Boating adventures

Discussion in 'Chit-Chat' started by seminolewind, Apr 13, 2017.

  1. seminolewind

    seminolewind Well-Known Member

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    Yesterday was my first day out. I went all the way to the end of the channel (channel is dug deep in sand in a shallow area to lead boats out to deeper water). Our channel must be at least 3 miles long-it's really long! Then I came back. Realized I need trim tabs (flappy things attached to the back of boat to help the boat to plane. If you speed up boats they lift their bow up and I can't see.)

    Today was an adventure. Took boat out to the end of the channel and kept going. You know, things look way different when you look at them from the other way. I turn around and see nothing- no markers. I thought I saw one but it wasn't. I finally spotted the channel entrance. I think they need a higher tower there. And maybe a bright color.

    So I drive out a bit and try to anchor-8 times and gave up. So I drifted at a fast clip and cast my fishing pole out a few times. The swells were getting near 2 feet, so I put my vest on. I started back and actually put the safety clip on-if you fall off your chair the boat stops. I was getting wet, but still the swells were mostly a foot and not close to eachother. An occasional 2 feet.

    Has anyone ever seen a water front boating neighborhood? It's like a neighborhood grid of channels and lots of houses. No signs. I guess I passed my "exit" and ended up way down in the neighborhood around a marina a few miles away. So I turn around and head back out toward the bay wondering where I went wrong. In this grid/neighborhood, there's a speed limit they call "no wake" but should be called a crawl. Painfully slow.

    I get back out to the bay/ channel and some really nice people guided me back to my marina. And I took notice of what #exit I need to get off next time.

    So I survived my first and 2nd time out with my boat alone. I couldn't figure out how to unfold the bimini shade so it stayed folded and I got a sun burn.
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    Good job for your first & second times out by yourself.
    Anchoring: Perhaps you were in too deep of water to anchor or the anchor couldve been dragging with fast current, then not enough chain was laid out. Fast currents are a pain. I drop anchor and back down to let the flukes dig into the sand or mud. You can tell when the anchor holds, the bow starts to sway back and forth. Also your fish finder will tell you how deep of water you're in.

    Current and wind can disorient you from your original position in a hurry. Familiarize yourself with something like a tall object on land close to the channel where you departed; such as a water tower, radio tower, a recognizable building etc...that way you'll have an idea where the channel is and will make the trip back easier for you. Binoculars help when you get out of eyesight of land, more importantly a compass is best or if your fish finder has GPS. I know nothing about programming GPS. Since you're on the west coast of Florida, it's really simple using a compass; heading out in the gulf is 270 degrees (west,) coming back in is 090 degrees (east.) For me here where I live on the east coast of Florida, it's the opposite.

    I had a bimini top on my boat, got rid of it, pain in the neck.
     

  3. chickenqueen

    chickenqueen Well-Known Member

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    That sounds kind of scary.I think you should get a buddy to go out with.Who would help you if you fell overboard?I think I'd get lost,too.Things are different when looking from the water.I get confused in the lakes around here and they aren't really that big,not like being out on the ocean.I look forward to hearing about your boating adventures....
     
  4. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    As I'm reading I'm thinking she didn't pay attention to the compass reading. This is where a good boating class could be very helpful in learning to chart and read a compass or as dawg mentioned using GPS settings. While I was still boating GPS was only for the rich so we had to depend on reading a compass accurately.

    And why were you alone? I thought you got the boat to satisfy the other half.
     
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, it's very rare I go out on a boat alone.
    I forgot to mention about trim tabs; I've never had them, but I know what you're talking about with the bow coming up. I dont think you can do it on your boat, but I've had to add weight up on the bow.
     
  6. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    How do you do that, dawg? Without it plowing at lower speeds.
     
  7. seminolewind

    seminolewind Well-Known Member

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    I am using the "motor tilt" to help but it does not help enough. If I fall overboard I have my vest on and if I'm driving I have a clip that stops the boat if I become unclipped. And a whistle (?)

