Beginner

Discussion in 'Beginners Forum' started by karaebaker, Dec 30, 2012.

  1. karaebaker

    karaebaker New Member

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    We have recently been talking about building a coop and raising chickens. We wanna let our girls do it to teach them some responsibility and we love fresh eggs. We have an . of the kind of coop we are gonna build but really have no idea as to how to choose chickens. Any help is appreciated
     
  2. chickflick

    chickflick New Member

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    I got a bunch of different breeds. The girls will love EE's cuz they lay blue or green or pink eggs! Go on a chicken breed site and look thru them, or get a book and you and the girls can pick out some they appeal to you.
     

  3. 7chicks

    7chicks New Member

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    I did a lot of on-line researching on breeds I could get locally. BackYardChickens was my main go to source for quick easy info. Easy breeds that are really friendly to name a few: Rhode Island Reds, Barred Rock (Tillie follows me EVERYwhere!), Australorp (really gorgeous jet black with green/purple irridescent coloring) and very mild mannered, Easter Eggers, Ameraucana's, Buff Orphingtons, and Isa Browns.
     
  4. haley4217

    haley4217 Junior Member

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    I applaud you for doing your research before buying. I believe that you should take into consideration your climate and if you live in an area of cold temperature find a breed that deals with cold well. Likewise if you are in a location subject to hot weather than select a breed that can tolerate heat. I've found that dealing with the cold is easier than dealing with the heat. Take time to research and make your own determination about pros and cons of heating the coop such as with a heat lamp. I don't!

    As to breeds I added some Dominique hens to my flock early 2012. I think you would be pleased with how this breed would fit in with your desire to have your kids involved. I find my girls to be very docile and with no signs of being flighty. They interact with me, or should I say the feed bucket, as they run out and follow me around. They are tolerant of cold, about 5 pounds when grown and have been prolific producers of medium brown eggs.
     
  5. rwilly

    rwilly New Member

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    I just go to the aution house and buy what looks good. There are plenty of chickens on Craigslist too.
    I don't know what the indicators are for judging the age of a bird, maybe the size of the comb? There a few breeds which are good egg layers, Rhode Island Reds, Sex-links, I am new to chickens too, so take my advice lightly.
     
  6. Mamachickof14

    Mamachickof14 New Member

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    I live in New York and it gets pretty cold here in the winter. I have 14 Rhode Island Reds and love them to pieces! We get real nice large brown eggs, they are very friendly and seem to be OK with the weather. If I had known I could, I would have gotten a variey of hens but I thought they had to be all the same???:rolleyes: I'm just one summer and my first winter into this...still lots to learn!! Jen
     
  7. BuckeyeChickens

    BuckeyeChickens New Member

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    Welcome & Greetings from Ohio....the Buckeye state!!!
    I'm talking the "Buckeye Chicken" NOT the worthless nut!!!

    Join or check out some Facebook groups or breed specific websites.....Buckeyes are an excellent breed because they are RARE and the ONLY breed to be created by a woman (great history lesson)! When it comes to COLD, the Buckeye is has a Pea Comb that won't freeze or get frostbite in the winter....like many Single Comb breeds. I've personally helped a lot of 4H kids get started here in SW Ohio and they are very easy for children to handle for a Large Fowl breed as well. Good luck with your research!
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2013
  8. karaebaker

    karaebaker New Member

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    We live in Mid-west Arkansas but I was born in Oxford, OH, my parents were both born and raised there and I still have a lot of family there who I visit on a regular basis so I am very found of Ohio. Thanks for all the help. We are about to start construction on a coop...we have a 6 1/2 acre lot and are planning on raising chickens not only for eggs but also to eat. I'm doing my research and still learning but very excited ab it all