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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
How many fig cuttings did you do last year? Is this another sideline for selling? It could be if you hadn't thought about it.
12-15. We thought of it with the figs and Lady Empress trees; and did sell a few LEs, but our location isn't good unless it's something people will go out of their way for. As to the fig trees, Kimmi will not think of it until there isn't a single spot left that could have a fig tree. With 2 1/2 acres, that could take a while!

You buy the quail? They are extremely expensive! Kimmi paid a whooping $1.50 each!!
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Robin-if you'd like a fig I can root one and mail it when ready. What you'd get is a small branch with roots and a couple leaves-no dirt. The roots would be in a plastic baggie-the whole would be in a large flat envelop. No cost. This you'd put in a pot or even a large container if you didn't want to plant it in the yard. They're dwarf.
 

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She certainly does; all the time and I'm one lucky hubby. The thirty year old Umbrella bonsai was a buy whatever she paid. The 55 year old Jade was a cheat, but one she could not have known by the picture on the ad as it looked truly impressive.

In typing all this I missed the whole point! Yesterday we were posting of fig trees and bonsai fig trees with fruit. By using the process from the above posts, it would/is an easy thing to find an old knarly fig branch that is old enough to bear fruit to start a bonsai fig this year that could bear fruit next year. Fig cutting are among the easiest to root; thus I will have an old fig bonsai with a new root system the same as that Jade bonsai Kimmi bought. I have the branch already picked out, so now to cut it from the tree just right, scrape a little bark off where I want roots to grow, apply rooting hormone, plant in a small or bonsai pot with well draining soil, place in the greenhouse, water sparingly, and in a month I'll have an "old" fig bonsai growing new leaves and roots. The thing to do is start a few just in case... Of those fig cuttings I started last year, 100% grew.
That is so cool!!!
 

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12-15. We thought of it with the figs and Lady Empress trees; and did sell a few LEs, but our location isn't good unless it's something people will go out of their way for. As to the fig trees, Kimmi will not think of it until there isn't a single spot left that could have a fig tree. With 2 1/2 acres, that could take a while!

You buy the quail? They are extremely expensive! Kimmi paid a whooping $1.50 each!!
Haven't heard back yet. Quail are popular around here so even if I don't hear anything from this one there are others.
 

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Robin-if you'd like a fig I can root one and mail it when ready. What you'd get is a small branch with roots and a couple leaves-no dirt. The roots would be in a plastic baggie-the whole would be in a large flat envelop. No cost. This you'd put in a pot or even a large container if you didn't want to plant it in the yard. They're dwarf.
Would I even be around when it was old enough to produce fruit?
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Would I even be around when it was old enough to produce fruit?
If you plan to be alive in a couple years, yes. I can also speed things up by picking an older branch to use as a cutting. But first, you need to find out if you like eating figs. There's no point in sending one if you don't like figs!

OM- when next your here I'm sure Kimmi would give you a fig cutting we have that's already started.
 

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That could be tough since I've never seen anything about figs around here. I wonder if they could even tolerate the growing season here.
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
That could be tough since I've never seen anything about figs around here. I wonder if they could even tolerate the growing season here.
I have seen them in the food markets, but Robin, if it's not something being looked for, it's not seen. I never saw them at the market until I actually looked for them; same for Kimmi.

There's cold, cool, subtropical, and tropical varieties of fig. Ours does well in our hottest, humid weather; I doubt you'd have a problem growing them. The fruit I seen at the store are called, brown turkey figs. The following is from Google:

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Brown Turkey fig tree

Brown Turkey figs (Ficus carica 'Brown Turkey”) are sweet, delicious fruits that have rusty red to purplish skin and richly toned pink flesh. ... The flowers are not showy and develop at the ends of the branches, with subsequent fruit ready for harvest at the early summer end of summer or into late fall early fall.Feb 16, 2021What a dumb-ass.

I have never seen a fig flower; the fruit starts as a tiny green ball that grows into the delicious fruit. The fruit develops all along the branches-not just at the ends. Whoever wrote this does not have or know anything about figs!
 

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Do I assume you're the one that wrote what a dumb-ass?

Well, I've got the space for one with all of the trees I've taken out. And two years isn't bad.
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Do I assume you're the one that wrote what a dumb-ass?
Did I do tthhhhhhaaaaaatttttttttttt?
Well, I've got the space for one with all of the trees I've taken out. And two years isn't bad.
I will start one, or two, today. Should you find that you don't want it, no problem, I still have a lot of the 2 1/2 acres to go-HA.
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I will need lots of information so I can plan where to plant it.
Since you are south, I think partial sun would be best, though the net will say full sun. Soil that drains well is preferred, but ours are doing well in a clay soil growing under the eaves of the garage. Figs are a hardy tree that seems to do well in a variety of situations. I will be sending it sometime before fall; whenever the root system has developed enough so you have a fighting chance, plus, at it's survival. I've already planted a few cuttings today, but I'm not satisfied with the cutting diameters. A long sleepless night; after a rest and a nap I'm going to look again for a bigger diameter cutting. When new cuttings are sealed in gallon baggies they seem to always grow. Late last fall Kimmi trimmed the largest fig tree and stuck the trimmings in dirt; no rooting hormones or baggie covering. Just stuck in dirt and left out in the elements. I've recently transplanted several of those trimmings when I saw new growth on them. Question-we have full size and dwarf. Both will take about the same amount of time before fruiting. What would you prefer? Something that will grow into a bigger, "shade" tree or a mini, suitable for a large container pot? Either are Chicago Brown Turkey figs.

Once you get the cutting it would be best to plant it in a container and winter (do you have freezing weather?) it in the garage or other unheated place. (A couple years I put my new cuttings in the turkey shed for the winter and that worked great even with birds tromping on them.) Then in the spring plant it wherever you plan to have it long term; in the ground or a planter outside. The first year I put new fig trees in a safe, sheltered spot to give the root system and trunk more time to mature before having to grow in the elements. Very likely I'm giving myself more work that isn't really necessary. I rather treat the plants/trees like I do the birds/dogs.

If I've made it confusing and hard seeming to grow fig trees, it isn't. They're among the easiest of plants to grow and maintain.

As an aside about the puppy that was hurt (it's doing great). Yesterday I figured out what went wrong. Kimmi was playing with the puppies and telling me how one didn't look at all like the rest. One look told the story. Somehow we mixed up the puppies and gave Sassy the wrong one. Unlike the other females, Sassy will not accept some other dog's pup. Mystery solved and a lesson for us learned. Now the poor puppy is with the right mom and litter mates and all is well.
 

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The dwarf. That way I can plant it close to the house for partial shade and ease of watering. We kind of, sort of get cold weather. This past winter is the first time I've seen freezing temps in quite some time.

Of all the crazy things. That poor baby. Maybe they all need to be color coded to keep that from happening again.
 

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Serama King
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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
The dwarf. That way I can plant it close to the house for partial shade and ease of watering. We kind of, sort of get cold weather. This past winter is the first time I've seen freezing temps in quite some time.

Of all the crazy things. That poor baby. Maybe they all need to be color coded to keep that from happening again.
This is the first day in a month that Kimmi seems herself; I've a ways to go. Both puppies were hurt because of me and Kimmi not being anywhere near 100%. Luckily, there's been happy endings.

Dwarf it is; the fruit is the same size and taste; just less of it. You would not have to do anything extra for winter months.
 
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