Think my chicken is dying, any advice welcome

Discussion in 'Emergencies, Illness, Meds & Cures' started by SusanW, Aug 7, 2017.

  1. SusanW

    SusanW New Member

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    Hi, my name is Susan. I have a chicken that was attacked by a dog last night. We got the dog away before he killed her. She didn't appear to be hurt, no blood or puncture wounds that I could find. Brought her down to the kitchen and fixed up a box with straw. Dropped some water with rescue remedy in it down her beak (she's a rescue hen so top beak has been clipped, so water will run into her lower one) she wasn't really interested but after a while she started eating oats, she ate a good amount but still wasnt interested in drinking. She rested for about an hour and then started grooming herself. It was getting dusk and i thought she'd be ok now to go back to the coop (with 9 other chickens). She seemed ok before i locked them in. This morning on leaving them out she did'nt come out with the others and when I checked on her she was sitting where she sat last night. I brought her out to the food but she wasn't interested, just stood there. So I've brought her bk to the kitchen and but her in the box with straw, as i was carrying her she had a rattle when she was breathing, gave her oats, but not interested. Mixed Bach's remedy with water and Put It in a syringe (without needle) and as i was dripping onto her beak, she drank 2 syringes of water. She's standing in the box and opening and closing her eyes but not moving, the rattling stopped within a cpl of mins of putting her in the box. I'm afraid she's dying. Is there anything anyone can suggest. She was alot more alert last night than this morning. Sorry so long winded and appreciate any advice. Best Susan
     
  2. nannypattyrn

    nannypattyrn Active Member

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    Hi Susan, welcome to the forum. I'm so sorry about your chicken. My experience is that after an attack like that, the birds are very sore even without and open wound. There's most likely bruising and possible internal injury (ies). I think you are doing the best thing right now by keeping her inside and giving her nourishment. I also think someone here suggested baby aspirin for the pain. One of the leaders will be around shortly I'm sure for more advice.

    Sent from my SM-T580 using Chicken Forum mobile app
     
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  3. robin416

    robin416 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Everything Patty said. If she doesn't have any internal injuries chances are very high she's sore as all get out. It works the same way as with us humans when we've had the same type of very stressful thing happen.

    And yes, a baby aspirin in a half gallon of water might bring some relief. Some don't like it because of the possibility of internal bleeding but if there's any internal bleeding that isn't addressed we are going to lose them anyway.
     
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  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Well-Known Member

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    The "rattling" sounds like a punctured air sac, and/or possibly other internal injuries... not good. I agree with Patty and Robin, provide comfort care as best as you can.
     
  5. profwirick

    profwirick Yaya

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    They teach us about caring and about loss. My dear old Kiwi died rather peacefully for no apparent reason this week. It took a few days of slowing down more and more. At first I tried to actively care for her. She has never liked any handling, so soon I just let her be. Now there are just one little hen and the Rooster, from my first little chicken family of ten, which arrived at age two days under Mama Rosa five years ago. Rosa and three of her daughters died like this over a very spread out few years. Maybe it's a family thing?
     
  6. robin416

    robin416 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Exactly, even with vet intervention too often there is nothing to be done.

    profwirick, it is entirely possible that there was a genetic link if they all came from the same line. At five years, though, it might have been more an old age thing. Yes, some of us have birds double that age but our birds are not common. Yet.
     
  7. seminolewind

    seminolewind SuperModerator Staff Member

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    Maybe they had poor immune systems.