Broody this early??

Discussion in 'Broody Hens & Egg Laying' started by lorindaeb, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. lorindaeb

    lorindaeb Junior Member

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    My buff orp is 6 1/2 months old. Tonight when I went to collect eggs, around 8pm, I opened the nest box door and she is sitting in there, screeching at me an all puffed up. I grabbed the two eggs in the other box and left her alone, thinking she must be laying an egg. I came back 45 min later and she was still there. I picked her up, protesting of course and took out the two other eggs without her seeing. Is this normal? At what age do they normally go broody? She isn't aggressive, thank goodness, but it seems so strange this early. And will she stay there for long? She won't go to the roost. It's cold here 29 degrees, and I don't want here to freeze.
     
  2. MommyWoes

    MommyWoes New Member

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    That's normal. Generally my girls don't stay broody unless I leave the eggs in there. Once I remove the eggs the hens check out the nesting area then go about their business... until there's another egg.
     

  3. 7chicks

    7chicks New Member

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    Josie has been broody for at least 3 weeks now. (Ameraucana) She's 7 months old. I take the eggs every day and if I'm home a couple times a day I make sure to grab them. Poor sweetie gets so peturbed with me. I too have been wondering how much longer is this going to last. Doesn't help when I am gone Thursday nights, hubby doesn't take out any of the eggs. Only other one I've had be broody was my Australorp this summer at a little over a yr old. For her it lasted about a week and was done.
     
  4. lorindaeb

    lorindaeb Junior Member

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    I removed the golf balls. I'm hoping the girls continue to lay eggs there now that I've removed them. This morning I took her out if the box and set her in the ground with the others. Guess I'll keep doing this till she gets the hint. She protested quite a bit, but then shook herself and ran off to the other girls. I guess I didn't expect this so soon after starting to lay. Oh well. :)
     
  5. Keith

    Keith New Member

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    I'm still using golf balls in our nesting boxes, our current flock is 8 months (Buffs and Reds). Why did you remove them, try to prevent going broody?
     
  6. lorindaeb

    lorindaeb Junior Member

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    I removed the golf balls to see if she will stop trying to lay on them. If I find that my other girls are laying eggs elsewhere then I'll put them back. Otherwise if they continue to lay in the nest box, then I'll leave them out. I have kept them in the box for a few months already, so I think they get the idea. I don't think there's a right or wrong answer with leaving the golf balls in place or not. Just your preference. I'm hoping my buff orp will stop this broody business or its gonna be a long winter. LOL! I don't have a rooster, so no need for her to do this, even though it is natural.
     
  7. Keith

    Keith New Member

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    I lack a rooster now as well, only one we lost to a raccoon. I plan on leaving the golf balls in a vain attempt to trick snakes. We still have large breed snakes and I put golf balls out in the pastures surrounding the coop but with our predator luck I think it's only a matter of time before a snake finds the coop.
     
  8. Sundancers

    Sundancers New Member

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    You can give a broody hen a few days "Time Out." I have good size dog crate I use just for them. Give her food, water and a roost but no bedding in which to nest.

    2 or 3 days she will be ready to go to the coop, if not give her a few more days.
     
  9. kaufranc

    kaufranc Junior Member

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    I am with Sundancers . We have a few Cochins that go broody from time to time . We have a crate that has a wire/mesh bottom, so that air can circulate under her and by the 2nd day she is ready to be out!
     
  10. lorindaeb

    lorindaeb Junior Member

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    Thanks everybody!
     
  11. lorindaeb

    lorindaeb Junior Member

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    Well, I'm just gonna let my girl do her thing. I take her out if the nest box to let her eat and drink then back in she goes. As long as she doesn't lose to much weight, then no harm in letting her hatch air. :)
     
  12. piglett

    piglett Senior Member

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    slip an ice pack up inder that hen
    doing so will cool her breasts down & she will then understand that those eggs are too cold & will never hatch. do that each day & she will soon give up. come spring you also need a roo. if not that buff orpington will be in the nest all of the time for no reason.


    good luck
    piglett
     
  13. Sundancers

    Sundancers New Member

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    I guess it is in all in how you look at it...

    In my book, once a hen is on nest you let her be. (she will know better than you when she can feed/drink.)

    She will know if she can leave the nest or not ... We as "humans" think we know best ... which is not always true...

    IMO ~ Let Mother Nature work her magic... Once a hen is on the nest let her be ... If she will only hatch "air" break it now. (A few days in the time out cage will work!)

    Again ... this is IMHO ...
     
  14. lorindaeb

    lorindaeb Junior Member

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    Unfortunately because I live within city limits, I cannot have a roo. Although it would be fun to hatch chicks.

    I like the idea of ice if this is what she is going to keep doing. It just surprises me that she is keeping as warm as she is, it has been below freezing for several weeks here. I think that is also another reason I was so shocked she went broody.

    I also like the idea of letting Mother Nature take her course as well, but again, she will never have anything to hatch. I don't have a time out cage, I'm still so new to this that I guess I didn't think about this situation coming up.

    Thanks for all your input. Love that there are so many helpful people on this forum.

    Lorinda.