A Couple of Questions

Discussion in 'General Chicken Discussion' started by Dennis1209, May 27, 2020.

  1. Dennis1209

    Dennis1209 New Member

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    Hey Y'all,

    [Back story] I purchased 17 Rhode Island sexed pullets hatched on March 3, 2020. This is my fourth set of sexed laying hens. I was nearby at my garden again early in the morning, when I heard the unmistakable crowing of a ROOSTER. Still, when I get into the chicken coop and/or the chicken run, they scurry to where I am not. So, I haven't really paid attention and looked at them closely.

    This morning when I gave them fresh water and starter/grower I paid special attention and looked them over. Sure enough, we gots us a rooster [surprise].

    Now I need to determine if I want to keep the rooster or not. I only have chickens for the eggs and never had a rooster. There's only four benefits I can think of for having a rooster; protect the hens, eat, fertilize and listen to the nice crowing in the mornings. The neighbors rooster badly tears up the hens and they look terrible and have wounds from mounting. This spring around here there seemed to be a big shortage of purchasing baby chicks, especially the breed(s) I'd settle for for my purposes of just eggs.

    This has got too long already so to my question: If I buy an incubator and try and hatch my own for the next set; is there a way to determine what eggs have been fertilized and/or... Roughly, what percentage of eggs will hatch if randomly picked from the nesting box? I know I'll have to do some reading and digging around this forum to find answers to my questions.

    Thanks all!
     
  2. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    You got a rooster! It's a bonus because they do have other benefits with their personalities. That's as long as he doesn't see the humans as being a problem around his hens. A rooster adds so much personality to a flock.

    There is no way to tell what is fertile and what isn't unless you crack open the egg and look for a bullseye in the yolk. Problem is, you can't incubate the egg.

    You should have at least a 75% hatch rate if all the conditions are met. Usually more. That means temp and humidity have to be right which also means having quality instruments to keep track of those two things.

    If your boy becomes too aggressive with the girls when it comes to breeding he needs to be removed until he matures a bit more. They can be overbearing in breeding when they're still teenagers. That's what your neighbor should be doing before their roo kills one of the hens.
     

  3. Sylie

    Sylie Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Every one here on the forum will tell you what I think about RiR's. That being said and now ignored...I bought 4 RiR's years ago and 1 turned out to be a rooster also. The hens were monsters, they were horrible, I swear I'll never have another RiR as long as I live BUT...the rooster (for as long as I was able to keep him) was very sweet, he would perch on my arm and go with me on walks etc. He HATED my husband and would bite and spur him every chance he got but he was sweet to me. I'm pretty sure he thought of my husband as competition and me as another hen.

    I agree with what robin said, all of it lol She's a smart cookie
     
  4. robin416

    robin416 Administrator Staff Member

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    Sylie, every once in awhile I find the key to the lock box that allows the info I have stuffed into my brain to come out. Seems like I misplace that key more often these days.

    Thank you for that.
     
    Sylie likes this.
  5. Sylie

    Sylie Super Moderator Staff Member

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    :D