Storeing eggs/shelf life

Discussion in 'Egg Quality & Storage' started by Sonjabeam, Oct 4, 2012.

  1. Sonjabeam

    Sonjabeam Junior Member

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    I was told that you do not have to refrigerate eggs? Does anyone know self life?
     
  2. rob

    rob New Member

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    i never keep eggs in the fridge.
     

  3. kiwicsi

    kiwicsi Junior Member

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    I always store them in the fridge. Probably not so important in winter, but our summer is hot and humid so I want to keep the eggs as fresh as possible. Of course, I only have store-bought free range eggs at the moment, because I don't yet have my chickens. Not long to wait though!
     
  4. Sundancers

    Sundancers New Member

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    It will vary ... IMO. (Hot, muggy southern summer vs cooler, dryer northern climate.

    An egg will be edible for 4 ta 6 weeks but the freshness is lacking at about 2 weeks... Again this is just the way I see it. ;)
     
  5. markhorsley68

    markhorsley68 New Member

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    28 days at room temperature and longer in the fridge but if you store them in the fridge don't store them next to garlic,chopped onion,fish etc as the shells are porous and will take on the smell of strong odours.
     
  6. Sonjabeam

    Sonjabeam Junior Member

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    Thanks everyone for your info. Interesting that they will take on the smell of strong odors from the fridge.
     
  7. redmaples

    redmaples Junior Member

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    yes eggs are very porus and can take on strong odors. washing eggs shortens shelf by how much I don't know. They will last longer under refridgeration, again I don't know how much longer but it does. Eggs are rarely around at house for 7-10 days MAX anyway. If we don't use them they are sold.
     
  8. cogburn

    cogburn New Member

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    I keep 6-10 dozen in fridge to sell, and a basket on the counter has 8-10-15 in it all times, that's the ones I use for me and the kids. I know old timers used to oil their eggs, and even freeze them. But I don't do either... To be honest shelf life is never a concern here, because they are gone pretty quick, my demand is greater than my supply, but that should change come spring !
     
  9. Sonjabeam

    Sonjabeam Junior Member

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    My chickens are molting right now so not many eggs. My customers are alittle unhappy, but are patcient. I have 22 chickens.
     
  10. hillbillyman

    hillbillyman New Member

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    Also they say if you put the more pointed end of the egg upside down they stay fresh longer, because that's the end that the egg obtains air from. So basically your not letting air in. This is my understanding. As earlier stated don't wash them right away, when the hen lays the egg there is a protective film that makes them stay fresher longer. Hope this helps you.
     
  11. CharlieEcho

    CharlieEcho Junior Member

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    Number of weeks;

    There was a recent article on the web about the length of time one can store eggs to eat. The use by date on the carton is a few weeks off. Also the packing date is not the same as the date the egg was laid.

    We store ours in the bottom of the fridge. They don't last very long there because we give them to family and friends. Sometimes ten dozen at a time may be found in our fridge. We have 25 hens and usually have better than ten eggs a day gathered.

    We only wash the egg if it's soiled some how. We almost always have to
    wash our duck eggs. Otherwise our hens are pretty good about keeping their nests pretty clean and neat. We have some milk crates with cardboard in the bottoms as well as straw for boxes and wooden boxes in the barn.

    I have an old egg crate that belonged to my grandparents, that holds several dozen eggs. I recall they kept the crate in the cellar, with milk
    cans as well, until it was full. They sold the eggs to a local grocery store. I recall the man at the store "candling" the eggs when they were delivered.
    The cellar has fallen into disrepair over the years.

    They sold the eggs to the grocery stores and a truck would come around once or twice a week and pick up the full "milk cans" and leave empties to be filled. They had a milk seperator to seperate the cream from the milk. The cream was put into a smaller can or made into butter. The grocery store would buy and butcher livestock, chickens included, for sale in their store. This was in the mid to late 50's.
     

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  12. kaax

    kaax Junior Member

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    Cool Cellar :cool:

    I did a little research on egg storage a few years ago. It kinda boiled down to about 6 weeks on the counter, 6 months in the fridge.

    Sounds Yucky, I know. I can't imagine eating the 6 month old egg.

    I'm one of those that eats todays or yesterdays eggs and give away the rest. they never sit around here longer than a couple weeks.

    Here's an interesting article about storing eggs.

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/Sustainable-Farming/1977-11-01/Fresh-Eggs.aspx

    Kaax
     
  13. CharlieEcho

    CharlieEcho Junior Member

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    Disrepair;

    I did say it was in disrepair. The current owners were kind enough to let me take pictures a while back. I was researching root-cellars. It was very serviceable and in use when I was a youth. Here is the one where I grew up and at the home my mother still lives in. And, another where my sister lives. We do not store anything in my mothers, but my sister uses her's for gardening tools and supplies.
     

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  14. Sonjabeam

    Sonjabeam Junior Member

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    Egg storage

    Does anyone know if by boiling the eggs if it prolongs the shelf life ?
     
  15. fuzziebutt

    fuzziebutt Flocker

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    No, once they are boiled, you would only want to keep them a few days.
     
  16. doubleoakfarm

    doubleoakfarm New Member

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    In many countries you never refrigerate eggs. We don't at home, but US laws require we refrigerate the ones we sell.
     
  17. cindlady2

    cindlady2 New Member

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    If in doubt you can always do a float test. The older the egg the more it will tip but is usually OK. If it starts to float... pitch it.
    Another thing to keep in mind, fertile eggs if left at room temp. are still hatchable after about 2 weeks. (No, they don't develop on the counter.... unless it's really hot! LOL