    This area is fairly frequent with boats going out and coming back in.

    Hubby has a lot of problems, and does not feel comfortable going out. I think the pontoon thing was his wishful thinking. I got a boat with a pontoon like layout and width because I knew I'd be going out alone most likely. The Ex and I had a boat in the 80's. I had joined the coast guard auxillary at that time, and did learn a few things. I think I do need to wear my cell phone in a waterproof pouch so it's with me all the time. The signal is good out where I was.

    I was on the Hurricane website forum and they all swear by trim tabs. It does not look hard to install them once you get past the thought of drilling holes in your hull!

    I NEED A COMPASS! And binoculars! Dawg, the water I was in was 7 feet. The area I will boat in is mostly 6-9 feet deep, so the depthfinder is needed more for spotting shallow water. You have to go way out to hit deep water. From what I gather, I need a chain at the end of my anchor to help the anchor dragged horizontally. Then, the Marina guy says I may need to let out a lot of rope in a fast moving tide.

    I have 4 life vests, a life cushion, flare gun (!), whistles, and a horn or two.

    So far I've felt quite confident out there. I don't feel like I "must" have company.

    I think boats are a PIA with the bow coming up in the front. I ended up standing all the way back and all my muscles hurt today. The trim tabs I'm getting adjust themselves and will make the boat easier to plane and steer.

    My next goal is the Marina wants me to take the trailer home. But the license plate is locked in a compartment on the boat about 2 boats high. So I guess I'll take backroads with all the paperwork in my possession.
     
  8. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    Lower speeds wasnt the problem. I had power tilt and trim. It was opening it up to full speed that brought the bow up and kept it up until I added weight on the bow. The weight of the anchor/chain, a cooler full of ice and an extra full 6 gallon gas container up on the bow kept it at plane.
    That's what happens when you put a bigger horsepower motor above the required hp rating for the boat lol.
     
  9. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    My only experience is with I/O's or inboards so you're setup is entirely foreign to me. I can see why a more powerful, heavier outboard could cause issues with the bow lifting. All I could picture was the bow plowing through the waves until you were up on plane after adding extra weight. But then how does that happen if it's plowing? See the circle there?

    About the power tilt and trim, is that the same as trim tabs?
     
  10. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    There wasnt any plowing when the boat was going full speed, it was at even keel. When I slowed down...there was some plowing, not very fuel efficient. I usually moved the 6 gallon gas container back to the middle of the boat and that took care of it.
    Trim tabs are metal plates attached to the stern on either side of the motor. I've never had them, so I dont know much about them.




    Power tilt and trim are different than trim tabs, but they accomplish the same thing. Here's an article that I just read. I was curious about trim tabs and it explains about both systems in detail, good info.
    On my boat, the power tilt and trim was an up and down button located on console shift handle. It
    also had 2 remote buttons on the side of the motor.
    http://yamahaoutboards.com/yamaha-a...s/understanding-engine-trimtilt-and-trim-tabs

    I forgot to mention that my brother in law loves I/O's and inboards. I asked him why and he said they were easy to work on. I've always been an outboard person, ease of access for maintenance is my reasoning I suppose. I dont know much about I/O's and inboards, cost was the main factor.
     
  11. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    That was a good link, especially for a visual learner like me. Thanks.

    It's been a long time since the boat with the trim tabs which means I forgot just how they were deployed.

    They all have their plus' and minus'.

    And for some reason I never get port or starboard confused. But left or right? Let's just say I point with my finger just to cover my bases. Does anyone else do that?
     
  12. chickenqueen

    chickenqueen Well-Known Member

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    Does Florida offer free boating classes?If they do,it might be worth your time to take one.I kept remembering something I learned in a hunting class that may apply to you and the boat.The instructors kept saying the safety on a gun is a mechanical device that is prone to fail,do not depend on it and to treat your gun as always loaded.Your safety clip is also a mechanical device that is prone to failure.Don't stake your life on it.You could fall overboard and the boat can keep on going...
     
