maryellen

    Maryellen Well-Known Member

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    She doesn't buy chickens either, she hatched out her own from a few she had, and she said now all her hens are molting and sneezing. I told her to clean everything too
     
  5. Maryellen

    Maryellen Well-Known Member

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    What could it be? A woman on the fb forum in upstate ny said her birds had MG they got from a new bird she bought that she quarantined. She had the ny state AG come in and half her birds tested positive for it,she was told it's running rampant up there
     
  6. Maryellen

    Maryellen Well-Known Member

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    I have been there since Oct 28. Thankfully.
     
  7. boskelli1571

    boskelli1571 Active Member

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    My best guess was going to be MG - it is treatable with the appropriate antibiotics, but it is not curable. It will recur periodically. One bird can infect the whole flock.
     
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  8. Maryellen

    Maryellen Well-Known Member

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    I let her know and sent her a link to mg. I won't be visiting her anymore, she can also keep one of my cages I lent her as if it is mg I don't want the cage back.
     
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  9. Maryellen

    Maryellen Well-Known Member

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    Spoke to my friend Missy tonight, she said her coop is covered in dust inside, she uses sand and pdz like me and said she never had an issue till she switched. She is going to use pine shavings this weekend , said everything was dusty and when she tried to clean a spot the dust that rose up.was bad. She is treating everyone with tylan anyway just to be safe and is getting rid of the sand and pdz, said the pdz is bad even in her horse stalls
     
  10. seminolewind

    seminolewind Scrooged Staff Member

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    Isn't there some respiratory ailment that passes through the egg?
     
  11. Maryellen

    Maryellen Well-Known Member

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    I think that's mg that does. She is panicking, as she hatched out silkie bantams and sold hatching eggs to someone
     
  12. seminolewind

    seminolewind Scrooged Staff Member

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    Is that one of those NPIP things?
     
  13. Maryellen

    Maryellen Well-Known Member

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    No she isn't npip, she sells local.where she is, she doesn't ship.. the MG supposedly is bad in upstate ny, I don't know if it's near her though. She is in lower Hudson Valley
     
  14. Maryellen

    Maryellen Well-Known Member

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    Npip doesn't test for mg, that you have to pay for or pay your vet to do blood tests to send out
     
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  15. boskelli1571

    boskelli1571 Active Member

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    MG will pass through the egg, newly hatched chicks will obviously get it from the mother or other infected flock member.
    The only way to effectively eradicate it is to cull the flock, disinfect & clean run, coop, equipment etc. and let the area 'sit' for a while, preferably in warmer weather before re-populating.
    You can get your flock tested for MG by the NPIP folks, but it costs $$
     
  16. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Boskelli. Poultry MG/MS doesnt have a cell wall, it can only last 3 days in the environment if in fact it's a mycoplasma disease. However, it's not uncommon for birds to have two or more diseases at once, for example; MG and Coryza, MG and ILT. Course times would be longer, including contaminated coops, waterers, feeders etc...
    It's best to cull, disinfect everything and wait a year before repopulating.
    Sick birds dont lay eggs, stress causes symptoms to reappear, antibiotics become useless over time not to mention withdrawal times for eggs and slaughter for meat. Birds that arnt sick are carriers of whatever respiratory disease(s) they have, and will spread it to newly acquired birds.
     
  17. Maryellen

    Maryellen Well-Known Member

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    I just found this, apparently npip does test for this stuff


    USDA - APHIS United States Department of Agriculture
    Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
    National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP)

    Animal Health / Veterinary Accreditation / NVAP Reference Guide / Poultry

    Veterinary Accreditation

    Questions, Comments, or Technical Issues?
    Preface
    Introduction
    Table of Contents
    Control and Eradication
    Poultry
    National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP)
    Avian Influenza (AI)
    Exotic Newcastle disease (END)
    Equine
    Aquatic Animal
    Animal Health Emergency Management
    Cleaning and Disinfection
    Disease Surveillance
    Laboratory Submissions
    Animal Movement
    Animal Identification
    Compliance and Regulations
    Appendix

    National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP)
    Last Modified: Apr 11, 2017

    The NPIP is a voluntary State–Federal cooperative testing and certification program for poultry breeding flocks, baby chicks, poults, hatching eggs, hatcheries, and dealers. It became operative in 1935 with a three-pronged focus on certifying breeding stock, bird performance, and the elimination of bacillary white diarrhea (caused by Salmonella pullorum). The objective of the NPIP is to provide a cooperative State–Federal program through which new technology can effectively be applied to the improvement of poultry and poultry products by establishing standards for the evaluation (testing) of poultry breeding stock, baby chicks, poults, and hatching eggs with respect to freedom from certain diseases.

    The diseases covered by the NPIP are avian influenza (fowl plague) and those produced by S. pullorum (pullorum disease), S. gallinarum (fowl typhoid), S. enterica var. enteritidis, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG, chronic respiratory disease, and infectious sinusitis in turkeys), M. synoviae (MS, infectious synovitis), and M. meleagridis (MM, day-old airsacculitis). In addition, the NPIP has programs such as “U.S. Salmonella Monitored” and “U.S. Sanitation Monitored” that are intended to reduce the incidence of salmonella organisms in hatching eggs, chicks, and poults through effective and practical sanitation procedures at the breeder farm and in the hatchery.

    Poultry is defined in the NPIP as domesticated fowl, including chickens, turkeys, ostriches, emus, rheas, cassowaries, waterfowl, and game birds (except doves and pigeons) that are bred primarily to produce eggs and meat. Three types of participants are involved in the NPIP: independent flocks, hatcheries, and dealers. The poultry products certified by the NPIP are hatching eggs, baby chicks, poults, and started pullets. The vast majority of U.S. States prohibit the entry of any poultry shipments except those designated pullorum- typhoid clean. Essentially, such bans mean that poultry moving interstate should participate in the “U.S. Pullorum-Typhoid Clean” program of the NPIP or be tested negative for pullorum-typhoid before leaving their home State. Fifteen States require that all shipments of turkeys they receive be MG clean. Essentially, that requirement means that turkeys moving interstate should participate in the “U.S. MG Clean” program of the NPIP or be tested free of MG before shipment.

    Most U.S. trading partners importing poultry and products from the United States also require NPIP participation. Accredited veterinarians may be requested to inspect breeder flocks participating in the NPIP for compliance with the standards and to issue health certifications. Every spring, APHIS publishes a directory of participants handling egg-type and meat-type chickens and turkeys and a directory of participants handling waterfowl, exhibition poultry, game birds, and ratites. These directories list hatcheries, independent flocks, and dealers participating in the NPIP, the products that they handle, and the disease classifications that they participate in.

    Other information about the program can be obtained from the:

    NPIP, USDA–APHIS –VS
    1506 Klondike Rd, Suite 300
    Conyers, GA 30094

    Information can also be obtained on the NPIP Web site:
    http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/animal_dis_spec/poultry/
    USDA.gov | Policies & Links | Accessibility Statement | Privacy Policy | Non-Discrimination Statement | Information Quality | USA.gov | Whitehouse.gov
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  18. boskelli1571

    boskelli1571 Active Member

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    I believe they will test for almost anything but the owner will have to pay for any tests other than those they sanction - such as AI and pullorum
     
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  19. Maryellen

    Maryellen Well-Known Member

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    You're probably right.
     
  20. seminolewind

    seminolewind Scrooged Staff Member

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    I believe they test for diseases that can be passed thru an egg and other ones . It's unclear to me what the reasoning is to test for some and not ohers? Why are those diseases picked above others? Vertically passed? Carriers?