Chicken Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
granny
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just brought home 4 chicks from the feed store today. A Welsummer; Astrolorp; Salmon Favarolle; and a black sex link. The question is the Welsummer chick is aggressive toward all the others--pecking at eyes etc. I have separated her, but of course now she is lonely and cheeping loudly. Any suggestions?
I have been raising chick in the same way for years and have never had this problem. I had a Welsummer last year and she is bossy but was never aggressive as a chick.
 

·
granny
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have put some sod in the brooder as well as keeping them separated for a while--will put them back together after 48 hours and see how that goes--thanks for the suggestion
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
22,333 Posts
Sod, as in still in the dirt? If still in the dirt you could be introducing coccci to the peeps. If not in the dirt the long blades of grass can get wadded in the crop causing an impacted crop.
 

·
granny
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hmmm I have never had that problem before, but under the circumstances I am happy to learn something new and just get some salad out of the fridge:)
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
22,333 Posts
One of the posters here did a big whoops. She knows a lot about chickens but she suffered one of those brain fade moments and brought in some soil for her peeps to dust bathe in. Next thing she knew she had chicks down and if I remember right lost a couple. It took a lot of talking back & forth before she finally realized what she did. She treated her peeps with anti cocci meds and saved the rest.

Grass is very fibrous and the crop can not grind it like it does feed and smaller seeds. It ultimately ends up wadded up in the crop and can not pass through. That's why, if you used sod, it was the right thing to do except for the fact they're chicks and very susceptible for developing a cocci over load. Grass that still has roots in the soil allows the birds to just, snip isn't the right word, but remove the tender tip of the grass.

Edit to add: How is the overly curious chick doing now?
 

·
granny
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks again for the explanation I appreciate the info.
My little welsummer chick is back in with the others who are all a bit tougher now as well, and they seem to be getting along fine--the usual curiosity with each other and their environment but no out and out hurting each other. Thank goodness as they were each carefully chosen by the grand kids, it would have been tragic to have one kill another!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Actually I had just read that introducing small amounts of soil and cocci boosts their immunity when given with medicated food. Its when giving medicated food and keeping things really clean, they cant naturally build an immunity. I just went thru a cocci problem, lost one chick and almost a second despite keeping everything clean and feeding med feed. In nature, they would be in the soil. I believe its something to be considered.
 

·
granny
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This brings up a good point. We have had many chicks free ranging with their moms and no problems. I never feed the medicated feed. Scratch and peck non GMO- non medicated chick feed chick grit, clean water and some greens--now not the long grass in sod at least until they are a few weeks old. The same thing applies to kids-- playing in the dirt can be healthy. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Having chicks hatched and taken care of naturally at your home are quite different than chicks that are purchased from mass suppliers. And these chicks are already stressed from being shipped. All this stress naturally lowers the immune system thus them being more suseptable to sickness. Robin knows her stuff. I have learned so much from her on my hens. I have found she is always right and has a wealth of knowledge for us to glean from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
There is a huge difference between hatching eggs from birds that rummage in the dirt and bringing home chicks hatched from eggs that came from hens who don't know what sunlight is.

I threw sod in with hatchery chicks a couple weeks old last year and cocci abounded. I can put chicks that I've hatched on dirt and never have an issue. I don't feed medicated feed, either, as I don't see the point as they'll either get cocci or the won't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Just leaving a small testament, I took my last flock of chicks outside in the dirt and they all contacted cocidia , and eventually passed it onto my Wyandotte. Luckily I got medication everyone survived but it did happen. Lesson learned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
409 Posts
Actually I had just read that introducing small amounts of soil and cocci boosts their immunity when given with medicated food. Its when giving medicated food and keeping things really clean, they cant naturally build an immunity. I just went thru a cocci problem, lost one chick and almost a second despite keeping everything clean and feeding med feed. In nature, they would be in the soil. I believe its something to be considered.
Incubated chicks in a brooder box and chicks brooded outside by a hen are two different situations. Chicks developing immunity is a gradual process, and in nature, mortality is higher. When done correctly in a brooder box, to the grow off pen and range, mortality is lessened. medicated feed is recommended to use for the first 16 weeks from producers. Chicks that may not eat enough will experience higher numbers of Cocci protozoa in their intestinal tract, and their immunity to everything is compromised since immunity begins in the intestinal tract. Adding soil to chicks in the brooder runs the risk of further overwhelming them with Cocci, parasitic worm eggs, and bacteria. They already are exposed to Cocci protozoa in their droppings, so adding soil just multiplies the amount of protozoa.

Chickens drink more than they eat.
This is why Amprolium in a water dispersible form is better used as a preventative beginning at around 2-3 weeks of age., for a length of 5 days, every 3 weeks. This assists in building immunity before they are old enough to go to the grow off pen and range. I do this up until pullets/cockerels are 7-9 months of age. Anyone that doubts this procedure, I would say raise 2 batches of chicks using a preventative with one and not the other, and see how many survive from each batch.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,209 Posts
I had some chicks that got cocci on medicated food. It's not a guarantee. I hope people realize that if they have a sick chick on medicated feed , they need to consider cocci anyway.

I have never had broody chicks get cocci. And I've had one who was never outside get it. I've had one get it that was vaccinated against it. So I don't do anything but have my medication at home because it can't wait a few days. And I will tube the medicated water if they are not drinking.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top