Toenails and Over Breeding

Discussion in 'Emergencies, Illness, Meds & Cures' started by bkenright, Mar 19, 2014.

  1. bkenright

    bkenright New Member

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    Hello! I have 2 questions.

    1. Does anyone out there trim their chickens' toenails (or claws or whatever they are supposed to be called)? If so, I would appreciate any pointers. I've looked online, but have gotten mixed results. Fyi: my chickens will get on my lap for treats or jump on me for a perch, but don't want to be picked up. They are currently on straw covered concrete and love to scratch at it all day. I thought that would help keep them trimmed (like a dog), but there are 2 that are getting a bit long. Also, how about asking the vet to do it? Is that done? :D

    2. I know that my roo to hen ratio is not good, but I was hoping to get by ok until I get more girls this spring. I was supposed to have 8 girls, but ended up with 2 and a bunch of roos. I gave away all but 1 roo. They all got along great, until lately. The roo is paying too much attention to 1 of the girls. She is getting a bald spot. I thought it was getting better, but now it's getting worse. Now that it has warmed up some, I might be able to kick him outside, but if he free ranges, he will probably not make it. :( How big can the spot get before I need to worry about her?

    Thank you all so much for reading this! :what:
     
  2. robin416

    robin416 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, trimming nails is easy. Just don't cut to short and get the quick. I use nail clippers for dogs to trim those of mine that need it.

    You will have to pull him out. Even with chicken aprons to protect the hen they can be injured with the non stop attention. Get a large dog crate or cage and put him in it. That way you don't have to leave him out to risk being killed.
     

  3. bkenright

    bkenright New Member

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    Thank you Robin! The coop and run were put in an old shed for the winter and tomorrow I'm going to put him in the area between the shed and the coop. I didn't want to do it while it was so cold (this winter was awful!) because he wouldn't have been as warm, especially at night. He won't be happy, but maybe after she heals and the coop is back outside, we can try him back inside. Thanks! :D
     
  4. robin416

    robin416 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    It can be a difficult situation for them. They just don't get that too much attention to the hens is not a good thing. And it adds to your frustration trying to protect the girls from injury.