  13. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    Florida is surrounded by water and has numerous lakes, ponds, rivers and swamps. There are plenty of resources for free boating classes:
    http://www.myfwc.com/boating/safety-education/courses/
    I went through a LCM6 course and was a small tugboat captain while in the Navy. I started large tugboat quals but decided to take a different career path into law enforcement.
     
  14. seminolewind

    seminolewind Well-Known Member

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    Mine will have magic trim tabs that self adjust.

    It's hard when you start picking up speed and can't see over the nose of the boat because the hull (back) is bogging down. Trimming the motor (moving/tilting the propeller to bring the hull up) isn't working very well for me.

    Jim, as I was coming back yesterday, I'm heading up a channel with homes on both sides and signs in the middle of the channel saying "no wake". I am on my right hand side as in a car. This old fishing boat is on my side of the sign , going outbound,and getting closer and closer to me like squeezing me over close to people's docks. I assume I was on the correct side. Was I?
     
  15. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    If I remember correctly boats are supposed to pass on the port side, which would be the left.

    One of the things I saw a lot of in VA when I was living on the boat were people operating boats that had no clue. At the time I was living on a 45 footer, tied to it's berth. Some idiot went flying down the channel and created a wake so bad that it nearly knocked me off my feet. That might be who you encountered, someone with no clue.
     
  16. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    Robin is correct, should be port to port when head on with another vessel. Whether either boater is unsure of the rules of the road, it is both captains responsibility to avoid a collision at all costs.
    I've seen a lot of idiots on the water that had no business being out there.
    Here's a link for you Karen, read all of it if you get the chance, but pay particular attention to Rule 8,9,14,15. You were in the right.
    http://www.boatsafe.com/nauticalknowhow/122098tip.htm
     
  17. seminolewind

    seminolewind Well-Known Member

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    My ex and I had a boat in the 80's and both joined the Coast Guard Auxillary and taught people boating safety. I never rely on anything. But I might take a class just for a brush up.

    Adventure today. I went and picked up the trailer and brought it home. I tried multiple times to back it in and failed. I jack knifed and quit. Thank God no damage that a rubber mallet can't fix. So the hubs comes out and backs it in perfectly- however, he hit this piece of concrete block that he has guarding a sprinkler -with my tire and popped my tire off the rim!

    I could pound on him for a number of things. The area to back a trailer in has a fence opening that has a speed sign and telephone pole on one side. That's error #1. He widened the driveway by adding red stones on both sides outlined with 4x4 's. But the driveway is still narrowed by an opening in the fence. Then he gets mad if I hit the frame around the rocks. #2.

    I need room. I can't squeeze perfectly into these narrow openings. I might just have someone come and rip the fence down. It needs painting. It's crooked, and he's too disabled to do anything.

    So since tomorrow is a horse day and sunday is Easter, I guess I'll go fishing monday.
     
  18. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    I can relate lol. Since I've been out of boating for awhile, I drove down to an out of business Kmart empty parking lot and practiced backing with my boat. I was rusty for sure lol.
     
  19. chickenqueen

    chickenqueen Well-Known Member

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    After reading everybody's trials and tribulations of boating in real boats,I think I'll stick with my canoe.
     
  20. seminolewind

    seminolewind Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the link.

    Today hubby went off to buy a tire . This one had a 3 inch slash in it. I think he was talking about it like I was the one paying for it. I think not. His driving, and his CEMENT block.

    I should go to the supermarket parking lot and practice. Good idea.

    Okay, now for the utter stupidity award. I'm reading last night about tilt and trimming a boat because it just doesn't seem to be working for me.
    Tilt and trim is moving the propeller angle because when boats take off, they get nose high and take a while to come back down. If tilting is used, the boat's bow comes down faster and balances the boat.

    So I'm out there on the water, speeding up, tilting, and it's not really working. I try harder. It's not working. So I slow down so at least I can see in front of me while standing. I'm reading last night, and I realize that I was tilting the wrong way! No wonder it didn't work. Utterly dumb!